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Thread: Broken Cable Damages Arecibo

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjameshuff View Post
    If any part's ever been a good parabola, it's been by accident...it's a spherical dish.
    Oops
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Oops
    Well spherical is good for my proposal to use a drone, the spherical aberation stays about the same for different focus lateral points.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  3. #63
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    An intriguing proposal to rebuild the Arecibo radio telescope even better than before.

    The Future Of The Arecibo Observatory: The Next Generation Arecibo Telescope.

    D. Anish Roshi, N. Aponte, E. Araya, H. Arce, L. A. Baker, W. Baan, T. M. Becker, J. K. Breakall, R. G. Brown, C. G. M. Brum, M. Busch, D. B. Campbell, T. Cohen, F. Cordova, J. S. Deneva, M. Devogele, T. Dolch, F. O. Fernandez-Rodriguez, T. Ghosh, P. F. Goldsmith, L. Gurvits, M. Haynes, C. Heiles, D. Hickson, B. Isham, R. B. Kerr, J. Kelly, J. J. Kiriazes, S. Kumar, J. Lautenbach, M. Lebron, N. Lewandowska, L. Magnani, P. K. Manoharan, S. E. Marshall, A. K. McGilvray, A. Mendez, R. Minchin, V. Negron, M. C. Nolan, L. Olmi, F. Paganelli, N. T. Palliyaguru, C. A. Pantoja, Z. Paragi, S. C. Parshley, J. E. G. Peek, B. B. P. Perera, P. Perillat, N. Pinilla-Alonso, L. Quintero, H. Radovan, S. Raizada, T. Robishaw, M. Route, C. J. Salter, A. Santoni, P. Santos, S. Sau, D. Selvaraj, A. J. Smith, M. Sulzer, S. Vaddi, F. Vargas, F. C. F. Venditti, A. Venkataraman, A. K. Virkki, A. Vishwas, S. Weinreb, D. Werthimer, A. Wolszczan, L. F. Zambrano-Marin

    The Arecibo Observatory (AO) is a multidisciplinary research and education facility that is recognized worldwide as a leading facility in astronomy, planetary, and atmospheric and space sciences. AO's cornerstone research instrument was the 305-m William E. Gordon telescope. On December 1, 2020, the 305-m telescope collapsed and was irreparably damaged. In the three weeks following the collapse, AO's scientific and engineering staff and the AO users community initiated extensive discussions on the future of the observatory. The community is in overwhelming agreement that there is a need to build an enhanced, next-generation radar-radio telescope at the AO site. From these discussions, we established the set of science requirements the new facility should enable. These requirements can be summarized briefly as: 5 MW of continuous wave transmitter power at 2 - 6 GHz, 10 MW of peak transmitter power at 430 MHz (also at 220MHz under consideration), zenith angle coverage 0 to 48 deg, frequency coverage 0.2 to 30 GHz and increased FoV. These requirements determine the unique specifications of the proposed new instrument. The telescope design concept we suggest consists of a compact array of fixed dishes on a tiltable, plate-like structure with a collecting area equivalent to a 300m dish. This concept, referred to as the Next Generation Arecibo Telescope (NGAT), meets all of the desired specifications and provides significant new science capabilities to all three research groups at AO. This whitepaper presents a sample of the wide variety of the science that can be achieved with the NGAT, the details of the telescope design concept and the need for the new telescope to be located at the AO site. We also discuss other AO science activities that interlock with the NGAT in the white paper.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2103.01367
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #64
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    The many small dishes approach probably makes good sense for economic and maintenance reasons. Without thinking about budget or other practical issues, I can imagine rebuilding it with a deformable dish that can change to maintain a parabolic section keeping the same spot in the sky in focus for an hour or so. This would be MUCH more complex for the dish, but the transmitter/receiver would be greatly simplified, and the towers and cable would need to be about 1% as strong as the old ones were. Making the cables out of something that doesn't corrode so quickly would be expensive, but would be another plus.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    The many small dishes approach probably makes good sense for economic and maintenance reasons. Without thinking about budget or other practical issues, I can imagine rebuilding it with a deformable dish that can change to maintain a parabolic section keeping the same spot in the sky in focus for an hour or so. This would be MUCH more complex for the dish, but the transmitter/receiver would be greatly simplified, and the towers and cable would need to be about 1% as strong as the old ones were. Making the cables out of something that doesn't corrode so quickly would be expensive, but would be another plus.
    What they propose sounds like the equivalent of building a giant pointable dish, and then covering it with smaller dishes. I'm not sure how that's better for cost or maintenance. A compact array doesn't have the resolution advantage of phased arrays, while having all the disadvantages, such as greatly multiplying some of the pricier bits of hardware required.

    Maybe they'd be able to get more funding due to ability to track more flexibly and do simultaneous observations of different parts of the sky?

  6. #66
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    A report by the National Science Foundation estimates it will cost up to $50 million to clean up the damage from the collapsed Arecibo radio telescope, but that it is still too soon to determine whether or how to rebuild the famous observatory.

    https://spacenews.com/nsf-report-est...to-50-million/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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