Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 121 to 150 of 190

Thread: The name of a book/story, please

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    3,091
    Nope, neither one. Clash of the Titans is too new, and the thing in Jason is a hydra.

    Fred
    Hey, you! "It's" with an apostrophe means "it is" or "it has." "Its" without an apostrophe means "belongs to it."

    "For shame, gentlemen, pack your evidence a little better against another time."
    -- John Dryden, "The Vindication of The Duke of Guise" 1684

    Earth's sole legacy will be a very slight increase (0.01%) of the solar metallicity.

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    721

    ToSeek?

    ToSeek, is this the book you were thinking of?

    http://www.amazon.com/Demolished-Man...=cm_lmf_tit_11
    Last edited by nosbig5; 2011-Nov-01 at 08:59 PM.

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    3,091
    No, it wasn't, as I said 18 months ago.

    Fred
    Hey, you! "It's" with an apostrophe means "it is" or "it has." "Its" without an apostrophe means "belongs to it."

    "For shame, gentlemen, pack your evidence a little better against another time."
    -- John Dryden, "The Vindication of The Duke of Guise" 1684

    Earth's sole legacy will be a very slight increase (0.01%) of the solar metallicity.

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    721
    Okay, I skimmed through the posts a little too quickly, missed that one.

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    157
    Another resource for those trying to identify a book/story:

    http://scifi.stackexchange.com/quest...identification

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    30,138
    Quote Originally Posted by ToSeek View Post
    Good idea - done!

    And here's one I've been trying to track down: it takes place on a humanoid world other than Earth where everyone is telepathic and where your status in society is determined by the number of people you can telepathically control. The elites are up around 80, while the worst-off people have some ability but can't control anyone. There are a few people who have no ability whatsoever, and they're exempt from this hierarchy. The main character is sent from Earth to investigate a murder or some other crime. I don't remember too much of the plot, though I do recall that the cover featured a particularly well-formed young woman in a tight-fitting catsuit (apparently the de rigueur mode of dress) with a number above her left breast indicating her status. Thanks for any help anyone can give.
    Bolasanibk's link came through for me - it's The Mind Traders, by J. Hunter Holly, with the cover I remember so fondly.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,623
    Not a book but a movie that came out in the late 70's. It had two robots. One looked like a salt shaker and the other was a brass humanoid that acted like Jerry Seinfeld. It had an naive teenager, a smuggler hero-type, a mouthy princess, and a bad guy in black that had an eerie voice and strange magical powers. Lots of laser fights and space battles with good special effects.

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    893

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    a long way away
    Posts
    10,993
    I was reminded recently of a story I read decades ago which had some kind of alien life-form which was a bit like giant dandelion seeds that drafted between star systems. I don't remember if they played an important role in the story or were mere incidental detail intended to add verisimilitude to an otherwise bald and unconvincing narrative...

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    13,886
    Larry Niven's Known Space stories sometimes mentioned starseeds, huge creatures that had a life cycle taking them from the galactic core to the rim and back. There was a scene in a Beowulf Shaeffer story, Grendel, where a starship stopped to watch one unfold its light sail.

  11. #131
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    a long way away
    Posts
    10,993
    Ah. Thank you. I had a vague idea it might be Niven but couldn't remember anything specific.

    (I just Googled "starseed" to find out more and opened the door to a whole new world of craziness ... )

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,623
    No, it wasn't Ice Pirates. The mouthy princess was one of the good guys. It had a few sequels and prequels since, and in one of them she turns out to be the daughter of the one of the bad guys, and the brother of one of the good guys.

  13. #133
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    11,057
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinemarten View Post
    she turns out to be the daughter of the one of the bad guys, and the brother of one of the good guys.
    Is this a typo, or is there some gender bending (a la The Wasp Factory) going on?

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,623
    Typo, one of the good guys was her twin brother, sorry.

  15. #135
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,266
    Star Wars?
    Solfe

  16. #136
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,275
    Naw... couldn't be.

  17. #137
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    893
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Star Wars?
    Certainly fits, but you wouldn't place that into the forgettable category of movies, would you? I guess it could happen.

    I had figured Ice Pirates was a good match, since it was more obscure and an obvious satire of the Star Wars type movie.

  18. #138
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,623
    That's it. Star Wars. Seems the simple names are easy to forget. I will always remember ones like 'Happy Birthday Wanda June' , and the prequel "Wanda June Goes to the Store Alone'.

  19. #139
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    60 miles north of Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    1,705
    I read a short story in either Asimov's or Analog about 10-15 years ago that dealt with the far-future descendants of humanity. This story had only two characters who were travelling on different ships. In this future, humans were practically immortal and travelled the cosmos on energy highways at close to light speed.

    The story focused on the debate between the two people about whether it was proper for one of them to deflect an incoming asteroid from a planet that had the beginnings of civilization. I loved the story and kept that issue for years, but I think my wife may have thrown it out. Does it sound even remotely familiar to anyone? I don't remember which magazine it was in or even the year so I'm having a tough time finding it.

  20. #140
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,328
    I remember reading two stories about aliens with FTL but missing fairly noticeable hunks of Earth-like technology.

    One (I have no memory at all of the writer) involved human-like aliens who had FTL or space warp drive (iirc, their space ships were lit by oil lamps ) but their military technology was 17th Century. When they landed and tried volley fire on the VIPs meeting them, it did not go well when some of the national guard troops fired back (M-16 beats muzzle-loading match loader....).

    The second was, I think it was by Asimov, had FTL, an actual space empire, and their technology was roughly equivalent but their ability to mass produce precision goods was nil.

    Any ideas about either?
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  21. #141
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    One (I have no memory at all of the writer) involved human-like aliens who had FTL or space warp drive (iirc, their space ships were lit by oil lamps ) but their military technology was 17th Century. When they landed and tried volley fire on the VIPs meeting them, it did not go well when some of the national guard troops fired back (M-16 beats muzzle-loading match loader....).
    That I think is 'The Road Not Taken' by Harry Turtledove.

  22. #142
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,328
    Quote Originally Posted by Kadava View Post
    That I think is 'The Road Not Taken' by Harry Turtledove.

    Thanks. Sounds like something Turtledove would write.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  23. #143
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    8,935
    Okay, I just happened to think about this, so I figured I'd post it here.

    I saw a movie on TV (I don't know if it was a made-for-TV movie or not), late 70s or early 80s, but I can only remember one specific scene from it - and even that, I'm not sure how accurate my memory is. A character's toothpaste had been tampered with (some kind of chemical or toxic waste), and when the effects finally hit it caused his stomach to split open and his intestines to spill out. Again, this was on TV, so I'm sure it was mostly implied and not real graphic.

    If I'm remembering correctly, the actor was kind of portly, like a Charles Durning or Hoyt Axton. The "gut-spilling" scene took place outdoors, on a road. I think he was trying to drive himself to the doctor and stopped and got out of the car because of the pain.

    Anybody have any memory of anything like this?

    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  24. #144
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    8,935
    FWIW, someone on another board identified my movie as "Endangered Species," a 1982 flick starting Robert Urich.

    Going by IMDB, Hoyt Axton was in it, and his character ended up with a ruptured abdominal cavity after using tainted toothpaste. So while the title does not cause an "ah-ha!" reaction from me, it does appear that that's the movie I saw.

    Now I just have to find a copy somewhere...
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  25. #145
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,328
    I'm looking for the title of a story -- I think it was by Mack Reynolds -- where the basis was a comedian (who was, during the story, kidnapped and mutilated by a terrorist) convinces the media to report all incidents involving terrorists as if the terrorist was a buffoon.

    I think one of the characters was named "Charlie George," and there was a line involving a young child killed by the terrorist as she saw him when he was escaping. The comment was something like "of course he shot her for knowing too much; she was all of 5."
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  26. #146
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    I'm looking for the title of a story -- I think it was by Mack Reynolds -- where the basis was a comedian (who was, during the story, kidnapped and mutilated by a terrorist) convinces the media to report all incidents involving terrorists as if the terrorist was a buffoon.

    I think one of the characters was named "Charlie George," and there was a line involving a young child killed by the terrorist as she saw him when he was escaping. The comment was something like "of course he shot her for knowing too much; she was all of 5."
    That sounds like a novel by Dean Ing, I think Soft Targets.
    "It's not the things we don't know that hurt us, It's the things we do know that aren't so.” --Artemus Ward

    “It never ceases to amaze me how utterly unintelligent a person can be and still believe they are somehow accomplishing something.” --Interdimensional Warrior

  27. #147
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,328
    Soft Targets sounds like it came out at around the right time. Might be it.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  28. #148
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    The Space Coast
    Posts
    4,682
    A great many years ago, I had a large number of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction magazines (which I regret donating now). One story in one issue was essentially a fictionalized account of Walt Disney meeting Salvador Dali. The story moved back and forth between Disney's travel to Dali's home and studio (and back home) and basically Mickey traveling through a disturbing, surrealist world. It plays on the urban legend of Disney being cryogenically "preserved" and is paralleled in Mickey's adventures by having the poor mouse nearly frozen in time as he's being pulled destroyed by his presence in the surrealist world. Two things from the story stand out for me. One is that Dali tells Disney he won't work with him because "There is no death in your work," and there's a tree outside Dali's home that is trimmed precisely so that for a couple of minutes each day its shadow forms the portrait of Voltaire, Dali's "friend of the afternoon." The story is also clever in that Disney, Dali and Mickey are never referred to by their names (probably due to legal and copyright issues), but you quickly figure out who is being referred to.

    Does anyone here know what story that is and/or (even better) have the story? I'm trying to track it down to have someone I know (as well as myself) read it.

    Edited to add: this would be 1980s/1990s time frame.

    Thanks,
    CJSF
    "The sun is a quagmire
    It's not made of fire
    Forget what you've been told in the past
    Electrons are free
    (Plasma!) Fourth state of matter
    Not gas, not liquid, not solid"

    -They Might Be Giants, "Why Does The Sun Really Shine?"


    lonelybirder.org

  29. #149
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    120
    I remember a book a school friend had, (circa 1980) which was a pictorial of bestiary of dangerous alien species. They included things like carnivorous trees, a spiky thing like a giant porcupine, a giant spacefaring brain in a bubble, things with giant mouths which could produce sound that could kill, and one warlike species called "The Humans"...

    The premise was that it had been decoded from a capsule that had been recovered near, or had landed on the Island of Gan in the Indian ocean.

    Problem was, I think it was called something quite generic like "The Aliens" so Googling it throws up millions of unrelated hits, which isn't much help!

  30. #150
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    11,057
    Barlowe's Guide To Extraterrestrials, perhaps?

Similar Threads

  1. New type of energy for a comic book story?
    By dashell in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 2010-Apr-15, 05:53 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Sep-13, 12:49 AM
  3. Book Review: Story - The Way of Water
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Sep-09, 02:25 AM
  4. Discussion: Book Review: Story - The Way of Water
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Jun-21, 06:15 PM
  5. Book Review: Story - The Way of Water
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Jun-21, 11:09 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •