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Thread: Read that again?

  1. #361
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    She also recognized him from the picture. There is a chance they did know each other, so he may have known that she was unlikely to hear him as she got out of the car to do what ever it really was.
    I'm Not Evil.
    An evil person would do the things that pop into my head.

  2. #362
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    That would be my point.
    I see praying on a disabled person as a way of knowingly taking advantage of a situation which would make the crime more appalling. I doubt this crook knowingly knew the situation, so I see it as a normal crime (if you understand what I mean)
    Exactly.
    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Lost, but in the neighborhood of someone she knew? What a coincidence. Maybe a friend of a friend, or she wasn't lost (or not very lost). It just seems a little odd for some reason.
    Exactly again.

  3. #363
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    Per my previous post...
    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Survey: Wendy's Drive-Thrus Are Fastest
    Ok; now tell me how long it takes to get the right burger.
    I think we have part of the answer from Carl's/Hardee's

    Fast-food order accuracy rises with English-fluent hiring pool

    "It's a no-brainer," Puzder says. "Hiring people who are fluent in English has always been something we've wanted to do. Now we can."


    So; according to this, it's not that they don't care, they just don't have enough applicants with the qualifications.

  4. #364
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    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  5. #365
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    November 5, 2008
    ... "Governor [X] was not directing staffers to put anything on their personal credit cards, and anything that staffers put on their credit cards has been reimbursed..."...
    Newsweek

  6. #366
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    Arrgh!
    No! They were not!
    It looks like they got rid of that already. Althoug; I have seen that phrasing used a lot as if they meant "literarily" (if that's even a word).

    Quote Originally Posted by sarongsong View Post
    Yep; put is one of those funny words whose tense is hard to nail in some cases. I don't know if that usage is correct, but I probably would have put "had put" in there. I don't know if it's right, but I do think it would be a bit clearer. In fact, I'm not even sure if my sentence was correct.

  7. #367
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    Anymore, literally literally means not literally.

  8. #368
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdvance View Post
    Anymore, literally literally means not literally.
    You have to literally be a rocket scientist to understand that post.

  9. #369
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
    You have to literally be a rocket scientist to understand that post.
    I guess that makes this board a good place to say it then.

    Here's one that's the fault of the reporter and not a quote.
    Chagrin Falls Pumpkin Roll out of control?
    Such citations are typical, but they'll be no punishment for the injury to 47-year-old Robert Bowen. The Solon man was mowed down by two out of control sledders.

  10. #370
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    Such citations are typical, but they'll be no punishment for the injury to 47-year-old Robert Bowen. The Solon man was mowed down by two out of control sledders.
    Naw, not a mistake. The typical citations won't be punishment; the citations are actually vouchers for a free pizza party with an open bar.

  11. #371
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    This one was a tossup on whether it should be here or bad reporting.

    In a review for a glass globe to water plants. (As seen on TV)

    Aqua Globes Claim To Automatically Water Plants

    The package had two glass globes that were heavier than expected.
    And on what basis was the expectation?

    It's a tad confusing as to what constitutes a big plant
    Confusing? To me that means conflicting information, my guess is that it was "unclear" or "lacking".

    Now the grand finale.
    The mum did use all the water, and actually ran out of water on day 12. That caused the blooms to start to turn brown. But Grand said that's normal when you leave a mum inside. In fact, she had another mum that had been watered by hand and had to be thrown away.
    Uhm, if it would do it anyway, then why would the globe cause it?

  12. #372
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    Plows Battle Lake-Effect Snow

    Sure, you can debate the usage of the word, but in this context, the literal definition seems to be most dominant.
    Ashtabula County officials said they had had a ton of cars slipping and sliding.
    That's like what? One subcompact?

  13. #373
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    You mean I actually have to pay attention to the individual weights of items when using the phrase " a ton of [x]"?

    While it may or may not be a bad description, it is a rather unprofessional sentence for a news item.

  14. #374
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
    While it may or may not be a bad description, it is a rather unprofessional sentence for a news item.
    It depends on who the official is...
    If it's the county engineer, then it is unprofessional. He should know the usage of the word ton.
    If it's the jury comissioner, then its...
    ...well
    ...still unprofessional, since she shouldn't have submitted to an interview.

  15. #375
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    Well, really I meant unprofessional for the journalist to write it. It didn't look like it was in quotes, rather a reference to a conversation he/she had with some official. While it may be okay to use a phrase like "we had a ton of cars sliding" in conversation, unless it's a direct quote, the wording could/should have been changed to something that's more professional.

    Just the same way that if I interviewed a WWII vet for my school report (I wish I was back in highschool doing reports!) and the vet said "We lost a ton of soldiers during that first month." I wouldn't be suprised when I got marked off when I submitted a report saying "According to one vet, they lost a ton of soldiers in December alone."

    I, as the interviewer, either need to ask for a more specific number, or if that's not available, change the wording to something like "There were many soldiers lost in the month of December." That's still vague, but doesn't sound like you're talking to some grade-school kid.

  16. #376
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
    Well, really I meant unprofessional for the journalist to write it. It didn't look like it was in quotes, rather a reference to a conversation he/she had with some official...
    Right. In fact, I even call into question whether it was a single conversation with a single official.
    There are many possibilities here, but the reporter is to blame in the end.
    My guess is that the reporter wasn't sure who was interviewed, or even remember the exact words or source of the information.

    And yes, the indirect quotes do get rather intricate. I'm probably wrong, but when there is a direct reference, I tend to let it slide a bit.

    Actually; when I posted this one, I was only thinking that ton is a common measurement for cars, therefore taken in a literal sense. I don't mind ton as a quantity, but not for heavy things.

  17. #377
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    Actually; when I posted this one, I was only thinking that ton is a common measurement for cars, therefore taken in a literal sense. I don't mind ton as a quantity, but not for heavy things.
    Yeah I know; I find that aspect more amusing than anything.

    And as for the "unprofessional wording"; the less than quality writing isn't bad enough that I'd call an article out on that fact alone. Rather, since you had pointed it out for the other reason, I felt compelled to add to the elementary-school'ness of the sentence in publication.

  18. #378
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    Missing 150-Year-Old Tortoise Returns Home
    November 11, 2008
    ...Butch...may be about 100 years old...
    KTVU-TV
    A clear case of time-compression!

  19. #379
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarongsong View Post
    A clear case of time-compression!
    We all know a tortoise moves at relativistic speeds. It's the hare that's slow.

  20. #380
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    This one is a fairly good informative story about snowplowing, but one comment just started me rolling.

    Hire a plow or clear your own driveway: What's the cost
    On the eastside, attorney Craig Brown said that he prefers more control over his snow removal options and avoids the flat rate contract. He even consults the Farmer's Almanac to check the winter forecast before committing to a specific deal.
    He might want to cross reference his data with an astrologer.

    Me? I think I'll check with the weather bureaus. It'll probably be a gamble no matter what anyway.

  21. #381
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    How about the headline on this one:

    Teen Fakes Self-Inflicted Neo-Nazi Attack

    So she just pretended it was self-inflicted?
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  22. #382
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    We all know a tortoise moves at relativistic speeds. It's the hare that's slow.
    Oh, come on, now! We all know that tortoises do not travel at relativistic speeds, just as we know that turtles can't climb fences!

  23. #383
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    Ok; other than the fact that I'm tired of hearing "oooh digital switch" like nobody knows (I'm sure many don't care or are procrastinating), I saw this:

    Big Switch: Will Your TV Be Left In the Dark?
    Will your home be left in the dark?
    It must be a warning that this is a virus. If your TV goes, it's going to spread to all you lamps and appliances.

  24. #384
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    This really isn't in the spirit of the thread; rather a "read it again because... wow..." thing, but I didn't want to start a new thread.

    "Girl protects younger brother as van rolls backwards"

    Basically, while the mother ran inside, the van rolled backwards (popped gear? or forgot to put it in park... whichever). Unfortuantely, it rolled towards a steep hill ("cliff").

    The amazing part is this:
    “She says she tried to turn the wheel so it would go this way into the field. But she said it just kept right on going this way," Katherine’s mom, Sue Whitman told KGW. “Then, she jumped back in her car seat, put her seatbelt back on, took the blanket that was in the back and threw it over her and her brother to protect them from any glass.”
    (my bold) Not really a life-or-death move, but damn smart. I don't think I would have even thought of doing that.

    Oh, and the good news is that the van was recovered and is okay, except a few dents. ...wait, no the good news is both kids were unhurt.

  25. #385
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
    This really isn't in the spirit of the thread; rather a "read it again because... wow..." thing, but I didn't want to start a new thread.

    "Girl protects younger brother as van rolls backwards"

    Basically, while the mother ran inside, the van rolled backwards (popped gear? or forgot to put it in park... whichever). Unfortuantely, it rolled towards a steep hill ("cliff").

    The amazing part is this:

    (my bold) Not really a life-or-death move, but damn smart. I don't think I would have even thought of doing that.

    Oh, and the good news is that the van was recovered and is okay, except a few dents. ...wait, no the good news is both kids were unhurt.
    Six years old! Unbelievable.

  26. #386
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    Okay this one is in the spirit of the thread, but it's not a news item. It's from a company e-mail pertaining to an e-mail virus (alert).

    I can't post the whole e-mail since it's company material, but I can post the offending line. It sure made me smile this morning.

    We often remind Lotus Notes users to never open e-mail coming from an unknown source as these e-mails may be misleading, appearing as if someone you know has sent it to you.
    (My bold). If it appears that someone you know sent it, then it wouldn't be an unknown source ... well, it would be, but you wouldn't know that it was an unknown source. Anyway, you get what I mean.

  27. #387
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    wouldn't it be easier to say "don't use Lotus Notes"?

  28. #388
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdvance View Post
    wouldn't it be easier to say "don't use Lotus Notes"?
    Not when you have millions of employees who all have to be on the same system, and that system is Lotus Notes.

  29. #389
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    Here's another "wish I thought of it" stories.

    A million-dollar biz: Plastic wishbones
    I was thinking of them being a hit with families, but then I got to this...
    The wishbones are a hit with vegetarians and even internationally - turkey is also a Christmas staple for many families.
    I wonder how a vegetarian resolves this with some of the reasons I hear about being a vegetarian. Ok; the "I don't eat meat because of the fats" probably have no issue, but there are others...

  30. #390
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    I wonder how a vegetarian resolves this with some of the reasons I hear about being a vegetarian ...
    Killing is barbaric! But dagnabbit, I really want to break some bonez!!!

    Ok; the "I don't eat meat because of the fats" probably have no issue
    Bah, I might have an embolism if I met a vegetarian that said they don't eat meat only because of the fats. Meats are fatty, but it's the good fat (solong as you don't overdo it, but that applies to everything).

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