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Thread: Movie of a supernova

  1. #1
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    Movie of a supernova

    Anyone ever make a movie of what a supernova would look like? I'm thinking that, even if it is spherically symmetric (a big iff right there), it would seem to light up in the center of the disk first, because of the finite speed of light and the size of a supergiant?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  2. #2
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    You might want to specify what time period you are talking about, and from how far away you are looking.
    There are plenty of videos showing the flow of matter and energy inside a star during the supernova. There are videos of 1987A made up of a series of still shots as it got older.
    Are you thinking about what it would look like from the surface of a planet orbiting the star?
    Forming opinions as we speak

  3. #3
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    Mar 2004
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    Not what you're looking for, but I had some fun for one of our video public nights this year making this 2-year animation from images of the Type II-P (plateau) SN2017eaw in NGC 6946. Images in the R band from the Jacobus Kapteyn telescope at La Palma; from an extensive data set we used for a light curve, but used only data from one telescope (with the best image quality) for the best visual impression. 9.4 MByte animated GIF: https://www.dropbox.com/s/931k4l8naa...6SN-2.gif?dl=0

  4. #4
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    Yes, from a planet in the system, taking into account any jests or other assymetries as well as the light delay effect I mentioned.
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  5. #5
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    Space.com has a “sound” of a supernova on the site..

  6. #6
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    For example, Betelgeuse is estimated at 4 AU radius, which makes about 30 minutes light travel time. Does it mean that when Betelgeuse explodes as a supernova, for half an hour we should be observing both the supernova, in the centre of the disc, and undisturbed presupernova at limbs?

    What does the lightcurve and spectrum of first 30 minutes of a supernova look like?

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