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Thread: $5.33 a Gallon in Redwood City

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Supreme Canuck View Post
    Here's the thing, though - North America is, on average, less dense and cooler than Europe. I can tell you for a fact that Canadians use the most fossil fuel in the world per capita. Why? It's bloody cold in the winter and we have a lot of land to drive over. I'm certain that the northern United States (not to mention Alaska) is in a similar situation.
    Indeed!!

    Unlike Scotland (a previous comment I addressed), which is the size of a postage stamp compared to the U.S., if I want to see relatives I must drive and/or fly at least 900 miles. That's my closest relative, mind you. Sister lives 1,050 miles away.

    Also, many U.S. cities have lots of urban sprawl.

    I live in the desert southwest; the nearest city next to mine is 45 miles away, the nearest town to the west is 60 miles.

    So yeah...lots of things must be factored in here.

    I drive an economy car and fortunately I have an in-home job, thank God!

    Be grateful if you live in a TINY nation with your kin close by!
    Last edited by Nadme; 2008-Jun-11 at 06:41 PM. Reason: correction

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lianachan View Post

    I think UK based people would be absolutely delighted to be paying 72p a litre for their fuel.
    Europe drive more fuel efficient cars, most UK people drive a car with good mileage. Try driving a big American Cadillac, Mercury Cougar or Chrysler Newport and see how far you get down the road before you're out of gas on those prices. There is a reason the US public are dumping the traditional American vehicle and buying fuel efficient cars

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Supreme Canuck View Post
    Why? It's bloody cold in the winter and we have a lot of land to drive over.
    And less high-density housing. As I've heard it, large, semi-cold US cities like New York, use less fuel per capita for heating because so many many people are packed into large buildings with low surface area per resident to let it escape. Huddle together, more, Canada!
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    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  4. #34
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    Tiny nation with my relatives close by indeed. Nonsense. 3 hour drive to my closest, the 1st on single track roads. I have to drive to get anywhere at all. No public transport options. At all. No option but oil for central heating. High oil prices hit me hard.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Launching View Post
    I think UK based people would be absolutely delighted to be paying 72p a litre for their fuel.
    Too right!!!!!!!!!!!! We are paying around 1.30 per litre on average, high cost road tax (depending on the size of the vehicle) and very high insurance premiums. I think the rest of Europe are paying high prices too.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nadme View Post
    Indeed!!

    Unlike Scotland (a previous comment I addressed), which is the size of a postage stamp compared to the U.S., if I want to see relatives I must drive and/or fly at least 900 miles. That's my closest relative, mind you. Sister lives 1,050 miles away.

    Also, many U.S. cities have lots of urban sprawl.

    I live in the desert southwest; the nearest city next to mine is 45 miles away, the nearest town to the west is 60 miles.

    So yeah...lots of things must be factored in here.

    I drive an economy car and fortunately I have an in-home job, thank God!

    Be grateful if you live in a TINY nation with your kin close by!
    Exactly why there is a greater reason for larger size countries to use more fuel efficient vehicles!!!! It makes no sense to use a "gas guzzler" to go large distances wasting valuable fossil fuels and causing greater damage to the environment!!!!

  7. #37
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    Folks! It's all relative. No matter what we pay compared to the rest of you (and I'll be the first to admit that we in the US have historically paid less than most of the world) the fact is that our prices have doubled in the last 18 months! That steep a rise is a shock, especially for what most of us consider a necessity.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaptain K View Post
    Folks! It's all relative. No matter what we pay compared to the rest of you (and I'll be the first to admit that we in the US have historically paid less than most of the world) the fact is that our prices have doubled in the last 18 months! That steep a rise is a shock, especially for what most of us consider a necessity.
    Ours have nearly doubled and are set to go from 90p per litre last year to 2.30 very soon ! i think its a shock all round!!!!

  9. #39
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    My original post was in response to an announcement that a commodity was now for sale somewhere for a specific, named, price. All I have done is point out that that specific price is still far short of the prices I've been paying for that same commodity for years now. I've not made any wild assumptions about what the impact of the social climate and/or geography any other country has on relative consumption, and don't care much for such assumptions about mine. It's irrelevant to what I was saying, as I was commenting only on the price for a specific volume regardless of how long it lasts.

    Had the opening post said "I'm now having to spend <amount> per month on fuel!" or something, then some sympathy may have been expressed if appropriate!

    My post #34 was squeezed off quickly, and since I posted from my Sony PSP I was very limited in how much I could say - so I ended up saying nothing I'd intended to.


  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmocrazy View Post
    Exactly why there is a greater reason for larger size countries to use more fuel efficient vehicles!!!! It makes no sense to use a "gas guzzler" to go large distances wasting valuable fossil fuels and causing greater damage to the environment!!!!
    I completely agree with you!

    Huge wasteful vehicles were especially a problem from 2001 - 2005.

    Unfortunately it is still not rare (enough) to see pickup trucks parked at a restaurant...and mostly 1 person per truck.

    And too often I've heard the dumb excuse of "If I get in a wreck I won't be hurt as bad, or die" (as opposed to being in a smaller car). As if anyone is going to live forever anyway.

  11. #41
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    Here it is 1.17 per litre, every thing is so expensive even our gas and electric is through the roof, my grocery shopping has gone up almost 100% too in the last 2 years.
    The real art of conversation is not only saying the right thing at the right moment but also to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the most tempting moment. -- unknown

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmocrazy View Post
    Too right!!!!!!!!!!!! We are paying around 1.30 per litre on average, high cost road tax (depending on the size of the vehicle) and very high insurance premiums. I think the rest of Europe are paying high prices too.
    People have called me many things over the years, but I think Launching is a new one!

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjl View Post
    $5.33?

    Wow - it's around $4.00 here. I know that isn't bad compared to some places (and no, I don't drive a gas guzzler - I drive a subaru outback that gets about 28mpg, and I couldn't use anything smaller), but what is really somewhat surprising is that how cheap it still is here compared to some areas.
    My guess is that he's talking about diesel, while you're talking about regular unleaded gasoline. I'm in Sacramento, which can be a little cheaper than where he's talking about, but usually not all that much. and I'm paying $4.64 right now for premium. However, diesel is over $5.00.

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  14. #44
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    I'm getting a group together to go raid some Australians for their gas. Picked a lonely coastal town and everything. One road through, one small harbor and no airport. All long range communications centrally located for your convience. No guns. No problem. Yay Google Earth!
    We had to get rid of guns because two many people were getting hurt because guns were giving them a false sense of confidence. It's not as if you can stop a dropbear with bullets. Instead we have mastered Steve Irwin-fu. Yes, our stingray defence is a little weak, but we're working on it.

    And small Australian towns do tend to have one or two or more guns. We do have to cull kangaroos and other demonic beasts now and then, and by law it has to be one shot one kill, so accuracy tends to be good.

    Of course it's all moot as you'd never get past our IYPB defence system. That is Invite Yanks to Pub for Beer.

    Anyway, if you tell people your American they might take pity on you and give you some petrol. It's not as if we need it. I just buy a tank a week to soak in it and kill the ticks. My car is powered by a plate spider on a treadmill chasing after a piece of steak on a string.

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nadme View Post
    Indeed!!

    Unlike Scotland (a previous comment I addressed), which is the size of a postage stamp compared to the U.S., if I want to see relatives I must drive and/or fly at least 900 miles. That's my closest relative, mind you. Sister lives 1,050 miles away.

    Also, many U.S. cities have lots of urban sprawl.

    I live in the desert southwest; the nearest city next to mine is 45 miles away, the nearest town to the west is 60 miles.

    So yeah...lots of things must be factored in here.

    I drive an economy car and fortunately I have an in-home job, thank God!

    Be grateful if you live in a TINY nation with your kin close by!

    Sweden is a pretty big nation and my kin is rather further away, in a different nation altogether (almost 2000 km). My BF's closest relative lives 259 km away.
    I commute to work by public transport and take the train whenever possible but when the choice is between 3-4 hours of train and 3 changes or 2,5 hours of car ride I take the car.

    Do you have numbers on NA being cooler than Europe?
    I know you have a very continental climate but it always amazes me how so much of the US is actually south of Europe. Isn't most of the south in the desert belt?


    But that wasn't my point really.

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lianachan View Post
    People have called me many things over the years, but I think Launching is a new one!
    Yeah sos about that, i think my spell check must have picked up your name and i must have changed it by accident.

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01101001 View Post
    And less high-density housing. As I've heard it, large, semi-cold US cities like New York, use less fuel per capita for heating because so many many people are packed into large buildings with low surface area per resident to let it escape. Huddle together, more, Canada!
    That's true. It's also really hard to do. We already have 95% of the population within 2% of our landmass. Trying to move everyone into a crowded, expensive downtown when there's ample cheap land available is... difficult.

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jokergirl View Post
    I know you have a very continental climate but it always amazes me how so much of the US is actually south of Europe. Isn't most of the south in the desert belt?
    No.

    The desertous regions of the US are western Texas (west of Springerville and Austin, roughly)...New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, southeastern California.

    The "Dixie States" are green and very humid.

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by jokergirl View Post
    Do you have numbers on NA being cooler than Europe?
    I know you have a very continental climate but it always amazes me how so much of the US is actually south of Europe. Isn't most of the south in the desert belt?
    It has to do with the Gulf Stream. Warm water just shoots up from the Gulf of Mexico to, well, right about the British Isles. In fact, London, UK is further North than St. John's, Newfoundland. And Newfoundland gets cold in the winter. Heck, Stockholm, Sweden and Whitehorse, Yukon are at the same latitude. Yes, Stockholm gets cold, but have you seen Whitehorse? If Europe didn't have the Gulf Stream, though, it would probably be about as cold as other locations on a similar latitude.

  20. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Supreme Canuck View Post
    It has to do with the Gulf Stream. Warm water just shoots up from the Gulf of Mexico to, well, right about the British Isles. In fact, London, UK is further North than St. John's, Newfoundland. And Newfoundland gets cold in the winter. Heck, Stockholm, Sweden and Whitehorse, Yukon are at the same latitude. Yes, Stockholm gets cold, but have you seen Whitehorse? If Europe didn't have the Gulf Stream, though, it would probably be about as cold as other locations on a similar latitude.
    Yeah, I've often mentioned that around these boards. Scotland has nice sandy beaches in warm seas at the same lattitudes as Canada has polar bears, and that's with the compliments of the Gulf Stream.

  21. #51
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    Yeah, when I visited Scotland I was amazed at how warm it was. And the mediterranean vegetation in some places! (planted, but still.)
    Beautiful place altogether.


  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nadme View Post
    ..........
    The desertous regions of the US are western Texas .............
    emphasis mine
    nice word, Nadme.......haven't come across it before, notme!
    if you made it up, that's really cute!

  23. #53
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    Thread revival for not much reason. I saw this when I was looking for BigDon's brain (and the thread he lost possibly about scans and denial).

    And, it made me long for the time, so shortly ago, when our major economic gripe was merely the high cost of fossil fuel.

    Well, it's a lot cheaper now!

    Yeah!
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    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  24. #54
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    If you miss the high gas prices, don't worry, they'll be back soon enough.

    Btw, today's average price for a liter of premium in Germany was EUR 1.29/l. By today's exchange rate (1 Euro = 1.47 US$), that's US$ 1,896/l. Seeing that there are 3.785 liters in a US gallon, that makes US$ 7,18/gallon.

    US$ 5.33/gallon?

    Your nightmare, my dream.

  25. #55
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    From reading postings in the "Black Monday" thread, if the US Dollar crashes, it will force import prices up, including petroleum and gas.
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  26. #56
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    It's been my obvervation that for your economy to prosper you have to keep gasoline away from the five dollar mark a gallon mark, relative to your local currency and unit of measure.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  27. #57
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    BD, there does seem to be a correlation. But which is cause and which is effect? Right now the economy is down and so are gas prices. The latter could well be the result of the former, rather than the earlier high prices being the cause of the downturn.

    Or, both.

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