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Thread: Read that again?

  1. #3031
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    Yeah -- it reads like the parts that were meant to be deleted were
    the parts that were kept. That isn't hard to do by accident when
    cutting and pasting.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  2. #3032
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    Try reading this garbled sentence from www.webelements.com.

    Gold was discovered by known since ancient times in unknown at not known.

    I kid you not. It is a verbatim copy and paste. This is a scientific website presumably created by educated people, but they must have done some clumsy editing and did not bother with proofreading.
    That looks like some kind of template sentence with variables to be filled in. Either "by so-and-so at someplace" OR "known since ancient times." This one wasn't completed.

  3. #3033
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    Yeah, that's true too....

    AC, DC, either one works....

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  4. #3034
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    From this article, linked to in another thread:

    "The 30-minute chase continued even after Johnson — who drove over spikes set up by officers that ripped off three tires on her pickup truck — ended on a road near South Weber."

    Dropping out the dashed-off subordinate clause, that sentence reads, "The 30-minute chase continued even after Johnson ended on a road near South Weber."
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  5. #3035
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    Iím not sure what they meant to say. Perhaps they mean that she got out of the truck and ran on foot?
    As above, so below

  6. #3036
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    USA Today:
    Seahawks QB Russell Wilson traded to Yankees

    Why would a baseball team need a quarterback?

    Turns out that the Texas Rangers (who must have held his baseball rights) traded him to the Yankees.

  7. #3037
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    You had me worried for about half a second there!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #3038
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    LinkedIn tells us this:

    Google drops $28 for NYC landmark


    Hey, I might match that for a local landmark, but New York? Forget it.

    Didn't Manhattan Island cost only $24 a few years ago?



    Upon closer examination, it's "$2B" which I guess means two billion.

  9. #3039
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    On my drive home, I heard the newsguy state that the late Rev. Billy Graham "ministered to scores of American Presidents."

    The use of the plural would suggest at least two score, but even one score of Presidents takes you back to McKinley circa 1900.

    Talk about hyperbole! I suspect that he was supposed to say "American leaders," or use some other quantification.

  10. #3040
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    Or scores of time. That is, he met with presidents multiple times. But...yeah. Rev. Graham wasnít that old.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  11. #3041
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    San Diego State provisionally suspends Pope

    USA Today

    Gosh, I figured you'd have to be at least Notre Dame to do that!
    (It was a basketball player.)

  12. #3042
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    China vows to crack down on funeral strippers.

    Which is actually just what it sounds like.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #3043
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    China vows to crack down on funeral strippers.

    Which is actually just what it sounds like.


    And I won't get to enjoy it at my own funeral.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  14. #3044
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    USA Today online headline:

    Hail Mary buzzer-beater wins HS team state title

    I'd say there's redundancy, but at least he didn't say "game-winning last second Hail Mary buzzer-beater ..."

  15. #3045
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    The Oscars apparently got pretty low ratings last night. But this Entertainment Weekly article says:

    "Early ratings appear to indicate it was the, if not one of the, least-viewed telecasts in history."

    I think "...it was one of the, if not the, least-viewed..." is what they were going for. And what's with italicizing the "the" in "one of the"? Is that really where the emphasis goes?
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  16. #3046
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    I think "...it was one of the, if not the, least-viewed..." is what they were going for. And what's with italicizing the "the" in "one of the"? Is that really where the emphasis goes?
    Yes, thatís pretty bad writing. It sounds like the writer got confused and nobody caught it.
    As above, so below

  17. #3047
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    The cliche is supposed to go "One of the greatest, if not the greatest, blah-blah(s) of all time." That structure, however, has it's own problem: is the noun that follows supposed to be singular or plural?

  18. #3048
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    The cliche is supposed to go "One of the greatest, if not the greatest, blah-blah(s) of all time." That structure, however, has it's own problem: is the noun that follows supposed to be singular or plural?
    I would think it should be plural, since the singular ("if not the greatest") is a subordinate clause, but I can't really say that it sounds wrong either way.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  19. #3049
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    The cliche is supposed to go "One of the greatest, if not the greatest, blah-blah(s) of all time." That structure, however, has it's own problem: is the noun that follows supposed to be singular or plural?
    I don't think the structure is the problem. Speaking as somebody who often interacts with people whose native language doesn't have singular or plural construction, I would say rather that it is one of those cases where you have to choose one or the other in a meaningless way. There are many situations like that, for example.

    Asking a question. We say, "do you have any children," but "do you have a car", just because the assumption is that you would have more than one child I guess.

    Also, with group nouns it's unclear which to use, i.e. "the family is going on vacation" or "the family are going on vacation." Because you have to choose one.

    And the construction above also forces you to choose.

    And by the way, "it's own problem" should be "its own problem."

    And about the question, like Sean I would use the plural.
    As above, so below

  20. #3050
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    ...

    And by the way, "it's own problem" should be "its own problem."
    Sorry. I should have caught that.

  21. #3051
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    ... Also, with group nouns it's unclear which to use, i.e. "the family is going on vacation" or "the family are going on vacation." Because you have to choose one. ...
    My understanding is you make the choice based on whether the family is going on vacation as a group or are going on separate vacations as individuals.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They donít alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
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  22. #3052
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    My understanding is you make the choice based on whether the family is going on vacation as a group or are going on separate vacations as individuals.
    I think thatís a rule of thumb, but in real use there is a tendency in American English to use singular predominantly (I usually use singular) while in British English there is a greater tendency to use the plural. It might reflect a greater emphasis on collectiveness in Europe or might simply be a grammatical heritage.
    As above, so below

  23. #3053
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I think that’s a rule of thumb, but in real use there is a tendency in American English to use singular predominantly (I usually use singular) while in British English there is a greater tendency to use the plural. It might reflect a greater emphasis on collectiveness in Europe or might simply be a grammatical heritage.
    Wouldn't a "greater emphasis on collectiveness" lean towards using the singular verb for group nouns, rather than the opposite?
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  24. #3054
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    I would think it should be plural, since the singular ("if not the greatest") is a subordinate clause, but I can't really say that it sounds wrong either way.
    It could have been done as, "one of the least-viewed telecasts in history, if not the least-viewed."

    There's some repetition there, but at least the singular/possessive issue goes away.

  25. #3055
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    I might use "Arguably, the greatest whatever of all time." It gets the idea across while leaving room for the opinions of others.

  26. #3056
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    I might use "Arguably, the greatest whatever of all time." It gets the idea across while leaving room for the opinions of others.
    For something like "greatest," sure. But the question in this case - whether the broadcast was the least-viewed or not - isn't an arguable opinion. It's a fact, one way or the other, it just wasn't known which at the time of writing.
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  27. #3057
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    For something like "greatest," sure. But the question in this case - whether the broadcast was the least-viewed or not - isn't an arguable opinion. It's a fact, one way or the other, it just wasn't known which at the time of writing.
    (Lame excuse warning.) It could be "arguable" based upon the definition and conditions, e.g., are we talking percent or absolute numbers, day or night, weekday or weekend ...

  28. #3058
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    This was posted to the ABC World News Tonight facebook page.

    DEADLY DECISION? A driver in Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, was killed after authorities say he ignored a barricade and drove onto a live wire on the road after the Nor'Easter that ignited the vehicle.

    I don't thinks that sounds like what they meant to say.
    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

  29. #3059
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    Yes, it sounds like the Northeaster, whatever that is, ignited the vehicle.
    As above, so below

  30. #3060
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    A Nor'Easter is a kind of storm.
    _____________________________________________
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    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

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