Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 69

Thread: How did we do it before the internet...

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,481
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    Yes. Whether the odds of that going wrong have shifted or not, the stakes when things do go wrong seem to be perceived as much higher now than before. The idea is that these days a rejection or argument or breakup or such can too easily mean not merely being temporarily frustrated or irritated or embarrassed but facing an explosion of hatred & hostility, which not only is a lot more emotionally & socially harmful but can even lead to deliberate damage to one party's whole quality of life by the other party (particularly when the former is male and the latter is female)... especially at work or at a college/university, which happen to be the two main settings where adults meet other adults in-person. Even trying it is described as dangerous.
    That is truly sad, will the internet thereby solve the human population growth issue? That really generates a nostalgia about what we did before the internet.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Also, we wrote letters.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    That is truly sad, will the internet thereby solve the human population growth issue? That really generates a nostalgia about what we did before the internet.
    It may also be a problem WRT the selection process; the same algorithms that match like to like and produce social media bubbles and tailored advertising, would make it difficult to find a date outside your social tribe. No more "opposites attract" or "variety is the spice of life".
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,154
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    Yes. Whether the odds of that going wrong have shifted or not, the stakes when things do go wrong seem to be perceived as much higher now than before. The idea is that these days a rejection or argument or breakup or such can too easily mean not merely being temporarily frustrated or irritated or embarrassed but facing an explosion of hatred & hostility, which not only is a lot more emotionally & socially harmful but can even lead to deliberate damage to one party's whole quality of life by the other party (particularly when the former is male and the latter is female)... especially at work or at a college/university, which happen to be the two main settings where adults meet other adults in-person. Even trying it is described as dangerous.
    Well, that perception seems not to have reached the UK. The idea that you can get into more trouble dating a stranger off the internet than someone you've had the opportunity to observe in general social settings seems counterintuitive to me. Do we have epidemiology to back that up?

    Then again, the whole idea of wanting to meet people specifically in order to seek a long-term relationship is impenetrable to me.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Jan-19 at 12:04 PM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,481
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    It may also be a problem WRT the selection process; the same algorithms that match like to like and produce social media bubbles and tailored advertising, would make it difficult to find a date outside your social tribe. No more "opposites attract" or "variety is the spice of life".
    Sounds like a market opportunity! “All-go-rithms” “bubble bursting app”
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Then again, the whole idea of wanting to meet people specifically in order to seek a long-term relationship is impenetrable to me.
    Same here. If I'm getting into a solid relationship, it's not going to be by meeting a brand-new stranger, it's probably going to be someone I've gotten comfortable with and know about.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Sounds like a market opportunity! “All-go-rithms” “bubble bursting app”
    I'd buy that for a dollar.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,951
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Same here. If I'm getting into a solid relationship, it's not going to be by meeting a brand-new stranger, it's probably going to be someone I've gotten comfortable with and know about.
    I'll put one line here that explains why people resort to meeting a brand-new stranger for getting into a solid relationship. "I don't want to risk our friendship by turning it into a relationship".
    But I guess that's for another thread.

    @Trebuchet recently I told the story here about finding a Space encyclopedia in a thrift shop but not buying it because I have no use for it. You didn't understand (well...). See, that's why you have a storage problem with physical copies and I don't. I have about 100 CD's and 400 records and they fit nicely into 1 cupboard. Same with books, I don't have a lot of them. Software ditto.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I'll put one line here that explains why people resort to meeting a brand-new stranger for getting into a solid relationship. "I don't want to risk our friendship by turning it into a relationship".
    I would no more have a romantic relationship without the foundation of friendship than I would build a house on sand. If a close friendship isn't strong enough to weather a possible breakup, then how's it going to last in a long term romance?

    I don't have any internet relationships close enough for that. I need to interact with someone in person for a while before I can really open up to them.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,951
    I didn't say I found it a good argument. My experience with internet versus real-life regarding people: the internet can be a great place to meet new people but unsuitable to get to know those people. Real life can be difficult to meet new people (as you tend to move in the same circles a lot) but perfect to get to know them.

    So how did I meet new people before internet? Not a lot, actually. My activities did not bring me a lot into new social circles.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    So how did I meet new people before internet? Not a lot, actually. My activities did not bring me a lot into new social circles.
    Same here. Added to that my social anxiety regarding strangers, and it's meant not many opportunities. I mostly meet new friends through old friends, a limiting premise for sure.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,786
    Met my first wife about 1974 preinternet at college, through Honors Program office. I hung around there a lot.

    Met second wife by answering personal ad in a dating magazine, about 1981 preinternet. My wife-to-be was the magazine's publisher.

    Met third wife through internet about 2010, as we both wrote online fanfiction at the same website.

    Result: I can get married doing just about anything.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2021-Jan-21 at 04:24 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    I can get married doing just about anything.
    Be selective at the grocery store, then.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,786
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Be selective at the grocery store, then.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,786
    Got my last three jobs dating back to 2005 through the internet. Got my last job before that by calling the company and asking if I could join. Got my last job before that by seeing an Army enlistment officer.

    RESULT: I'd better use the internet these days.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  16. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,534
    My coworker and his wife thought I needed to find someone so they set me up on a blind date with her childhood friend. Been with her 43 years now!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  17. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My coworker and his wife thought I needed to find someone so they set me up on a blind date with her childhood friend. Been with her 43 years now!
    The coworker's wife, or the friend?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  18. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,534
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    The coworker's wife, or the friend?
    Hah! Unfortunately, the coworker's wife died about 10 years ago. Which doesn't exactly answer the question, you figure it out!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,309
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My coworker and his wife thought I needed to find someone so they set me up on a blind date with her childhood friend. Been with her 43 years now!
    Somewhat off topic for this thread (but it is OTB)... back when I was single, I had some weird/funny experiences with blind dates (or rather lacks of experience). I had several different friends who would tell me they wanted to set me up on a blind date ("OH! I know the perfect woman for you"). My response was always "sure, why not" (it was just one date). And in all cases, that would be the end of it; I'd never hear anything ever again about this perfect woman. To this day I don't know why. Did the woman say "no"? I always thought that once I said "yes" and didn't fight the proposal, that it took the challenge away of convincing me this was a good idea, and so it took the fun away for my matchmaking friend.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  20. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,154
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I had several different friends who would tell me they wanted to set me up on a blind date ...
    In my social circle, the concepts "friend" and "wanted to set me up on a blind date" are mutually exclusive.

    Grant Hutchison

  21. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,669
    Much of my military career was pre-Internet...or World Wide Web, that is. Some units/functions had networked systems but not in a sophisticated sense. For instance, we had a line item ordering system for aircraft parts but no online catalog. For that, we had illustrated parts breakdowns in among our printed-and-bound technical manuals and for further research and cross reference, we maintained a voluminous Microfiche catalog. Both received regular updates via post.

    When our units returned from deployment to excercises or 'real-world' operations, we went to the base finance office as a group, stood at counters, and filled out vouchers for travel expenses and allowances. I still remember getting hand cramps from holding the Skillcraft U.S. Government ballpoint pen in a death grip, trying to get a good transfer through to the 5th carbon copy. Nowadays, in my civilian department, we have an integrated web-based authorization/vouchering system. (Miitary branches use similar systems.) One can use it to request authorization to travel; book a flight, room, and car; and file a voucher upon one's return. The system includes a database of per diem locations and rates and provides warnings for expenses that may be out-of-policy.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  22. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,786
    I was in the U.S. Army from 1976-1981, all no internet, and manila folders full of paper were the ultimate data storage tool.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  23. #53
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,154
    Pre-internet hospital patients' notes used to get bulky really quickly. Laboratory results would arrive in envelopes at the end of office hours, printed on roughly A6 coloured paper, one sheet for each patient and for each panel of tests.
    The patient's notes contained colour-coded A4 cards with embossed self-adhesive strips. My job as a junior doc involved opening all the envelopes, reading the results, writing any necessary actions in the notes, then peeling off the covers on the self-adhesive strips and sticking the reports in place, so that they formed a sort of Venetian blind that we could riffle through to track changes in the patient's haematology, bacteriology, biochemistry, etc.
    When we admitted patients to the ICU, we'd make up a whole new notes folder just for the laboratory results. I remember a woman who'd been in ICU for 99 days departing in two wheelchairs--one for her, and one for her seven bulging notes folders.

    Grant Hutchison

  24. #54
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Storing electrons is certainly more convenient than paper. But pity the poor Sumerians and their clay slabs! Office workers had to also be weightlifters.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  25. #55
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,534
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Somewhat off topic for this thread (but it is OTB)... back when I was single, I had some weird/funny experiences with blind dates (or rather lacks of experience). I had several different friends who would tell me they wanted to set me up on a blind date ("OH! I know the perfect woman for you"). My response was always "sure, why not" (it was just one date). And in all cases, that would be the end of it; I'd never hear anything ever again about this perfect woman. To this day I don't know why. Did the woman say "no"? I always thought that once I said "yes" and didn't fight the proposal, that it took the challenge away of convincing me this was a good idea, and so it took the fun away for my matchmaking friend.
    My wife was actually the second blind date they set me up with. The first one fell asleep during the date at someone's birthday party.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,549
    When I started in Customs in 1972 every import clearance document was lodged with multiple copies plus copious documentation - Invoices, Bills of Lading etc. It was something like our office copy, the Customs Brokers office copy, the importers copy, the warehouse or wharf operators copy, the transport companies copy, the Statistics Bureau's copy plus a few more for good measure. All the documents produced were examined and then 'stamped' and returned. By about 2007 there was not a paper copy to be seen and the supporting documents were not lodged unless specifically requested and then that was done electronically. The reporting and clearance of imported (and exported) goods could only be done electronically with no option to lodge paper copies of the "Customs Entry".

    For my yearly Income Tax Return I simply log onto the website of the Australian Government Portal, which you can link to the various Govt. Depts. sites, select the Tax Office link and then prepare and lodge the return on-line. Probably three quarters of the data is pre-filled by various financial organisations I deal with. Income from my alary, retirement funds, share dividends, Bank interest, Health Fund payments etc are mostly already listed. It usually only takes less than 10 minutes to create and lodge the return.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2021-Jan-23 at 03:47 AM.

  27. #57
    We actually got stuff done.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  28. #58
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Yes, there's plenty of downside too. Distraction and information overload. Social media bubbles and echo chambers. Dark Web crime and abuse. Hacking accounts and industrial scale identity theft.

    The best and worst part of the WWW is, it turns everyone into a world-scale publisher with no editor, spreading whatever truth or lies they want to. Sturgeon's Law made manifest.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  29. #59
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,481
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Storing electrons is certainly more convenient than paper. But pity the poor Sumerians and their clay slabs! Office workers had to also be weightlifters.
    But their tablets lasted thousands of years and survived being lost and buried. We had lithography using polished etched stones, those might also last millenia but we lost the knack in favour of photography.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  30. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    But their tablets lasted thousands of years and survived being lost and buried.
    Yeah, but by then their content was somewhat out of date. The Y2K-BC bug.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •