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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1531
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Tomorrow I will probably go to the hardware store and pickup an epoxy kit for fixing pipes we need it fixed soon. Maybe in the future I might teach myself how to solder but not right now.
    I know how to solder electronics, but soldering plumbing is quite a different technique. And like with all things soldering/welding: it looks so easy when you see a professional doing it...until you try it yourself. I'd do the same thing in your situation: fix it now and leave the new skills for a less urgent situation.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  2. #1532
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    BTW, why do they make screws that will only go into pre-drilled holes in sheet metal or sheet plastic pointy as if they were going to need to drill their own holes?
    They do make screws without points for that purpose. They're typically called "machine screws".

    The question is why whoever put your liner in didn't use them.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  3. #1533
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    They do make screws without points for that purpose. They're typically called "machine screws".

    The question is why whoever put your liner in didn't use them.
    I thought machine screws were used in threaded holes or needed a nut on the other side.

    Maybe the points on sheet metal screws make it easier to align with the holes.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  4. #1534
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    Yes, machine screws need pre-made standard threads. What Delvo has are self-tapping sheet metal screws. They do need a drilled hole, but provide better security than self-drilling screws, which are also available.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  5. #1535
    Well the brother-in-law showed up this morning and found the pipe from the faucet to the shower has to be replace, he happens to have a piece similar to it. So tomorrow after this afternoon he finishes another project and gathers the materials and tools we will be fixing it. But it will probably take most of the day, a sink has to come out the pipe has to come out.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  6. #1536
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Yes, machine screws need pre-made standard threads. What Delvo has are self-tapping sheet metal screws. They do need a drilled hole, but provide better security than self-drilling screws, which are also available.
    Ah, yes they're tapered because the predrilled hole needs to be smaller than the desired final diameter, so the screw can widen it.

    But how do self-tapping provide better security than self-drilling?
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  7. #1537
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    The self-drilling, I think, make somewhat messy and ragged holes. They are often used, however, in automated assembly.

    ETA: Of course, if you do the wrong size pilot hole for the self-tapping, they won't be much good either.
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2021-Oct-07 at 02:37 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #1538
    Well the shower is fixed.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  9. #1539
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I know how to solder electronics, but soldering plumbing is quite a different technique. And like with all things soldering/welding: it looks so easy when you see a professional doing it...until you try it yourself. I'd do the same thing in your situation: fix it now and leave the new skills for a less urgent situation.
    I can solder plumbing but not electronics. Every once in a while, I will try to touch a freshly soldered part barehanded. My friend marvels at this personal flaw. "How can you do that and then do that???. I don't know.
    Solfe

  10. #1540
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    I have the opposite: when soldering electronics, you often have to hold slightly too hot parts. After a while, you get accustomed to it. Now people marvel at how I'm able to hold onto hot things. Of course, I too have my limits and touching a freshly heat soaked copper water pipe would be a bad, painful idea.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  11. #1541
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    I'm about to take out my truck's bed liner... Try to find out how to do that online, and you'll find three kinds of methods for either of two kinds of liner:

    1. For a spray-on liner, soften it with a heat gun, and scrape it off with a plastic scraper.

    2. For a spray-on liner, soften it with a chemical solvent such as CitriStrip (active ingredient: citric acid), and scrape it off with a plastic scraper.

    3. For a drop-in liner, unhook & disconnect whatever doodads are holding it down at various attachment points, and lift it out, which is likely to involve pulling up on it so hard that it bends if it's tucked tightly into corners.

    So, of course, mine is neither spray-on nor drop-in. Or you could say it's both.
    Well, CitriStrip was no good. I can see that it would have been, for a thinner later of spray-on stuff, because I did make some progress at a thin edge, but it didn't take long to get to areas where it was just too thick, and then all I could do was fight for just little flakes of removed liner at a time while deforming the edge of my plastic scraper. This stuff I have was just sprayed on entirely too thick for this in most places, including up to the equivalent of the solid corrugated floor panel in thickness right next to the panel, and CitriStrip doesn't seem to have had any softening/weakening effect on the thicker areas. It was very good at turning the liner orange-pink and putting spots on clothes where I can't believe it ever really even touched the clothes, though.

    So I got a heat gun, but haven't tried it yet. I was too aggravated to even think about the subject anymore once I got home.

    I did find out that the stuff that looks like tar joining the floor panel to the adjacent sprayed sections can be cut & pried off (and the CitriStrip might have helped slightly with that). But you can't just get it started and then peel the rest of its length up like a rope. It's a bunch of work going inch by inch to break off little bits at a time, at least without the heat gun. Once you get the first couple of inches out, even pulling the corner of the panel up with a crowbar doesn't help with that third inch of pseudo-tar; it just bends the panel corner.

  12. #1542
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    I've finally started repairing the front fence. It's just wooden slats fixed to wooden uprights which are in turn fixed to brick pillars. The pillars are built on top of a brick wall. So, I tried unscrewing the slats but the screws are so corroded that they break or round out. So I tried removing the uprights from the pillars, same problem. So I finally decided to just break the wooden parts away from the pillars.
    Oops.
    Not one of the 6 brick pillars was actually secured to the wall any more. They used to be, but bending and flexing the wood made the pillars rock alarmingly. So I took the only reasonable course of action and pulled the whole lot off the wall.

    It may be possible to reaffix the pillars with some mortar but they are pretty heavy as they are around 8 courses of brick high. Not doing that by myself.
    So I've ordered some fence posts to screw to the remaining wall and boards to fill the gaps. It's probably worked out better as the pillars had different distances between them making cutting the panels a pain. Plus the wall has a public footpath on one side which made having loose brickwork quite dangerous.

    The posts and boards arrive today. What could possibly go wrong...

  13. #1543
    This afternoon replace a glass window with a piece of plexi glass, there is a second to do but ran out of glazing putty.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  14. #1544
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    I have a bunch of people coming in to do the asbestos removal. File under "not DIY". All I need to do is make sure the power and water are on then give them a key. They don't even want me around. Me, either.

    I mention this only because I installed a crazy amount of shutoff values when I moved in: Bathroom sink and shower, toilet (didn't have one, should have), kitchen sink, basement sink, and hot water tank. The other detail is, the copper pipes burned in the back half of the house. All that is left of those are jagged ribbons of copper on the floor or stuck to the ceiling.

    I'm a smidgen nervous that the shut offs I installed two decades ago are the only thing keeping the house from flooding when the water is turned back on. The plumber said they looked good and he'll be on hand when they turn everything on. He did cap off the supply line to back water spigot and two lines going to the basement sink. The pipes leading to the shut offs were roasted. I have my fingers crossed.
    Solfe

  15. #1545
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    Dec 2007
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    I'm converting a piece of furniture I built years ago into an air filtration unit, similar to the end table I made last year. The piece was originally designed as a TV console, holding all the various electronic devices that supported TV watching. It's now located at the end of the bed. We get a lot of wildfire smoke in these parts so I've made two pieces that incorporate an ultra quiet bathroom exhaust fan and a near HEPA filter. This will be the third with another in the pipeline (to be donated to a neighbor). I don't know how effective they are in removing smoke particles but the filter ratings and the amount of air the fan moves suggests they help. Hard to say how much without air quality data.

    Anyway, the fan & filter will occupy half of the lower left portion of the piece, with a door to access the filter. Air will be drawn in through the filter from the right side of the piece (and thus, the room) and will exhaust through the end panel on the left. With the other two units, I attached a 4 inch flexible hose to deliver the fan exhaust to the other side of the room to promote good circulation. Here, I think there will be good enough separation between inlet and exhaust to not need a hose. As a bonus, this project has allowed me to use my handheld router for the first time. Used it to route the door and stile for hinges.

    I'd post images but the forum doesn't seem to want to let me.

  16. #1546
    I really realy don't like getting on a roof. But there was some roofing material that was loose on top of the porch that had to be nailed down before the next storm which will get a little of tomorrow but most of it will hit Nova Scotia. IK need a cookie and a drink.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  17. #1547
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    I really realy don't like getting on a roof. But there was some roofing material that was loose on top of the porch that had to be nailed down before the next storm which will get a little of tomorrow but most of it will hit Nova Scotia. IK need a cookie and a drink.
    Don't get on the roof.
    Been there, fell off that.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #1548
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I'm converting a piece of furniture I built years ago into an air filtration unit...
    It's complete and turned out quite well except for staining the new door. The original piece was built of various scraps I had in the workshop so I had stained the whole thing (except the top, which is wenge) with a dark stain in an attempt to get them to blend. I forget what stain exactly; it's been a few years. Matching the new door, which is of yet another wood species, proved challenging and it's quite obvious the door is an add-on. Still, a success, I think. Next up is an air filtration unit/end table for my neighbor.

  19. #1549
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    Ha ha. I keep all sorts of scraps and have tried to incorporate them into projects too.

    The last thing I made was a small dust collector intended to demonstrate a physics phenomenon that I'd seen in a YouTube video. That was made of small scraps of mahogany, maple and cherry. If uploading pictures to this site becomes possible again I'll post some.

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