Page 58 of 60 FirstFirst ... 8485657585960 LastLast
Results 1,711 to 1,740 of 1773

Thread: Backyard Wildlife

  1. #1711
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,471
    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Okay, selective pressure for the trait makes sense to me, although I've never seen a melanistic red squirrel as dark as this fox.

    Interesting to me was the fact that this fox spent a lot of time over a five day period hanging out in my yard. Much of the time was spent rolled into a ball and sleeping in the same spot as in those photos. I observed years ago that bears will often find a spot to nap and then return to it daily for about a week. I guess like humans, other species can come to enjoy a particular place.

    Then I'm weird too, because that's what I saw at first.
    All it needs is laser beams on its head.

  2. #1712
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,759
    What you posted:

    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	shark2.jpg 
Views:	40 
Size:	339.6 KB 
ID:	25904
    What I saw at first glance:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Airwolf.jpg 
Views:	152 
Size:	61.1 KB 
ID:	25905
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  3. #1713
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,741
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I've certainly read speculation that the melanistic morphs of red fox and various tree squirrels persist at more northerly latitudes because they have a thermal advantage. I've certainly yet to see a melanistic squirrel or fox in Scotland, where our winters below the tree-line generally don't get much below freezing for any long period of time.

    Grant Hutchison
    Loads of black squirrels in Vancouver, BC. It doesn't get very cold there, either.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #1714
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,912
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I know my brain is weird, and the line over the shark is the water line, but to me this sign looks like a cross between a shark and a heliocopter.
    My exact thought.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #1715
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Loads of black squirrels in Vancouver, BC. It doesn't get very cold there, either.
    Black squirrels are quite common in Northeast Ohio and have been increasing in numbers, so it would seem there might be some sort of advantage.

    Cleveland.com

    Black squirrels have long been iconic in the Kent area, and wildlife experts say there is evidence to suggest they’re becoming more common elsewhere in Northeast Ohio.

    But the lack of available data on the subject makes it difficult to determine why, experts said.

    Kent State University recognizes the elusive critter as its unofficial mascot and holds an annual black squirrel festival that features food trucks, music and student organizations. The university celebrated 50 years of black squirrels on campus back in 2011, and also hosts an annual 5k race named after the critter.

    ...

    Information on the dark-furred rodents is limited because, contrary to popular belief, black squirrels aren’t a unique species. They’re simply a mutated variant of the eastern gray or fox squirrels, which are both common in Ohio, Cleveland Metroparks naturalist Jeff Riebe said.

    The squirrels’ black pelt is the result of a rare genetic hiccup that can occur in any gray or fox squirrel, he said.

    ...

    The minimal research available on the black form of the gray and fox squirrels speculates that subtle changes in habitat could contribute to an increase in their population. This research, conducted by the American Society of Mammalogists, also suggests that its dark color could make it more resistant to cold, consequently increasing the population farther north, Smith said.

    The black hue of the squirrel’s fur might allow it to blend in with shaded areas and afford protection from predators such as coyotes, foxes and red-tailed hawks. Many forests in Northeast Ohio are becoming older, causing the canopy to grow larger and shade greater portions of the woods, he said.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  6. #1716
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,543
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I know my brain is weird, and the line over the shark is the water line, but to me this sign looks like a cross between a shark and a heliocopter.

    Tonight’s movie on SyFy, “SharkCopter”.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  7. #1717
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,601
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I know my brain is weird, and the line over the shark is the water line, but to me this sign looks like a cross between a shark and a heliocopter.

    Thank goodness someone else sees that! Every time I look at that shark symbol my first thought is that is a strangely shaped helicopter. Perhaps it could be used in one of those idiotic "Sharknado" films?

    Edit: It seems to be somewhat common thought - does this mean we are all weird?
    Last edited by ozduck; 2021-Feb-17 at 10:37 AM.

  8. #1718
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,741
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Thank goodness someone else sees that! Every time I look at that shark symbol my first thought is that is a strangely shaped helicopter. Perhaps it could be used in one of those idiotic "Sharknado" films?

    Edit: It seems to be somewhat common thought - does this mean we are all weird?
    They'd have done better to depict the water surface with a wavy line!

    I've been wondering what type of shark. If the water is partly fresh, as seems likely, bull sharks would be a possibility.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #1719
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    8,971
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    They'd have done better to depict the water surface with a wavy line!
    They did. It's just not easily visible at the resolution of the posted photo.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  10. #1720
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,407
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Edit: It seems to be somewhat common thought - does this mean we are all weird?
    We are a bunch of nerds that like science, astronomy, and space flight, and can quote HGTTG and Monty Python from memory....
    I'll leave the answer as an exercise for the students.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  11. #1721
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,741
    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    They did. It's just not easily visible at the resolution of the posted photo.
    Oh, I see. But the waves under the swimmer are clearly visible, they should have used bigger ones!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  12. #1722
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,759
    Meanwhile, at Target...

    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  13. #1723
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,172
    They look in good shape. And chowing down on aspen or other woody twigs. It always amazes me how they can eat that stuff all winter and come out the other side okay.

  14. #1724
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,759
    Probably one our year-round residents. Roughly 700-1000 moose overwinter in the “Anchorage Bowl.”
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  15. #1725
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,741
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Probably one our year-round residents. Roughly 700-1000 moose overwinter in the “Anchorage Bowl.”
    Probably kind of like our abundant deer.
    No predators, can't be hunted in populated areas, and people intentionally plant stuff they like to eat. Pretty much deer heaven.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #1726
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,460
    I took the dog outside and we encountered 2 or 3 deer at the back of the garage. The were happily eating the lilac bush when we interrupted. They continued to chew on branches as the dog tried to get them to play. They didn't want to play with us and took of running. The funny thing is they bounded out of the yard in 5 jumps, across 2 backyards in 10 more jumps but stopped at the street and used the sidewalk to make their escape. They met up with the other deer at the corner and off they went.
    Solfe

  17. #1727
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Clear Lake City, TX
    Posts
    13,091
    I took my dog outside and we encountered a lizard ... a green anole.

    Yeah, big deal, right? Well, this anole hangs out around the downspout that runs beside the backyard gate. Brody has seen it several times and looks for it when we go to the gate. Which is what he did the other day. And while he was looking for the anole, it jumped from above and landed on the top of Brody's head. It sat there - unnoticed - for about three seconds before leaping into the bushes and escaping, also unnoticed as Brody was fixated on the downspout.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

    Moderation will be in purple.
    Rules for Posting to This Board

  18. #1728
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I took my dog outside and we encountered a lizard ... a green anole.

    Yeah, big deal, right? Well, this anole hangs out around the downspout that runs beside the backyard gate. Brody has seen it several times and looks for it when we go to the gate. Which is what he did the other day. And while he was looking for the anole, it jumped from above and landed on the top of Brody's head. It sat there - unnoticed - for about three seconds before leaping into the bushes and escaping, also unnoticed as Brody was fixated on the downspout.
    Too bad you didn't get a video.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  19. #1729
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,397
    A little flock of yellowhammers blew through today--birds that won't be familiar to those in North America. They're lovely little things:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yellowhammer1.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	450.3 KB 
ID:	25951
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yellowhammer3.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	434.4 KB 
ID:	25952
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yellowhammer2.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	394.1 KB 
ID:	25953

    Grant Hutchison

  20. #1730
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,759
    Handsome little birds, indeed. They remind me of our little Yellow and Wilson’s warblers that I’m fond of.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  21. #1731
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,741
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Handsome little birds, indeed. They remind me of our little Yellow and Wilson’s warblers that I’m fond of.
    Warblers, you say. But then there's this:
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Woke up to this:





    As good as it is, we weren’t sure how my wife’s car would fare on our unplowed hill after 16 inches of snow. So I took the day off and drove her to work.
    Penguins. You obviously have only penguins.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #1732
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,759
    Only in the zoo.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  23. #1733
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    3,094
    Mrs. Nowhere set up a window-mounted bird feeder for the amusement of our cat. This was our first (known) customer.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0194 small.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	821.4 KB 
ID:	25962

    You can see the damage to the screen where he climbed up.

    Fred
    Hey, you! "It's" with an apostrophe means "it is" or "it has." "Its" without an apostrophe means "belongs to it."

    "For shame, gentlemen, pack your evidence a little better against another time."
    -- John Dryden, "The Vindication of The Duke of Guise" 1684

    Earth's sole legacy will be a very slight increase (0.01%) of the solar metallicity.

  24. #1734
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Nowhere Man View Post
    Mrs. Nowhere set up a window-mounted bird feeder for the amusement of our cat. This was our first (known) customer.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0194 small.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	821.4 KB 
ID:	25962

    You can see the damage to the screen where he climbed up.

    Fred
    Completely unsurprised, since our bird feeder is occupied by those furry birds almost as much as it is occupied by feathered birds.
    Still the cat seems amused either way.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  25. #1735
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,083
    Speaking of cats, we don't have any. But all the neighbourhood cats visit our yard daily. Fine by me, keeps the house mouse-free almost as effectively as burning your lot down. Anyway, one of the neighbourhood cats took refuge on our trampoline (first thing to dry in the morning) about a year ago. I soon saw why: she had hurt one of her front paws. She rested there a few days and was good to go again. A few months later: same cat, same story. This week: same cat, same story. Either this cat has an issue with its front paw, or it is a really clumsy cat. She's getting better now, still not 100% but starting to regain her mobility. And lo and behold, mrs Evel Knievel found it wise in her half-cripled state to climb a high fence and try to jump from there onto a tall garden shed. Which in the end she didn't do as it was a bit too much for three and a half paws. But looking at that behaviour in her current state, I'd bet on the cat being overzealous/clumsy rather than having a medical condition.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  26. #1736
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,741
    We acquired a "squirrel proof" bird feeder quite a few years ago. It was a plastic bowl for the seed, with a plastic dome that came down over it, with a gap for the birdies to get through. At some peril to life an limb, I installed a hook at the very corner of the roof of our house, leaning way out over the deck to do so. No way a squirrel could get there.
    The next day the seed bowl was full of gray fur. I think they figured it out faster than the birds. Who are, after all, birdbrains.

    The birds later got even. My wife started feeding the squirrels peanuts. That also attracted Stellar's Jays. They could take two at a time, half-swallowing one and taking the other in the beak. Being quite smart birdbrains, they took to rapping on the sliding door when they wanted more.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #1737
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The birds later got even. My wife started feeding the squirrels peanuts. That also attracted Stellar's Jays. They could take two at a time, half-swallowing one and taking the other in the beak. Being quite smart birdbrains, they took to rapping on the sliding door when they wanted more.
    Jays are corvids (same family as ravens and crows and magpies) and are very smart.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  28. #1738
    Right now there are over a dozen deer in the backfield and I didn't see them because I have a picture deer in front my window.

    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  29. #1739
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,759

    Backyard Wildlife

    After shoveling the walk and shoveling the deck (wet, heavy snow) I shoveled my way out to the storage shed to retrieve the game camera. There's quite the load of snow on the roof and when it slides off, I didn't want it to take out the camera. The camera has been obscured by deep snow for quite some time, so I didn't expect to see anything worthwhile on the memory card. I was wrong. Just over a month ago, we finally got our snowshoe hare on camera in his winter phase (11 sec):



    Huzzah!
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2021-Mar-28 at 03:59 AM.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  30. #1740
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,601
    On our ride this morning we went past a golf course about 6 km from home. A mob of kangaroos have lived there for years, they love the grass, and today one looked like he had come through a hole in the fence and forgotten were it was - they are not the smartest of animals. This course is about 21 km from the centre of Perth and with the urban sprawl these days is pretty much in the inner suburbs.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG20210328091040 (2).jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	1.11 MB 
ID:	25996

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG20210328091125 (2).jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	1.49 MB 
ID:	25997

Similar Threads

  1. Cool Australian wildlife
    By bloodhound31 in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2011-Oct-11, 10:41 PM
  2. How To See NanoSail-D From Your Own Backyard
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2011-Mar-02, 01:35 AM
  3. Impact of cell towers on wildlife
    By Sticks in forum Science and Technology
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 2010-Jan-10, 08:34 PM
  4. Backyard Observatory.
    By etimmerAZ in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2005-Nov-22, 09:00 PM
  5. BACKYARD ASTRONOMY
    By mars44 in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 2004-Jan-21, 08:55 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •