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Thread: Astronomers think they’ve found an exoplanet in a galaxy 23 million light-years away

  1. #1
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    Astronomers think they’ve found an exoplanet in a galaxy 23 million light-years away

    Using a variety of techniques astronomers have successfully identified thousands of exoplanets, which are planets orbiting stars outside of our own solar system. But a new research paper introduces a breakthrough: the first detection of an exoplanet not just in another solar system, but in an entirely different galaxy sitting millions of light years away. …
    Continue reading "Astronomers think they’ve found an exoplanet in a galaxy 23 million light-years away"
    The post Astronomers think they’ve found an exoplanet in a galaxy 23 million light-years away appeared first on Universe Today.


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  2. #2
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    Far Out !


  3. #3
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    The original paper on the Whirlpool galaxy's possible planet.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2009.08987

    M51-ULS-1b: The First Candidate for a Planet in an External Galaxy

    R. Di Stefano, Julia Berndtsson, Ryan Urquhart, Roberto Soria, Vinay L. Kashyap, Theron W. Carmichael, Nia Imara

    Do external galaxies host planetary systems? Many lines of reasoning suggest that the answer must be 'yes'. In the foreseeable future, however, the question cannot be answered by the methods most successful in our own Galaxy. We report on a different approach which focuses on bright X-ray sources (XRSs). M51-ULS-1b is the first planet candidate to be found because it produces a full, short-lived eclipse of a bright XRS. M51-ULS-1b has a most probable radius slightly smaller than Saturn. It orbits one of the brightest XRSs in the external galaxy M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, located 8.6 Megaparsecs from Earth. It is the first candidate for a planet in an external galaxy. The binary it orbits, M51-ULS-1, is young and massive. One of the binary components is a stellar remnant, either a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH), and the other is a massive star. X-ray transits can now be used to discover more planets in external galaxies and also planets orbiting XRSs inside the Milky Way.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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