Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 94

Thread: To Sci-Fi Writers...

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,273
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I'm interested.
    Assuming you are referring to my Season Seven Mystical Realms story, this is the link

    I also did a trailer prior to starting that story line which I put on Youtube, as the forum I posted it on can embed youtube clips. (Bonus points if you can say which planet is actually depicted in the final animation sequence of the trailer )

    Of course if anyone has a problem with these links, as some of the storyline in parts might be considered to have adult or disturbing content, although it never raised concerns with the moderators over there, I will remove them ASAP

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,959
    Okay, that was the craziest (in a good way), most exciting thing I've read all week. Thank you.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    337
    Some of us don't mind adult or disturbing content - the only censorship I need resides at the tips of my fingers (the ones that operate the power switch, channel selector, mouse etc...)

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,273
    Oops my last post did not have the link to the trailer

    Here is the trailer to season seven

    I am planning a season eight, believe it or not, and I made a trailer for that, here

    On a general point, if you follow a franchise, as I have and Asimov did with his foundation series, does that make things easier than doing separate independent stories?

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,959
    Oooh, that last trailer is creepy!
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,273
    The most interesting part of season seven was the research into the Soviet Space programme and the personalities as well as the vehicles used. I also had a thread going here for a while discussing the idea I used in my episode one, of could the Soviets have done what I had them trying to do. Without spoiling it for others, do ou think I depicted that idea ok?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,273
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Oooh, that last trailer is creepy!
    It was meant to be

    My super villain for season eight is going to be...

    On second thoughts I will keep that under my hat


  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,959
    Without spoiling it for others, do you think I depicted that idea ok?
    The Russian program isn't my area of expertise (although I'm trying to learn all that I can), but nothing seemed particularly outlandish until the part that was supposed to be outlandish.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    4,101
    Few days ago I was quite sick, and experienced what some writers call "Fevered Dream". Well, not exactly a dream since it was not visual, but more like a story jelled in my mind. Next day I wrote it down. Here it is:

    I admit it is a bit disturbing

    BTW, the file is Microsoft Word 2007. I do not know how it will come out on earlier versions of Word.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    4,101
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Oooh, that last trailer is creepy!
    Word "Lovecraftian" comes to mind.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,273
    Just for sake of interest, I have finished my season eight here

    Of course as with the other one, if anyone has a problem with this link, as some of the storyline in parts might be considered to have adult or disturbing content, although it never raised concerns with the moderators over there, I will remove it ASAP

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,287
    How Three Book Series Kept Readers Interested

    https://mythcreants.com/blog/how-thr...rs-interested/

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,849
    Off-topic, but I find it interesting to scroll through old threads like this and note the names of folks who are, or are not, around these days. This one includes one "honored member", one banned member, and a mod who hasn't posted since last August!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Off-topic, but I find it interesting to scroll through old threads like this and note the names of folks who are, or are not, around these days. This one includes one "honored member", one banned member, and a mod who hasn't posted since last August!
    And just went thru to see who were talking about.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    I've talked extensively about my on-again-off-again writing efforts.

    As far as hardness of science, I usually try to adapt fantastic elements (magic, powers, FTL, etc) against an otherwise realistic background. I start with the assumption that our known science is valid as far as it goes, then add-on explanations that don't seem to contradict established laws that a smart reader may be familiar with. I try to come up with reasons why we have not observed evidence of wormholes or aliens or a multiverse. Even if rules and explanations are never spelled out in detail in story, I always aim for consistency.

    For hard-SF technologies, I use the general capacity of advanced tech without going into detail because I am not anything close to an expert. If a real scientist or engineer says that a particular system might someday be capable of X, I often assume at best 80% X gets into useful application. If I avoid a certain path or tech tree for story purposes, I give a valid reason why... AI hits a dead end because a conscious computer suffers from inevitable information overload leading to a breakdown. Nanobots are banned and feared because a Grey Goo meltdown almost destroys the Earth. Genetically enhanced humans cause a world war, so they are taboo in the Federation of Planets... oh, wait.

    With nonhuman species, I always make sure they're not too human, but not so different mentally that a reader can't relate. For simplicity I avoid making a whole alien smorgasbord and focus on one or two other sentients. If using humans not of Earth, I make sure their culture takes into account all the differences in viewpoint cultures make on our world and all the universalities of human societies.

    For simplicity's sake if humans can live on a world, not just breathe the air but settle on it for generations, assume there's some kind of link to Earth life: terraforming, engineering, or shared origin of some kind. I don't want Star Wars syndrome where total aliens can eat each other's food and each other.

    Verisimilitude is more important than technical accuracy, but I like technical accuracy when it doesn't interfere with a concept like wizards or telepaths or superheroes or interstellar jump drives.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  16. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,851
    Quote Originally Posted by Launch window View Post
    How Three Book Series Kept Readers Interested

    https://mythcreants.com/blog/how-thr...rs-interested/
    They mention three series:

    (1) The Murderbot Diaries
    (2) The Expanse
    (3) Legend

    Of the three, Iím only familiar with The Expanse and I stopped after the first book. Iíve liked the TV series more, though it still has issues. Iíve talked about this before, but the book has some of the wallpaper I would expect in a hard science fiction book, but itís not hard science fiction (when I saw it on Amazon, it was billed as hard SF and they would have been better off not claiming that) and I had some eye rolls at some of the stuff in the book. Then there were things like the space zombies that really annoyed me. Iíve had enough of the zombie trope to last me a lifetime. There are other issues, but Iím not getting into them. I finished the book, but didnít want to continue.

    Anyway, the point is, if you want to keep people interested in a series, you have to get them hooked in the first place.

    I havenít heard of the other two series. (1) sounds like it might be interesting but I wouldnít be interested in (3). Iíve had enough of dystopias too, especially post-collapse US stories *unless* it involves something like advanced and pleasant off-world colonies that are trying to bring Earth out of its dark age. But generally Iíve had enough of downer stories.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  17. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    8,805
    I've written a few space zombie stories myself, in a relatively hard SF context (Orion's Arm).

    Thing is, the original concept of a zombie in mythology was more like an undead slave rather than a shambling brain-cannibal. I can see a lot of potential uses for a technologically-revived obedient human servant, especially as some kind of spy or fifth columnist .

    On the other hand the SF trope where a member of the crew gets taken over by an antagonistic agent has been done to death (so to speak). It happened a lot on Star Trek, and even more on the ancient TV series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea where it seemed that every week one or another of the crew of that unfortunate submarine was taken over by an enemy or alien. Often with hilarious results.

  18. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,851
    Right, I should have mentioned I was referring to the modern zombie concept. One of the last examples I can think of for the original zombie concept in fiction was in an episode of Kolchak the Night Stalker. Iím just really tired of the modern zombie trope, and the game Mass Effect had space zombies before the Expanse, so it felt like I had just seen this when reading the book.

    Another one that annoys me is time travel, unless the author manages to get a new and interesting take on it. Time travel stories are really hard to do well, and especially in Star Trek are almost always a disaster. They use time travel every time they write themselves into a corner or want to do something dramatic with an easy reset.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  19. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Right, I should have mentioned I was referring to the modern zombie concept. One of the last examples I can think of for the original zombie concept in fiction was in an episode of Kolchak the Night Stalker.
    The Serpent And The Rainbow?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  20. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,851
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    The Serpent And The Rainbow?
    Looks like it. I didn’t remember it and had to look it up. I think I might have seen it, but if I did it didn’t make a big impression. I did have a vague memory of a movie with a more realistic take on the subject with someone being alive but drugged. I thought whatever I remembered was supposed to be one of those “based on real events” things, not outright fiction though.

    Anyway, there probably are more still, but Kolchak was the one that I remembered. Certainly they are rare.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  21. #51
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    The originator of "modern" cinematic zombie tropes, Dawn Of The Dead, did not use the Z word. The undead of the film were more rightfully modeled on a mix of zombies, and ghouls (Middle Eastern graveyard monsters).
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  22. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,851
    Yep, but that is the word that stuck and now people rarely think about what ďzombieĒ originally referred to, which is a little sad. It was good material for stories too.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  23. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I thought whatever I remembered was supposed to be one of those “based on real events” things, not outright fiction though.
    Well, as based on real events as Disney's Pocahontas, anyway.

    The film was extremely loosely inspired by a book documenting the now debunked story of Clairvius Narcisse, a Haitian national supposedly drugged and enslaved. Naturally the film substituted a white American and added magic and boilerplate action-adventure.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  24. #54
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    As far as The Expanse et al, advanced contagious nanotech is about the only non-fantasy explanation for modern "zombies" that makes sense anyway. At least they aren't shambling and moaning about brains.

    And I agree, the show has some trappings of hard SF, but it veers off the mark right from the start. The marketers that labeled it "hard" probably saw acceleration used instead of artificial gravity, and life support based on recycling instead of replicators (waste not, want not!) and that was that. But crumbs don't make the banquet. Interstellar had a real physics expert advising it and still fell far short of hard science fiction! Turns out he was just there to justify the advertising budget and give the film nerd cred.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  25. #55
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,477
    I suspect there's no profitable TV/movie market for properly hard science fiction set in space. Producers and directors don't want to spend large amounts of money on special effects that merely confuse most of their audience.
    The Expanse's single effort to portray the Coriolis effect was clunky and pointless and inaccurate, for instance. (But then again, there's some sort of cosmic rule stipulating that all SF writers must get the Coriolis and centrifugal pseudoforces wrong at some point--Alastair Reynolds and Stephen Baxter are just the first two well-qualified examples that come to mind.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  26. #56
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I suspect there's no profitable TV/movie market for properly hard science fiction set in space. Producers and directors don't want to spend large amounts of money on special effects that merely confuse most of their audience.
    I think it's more a matter of executives who are confused by the concepts themselves, or just don't care. Show Business as it stands is not about artistic merit, it's convincing someone in power to back your project or make a deal of some sort. I'm surprised any decent shows get made under the prevailing culture.

    A popular and successful show has been made about the Devil solving murders. If that can happen, a good show based on a hard-SF space future could definitely become a reality.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  27. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,477
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    A popular and successful show has been made about the Devil solving murders. If that can happen, a good show based on a hard-SF space future could definitely become a reality.
    I can't see how one would imply the other, I'm afraid.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  28. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,799
    In this same theme we watched Stowaway last night and found it OK albeit full of cat-sized plot holes. Still, the producers gave it a shot by introducing artificial gravity with a tether-based setup, a Mars cycler and even a detail such as astronauts preparing for EVA by breathing O2 for a period of time before suiting up (which was never explained - twice - so the average viewer was probably baffled as to why Anna Kendrick was huffing on an O2 facemask). To their credit Scott Manley was engaged to provide some input on the tether method and other items. But it's difficult for film producers to accurately depict the realities of space flight, or in some cases (I'm looking at you Andy Weir) the writer deliberately ignores reality to make a story. Even Stanley Kubrick, try as he might, could not get every detail right in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    ETA:
    And from the user reviews I've read many were confused by what they were seeing, although to space junkies it made sense.

  29. #59
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I can't see how one would imply the other, I'm afraid.

    Grant Hutchison
    It means, there's unlimited possibilities for success.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  30. #60
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,477
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    It means, there's unlimited possibilities for success.
    And I meant to indicate that I don't believe that's true.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

Similar Threads

  1. I'm Looking for More Writers
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Sep-07, 04:04 PM
  2. Discussion: I'm Looking for More Writers
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 2005-May-26, 08:06 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •