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Thread: Use of winks

  1. #31
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    Which works better for you folks?

    Here is a communication from me that I am posting as a vaguely funny, sort of inside joke
    Here is a communication from me that I am posting as a vaguely funny, sort of inside joke (the preceding was a funny bit, an inside joke, not to be taken as a serious commentary on the matter under discussion)
    I am not asking to criticize those who do not like the use of emojis, I really do not know. If am posting some attempt at (for example) funny, punny, sort of sarcastic humor, here on CQ, how would you like me to indicate that, since I cannot so indicate with the channels available for verbal or verbal/visual communication, such as tone of voice, winks, smiles, etc.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  2. #32
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    Me, I just post it as plain text.
    Then people correct me, or get annoyed with me.
    Then I point out that it was a joke.
    Then they argue with me about whether it was a joke or not, or seek to discuss what I might have meant by it if it hadn't been a joke.

    Honestly, it's much more fun that way.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Honestly, it's much more fun that way.
    We have very different ideas of fun.

    (The lack of an emoji in this posts indicates that this comment was approximately 97% serious, and the only reason for the 3% non-serious is that I wasn't sure if Grant was being serious or funny by his comment, and if he was being funny, then my taking it seriously may have not been completely inappropriate. Please note that the numerical values presented here were very rough approximations of something that is pretty much innumerable.

    Please also note that this whole footnote is intended to be somewhat humorous, but I decided to actually explain it, rather than using an emoji within the footnote to indicate that, so as it helped to further illustrate my uncertainty about this whole issue and to try to add to the subtle, irony-filled way I am looking at this entire discussion.)
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    We have very different ideas of fun.
    Or do we?

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I am guilty of using the original smiley face literally, but times change.
    I'm just wondering what you meant by "literally" there. I'm guessing that you meant "in the literal meaning," so meaning it is there to express the fact you are smiling? Or is it just a typo for "liberally"?
    As above, so below

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I'm just wondering what you meant by "literally" there. I'm guessing that you meant "in the literal meaning," so meaning it is there to express the fact you are smiling? Or is it just a typo for "liberally"?
    Ha, typos abound, and voice to text adds stochastic variety but I meant I used the original smiley face as a smile. Now I learn all these new uses. Using a little prepared icon is not very literal, and it is not worth a thousand words. I see those emoticon things as fun for children of all ages. Not as emotional expression. Poetry is better for that. To make an analogy, I never buy greeting cards with messages already inside. Blank cards may be more work, but worth the effort in my opinion.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Ha, typos abound, and voice to text adds stochastic variety but I meant I used the original smiley face as a smile.
    I guess I asked the question because I'm not sure that a smile (either the gesture or the emoticon) has a literal meaning. I think a smile after someone praises you for something is different from a smile when you smile at your little brother when he gets in trouble for something you warned him about not doing...
    As above, so below

  8. #38
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    I worked with a lady who often winked at me. I assumed (wrongly) she was flirting with me, until one day I saw her wink at other people. Turned out it was just a nervous response for her to indicate that she liked a person and wanted to become friends.

    It's tough enough on some occasions to accurately interpret people face to face, so to interpret written messages especially across global cultures can be very ambiguous. Emoji cons just add more ambiguity to the situation. This said, I still use them, my stance is that I know what it meant, and if the use of the emoticons offended, then without explanation there's not much I can do about it.

    I far as I'm concerned I take an emoticon wink as - non serious friendly gesture, in context with the message that precedes it. But then I assume that generally, people's intentions are mostly sincere, maybe that's my failing.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I guess I asked the question because I'm not sure that a smile (either the gesture or the emoticon) has a literal meaning. I think a smile after someone praises you for something is different from a smile when you smile at your little brother when he gets in trouble for something you warned him about not doing...
    I learned early that a smile, being polite and apologising can get you out of scrapes, but not all at once! An apology must come across as genuine and not confused by a smile or even a joke. I believe the Duchess of Westminster had a dictum, “ never apologise!” But it was explained that if you feel you did something wrong, you must put it right, rather than slipping away with an apology.

    In one to one actual encounters, a smile can mean a thousand things. It is really useful in a gamut of situations, but some people have difficulty interpreting smiles if they find emotions confusing. I know people who need carefully constructed sentences avoiding subtle inuendos. For them a smile is approval with no other meaning. So the various smile emoticons could be very confusing.

    There is a painting of a young woman smiling, showing teeth! At the time, it caused a scandal, promiscuous! Mores change and one must keep up .
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  10. #40
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    John Singer Sargent 1890 study, the finished painting dropped the smile.
    .Click image for larger version. 

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    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    John Singer Sargent 1890 study, the finished painting dropped the smile.
    .Click image for larger version. 

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    Its interesting that in general portraits are made with the subject showing no emotion, without smile or open mouthed. Yet often photos are taken where the subject is asked to "say cheese" which results in a smile showing teeth. The smile in the photo scenario, intending to capture a joyful moment. Portraits, to me, tend to capture the person as unemotional which could be construed as being cold and/or even sad or despaired.

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