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Thread: Supercomputer rankings

  1. #1
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    Supercomputer rankings

    I'm not really meaning this as self promotion, but just to let people know what I do. Our new supercomputer has taken the top rankings on all the major supercomputer scores. I wrote the English press releases, so any complaints can go my way.

    https://www.riken.jp/en/news_pubs/ne...3_1/index.html
    As above, so below

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    Well that's cool...

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    Can it run Crysis?

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    Please tell me you wrote the press release on it!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Please tell me you wrote the press release on it!
    He did tell you (us)!:
    Quote Originally Posted by Jens
    I wrote the English press releases, so any complaints can go my way.
    CJSF
    "Off went his rocket at the speed of light
    Flying so fast there was no day or night
    Messing around with the fabric of time
    He knows who's guilty 'fore there's even a crime

    Davy, Davy Crockett
    The buckskin astronaut
    Davy, Davy Crockett
    There's more than we were taught"

    -They Might Be Giants, "The Ballad Of Davy Crockett (In Outer Space)"


    lonelybirder.org

  6. #6
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    This was reported in my morning paper!
    (They didn't print the press release, sorry.)
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    This was reported in my morning paper!
    (They didn't print the press release, sorry.)
    Thanks for letting me know. That's normal, I don't think any newspaper would normally print a press release without modifying it. In fact, once I asked a journalist at a conference about using puns and other cute things in press releases, and his answer was, "it's good, but don't make it too good, because my editor won't allow me to use the same headline used in the press release."

    Just out of curiosity, did you notice where it was from? Reuters or AFP?
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Thanks for letting me know. That's normal, I don't think any newspaper would normally print a press release without modifying it. In fact, once I asked a journalist at a conference about using puns and other cute things in press releases, and his answer was, "it's good, but don't make it too good, because my editor won't allow me to use the same headline used in the press release."

    Just out of curiosity, did you notice where it was from? Reuters or AFP?
    Wasn't attributed sorry. Page 21 in the "World" section. Under CQ rules I'd better not say what its neighboring news items were!

    Edit: scanning the paper I found two items with "The Times" at the end, and four with "AP", none with "Reuters". Previous day "Telegraph Group" x 2, one "Washington Post" and a couple more "The Times".
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    Last edited by pzkpfw; 2020-Jun-25 at 06:30 AM.
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    I'd hate to play Pong on this thing's fastest setting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I'm not really meaning this as self promotion, but just to let people know what I do. Our new supercomputer has taken the top rankings on all the major supercomputer scores. I wrote the English press releases, so any complaints can go my way.

    https://www.riken.jp/en/news_pubs/ne...3_1/index.html
    How many towers are at the facility?

  11. #11
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    Amazing that this thing is a million times faster than super computers from 25 years ago.
    The moment an instant lasted forever, we were destined for the leading edge of eternity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    How many towers are at the facility?
    What do you mean by towers? Pillars? Racks?


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    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    I'd hate to play Pong on this thing's fastest setting.
    Agree. I definitely would not want to try that.


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    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    What do you mean by towers? Pillars? Racks?


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    OK then how many computers in that room.

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    Supercomputer rankings

    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    OK then how many computers in that room.
    Well, itís one computer, but with a massively parallel architecture as with other supercomputers. It has about 400 racks and a total of about 150,000 cores.
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Well, it’s one computer, but with a massively parallel architecture as with other supercomputers. It has about 400 racks and a total of about 150,000 cores.
    And just for comparison, a typical personal computer would have maybe 2 to 8 cores. I checked mine, and it has 4.
    As above, so below

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    And just for comparison, a typical personal computer would have maybe 2 to 8 cores. I checked mine, and it has 4.
    It gets trickier than that when you consider GPU cores and not just CPU cores. For instance hereís a list of CUDA core count by Nvidia card:

    https://gist.github.com/cavinsmith/e...9eaa8775e3284e

    The high end GTX Titan Z has 5760 cores. However, it is important to consider that GPU cores are more specialized and limited than CPU cores. On the other hand, CPU/GPU combos are used in supercomputer architectures and GPUs are often used for compute heavy tasks on PCs. For that matter, a properly set up present day PC would count as a supercomputer if you could send it back in a time machine to a couple decades or so back.

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    Let’s not grow viruses in that server farm.
    Only free range Crays for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    .. and GPUs are often used for compute heavy tasks on PCs. ...
    I remember being surprised (though it was obvious in hindsight) when bitcoin mining was a significant factor in the supply and cost of video cards.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    I remember being surprised (though it was obvious in hindsight) when bitcoin mining was a significant factor in the supply and cost of video cards.
    I remember that well. Nvidia stock price went way up (along with tight card supply) and then later dropped dramatically when bitcoin and some other “mining” became less profitable. It’s come back since though. (I own a few shares so have an interest. The ups and downs aren’t for the faint of heart.)

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  21. #21
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    I love that we are now almost half way to Exascale...
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  22. #22
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    The US Frontier computer which is supposed to be ready in 2021 is projected to be capable of 1.5 exaflops:

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/7/18...nal-laboratory

    There’s also the Aurora supercomputer:

    https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science...ory-ncna985121

    And pretty much all the other big players including Japan are working on their own exascale computers. I do wonder sometimes how much practical use they get out of them vs. how much they are just for bragging rights. After all, they are basically just a massive number of the same (or at least very similar) cores that are found in PCs or smartphones bound tightly together with fairly rapid communication. Does it really help that much to group them that tightly instead of using more distributed computing?

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  23. #23
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    If we went up a millionfold in the last 25 years will we, in 2045, be in zettascale going on yottascale?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    If we went up a millionfold in the last 25 years will we, in 2045, be in zettascale going on yottascale?
    Probably not. Itís not that simple. There are actual physical limitations on advances.
    As above, so below

  25. #25
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    So my next phone probably won't have a Fugaku in it?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    So my next phone probably won't have a Fugaku in it?
    It probably wonít have the CPU thatís used for Fugaku because itís a bit pricey. Each CPU has 48 cores, and a system with two CPUs will apparently cost about 40,000 US dollars.


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    As above, so below

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    Where (roughly) would a human brain rank?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Where (roughly) would a human brain rank?
    Apples and oranges. Electronic computers started out as glorified calculators, the human brain does things very differently. As computers, humans were left in the dust by early electronic computers, which is why that profession died out in the 1950s. On the other hand the human brain can do things we haven’t managed to mechanize yet, and it isn’t clear how much of that is due to complexity and how much is just because we don’t understand the processes well enough yet. In any case, the architecture of a brain emulator would almost certainly be very different from a present day computer.
    Last edited by Van Rijn; 2020-Jul-25 at 03:31 PM.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  29. #29
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    Adding to what Van Rijn said, it's not an easy comparison to make. The human brain is remarkable, but in a different way from supercomputers. Supercomputers use electricity on the scale of 10s of megawatts. By contrast, the human brain only uses about 10 watts. Actually, some people have tried to estimate how powerful the human brain is in FLOPS, and it seems to be most powerful than any supercomputers, i.e. on the order of 10^18 FLOPS at least compared to about 10^15 for a supercomputer. However, you can't measure it (so it is just an estimate). Supercomputers are judged by running a program called LINPACK, which essentially makes them do a rapid sequence of arithmetic operations. And humans simply cannot do that, so if one of us tried to do LINPACT it would take us centuries or maybe millennia.

    https://aiimpacts.org/brain-performance-in-flops/
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    [...] Supercomputers use electricity on the scale of 10s of megawatts. By contrast, the human brain only uses about 10 watts. Actually, some people have tried to estimate how powerful the human brain is in FLOPS, and it seems to be most powerful than any supercomputers, i.e. on the order of 10^18 FLOPS at least compared to about 10^15 for a supercomputer. [...]

    https://aiimpacts.org/brain-performance-in-flops/
    I recommend reading the comment to that post. I didnít write it, but I can imagine writing something very similar to it. Essentially these are estimates of what it could take to emulate the function of a human brain with a conventional architecture digital computer (and incidentally notice the estimates are all over the map). It doesnít mean that a human brain performs the same functions as a conventional digital computer. Iím not aware of any evidence that the brain does floating point operations at all. We can calculate after learning how, but only by using much of the brainís resources in an inefficient way and very slowly compared to a typical electronic computer. Emulation can be extremely inefficient compared to purpose built hardware and that goes for biology as well as electronics: A human can perform the functions of a CPU, but very slowly and likely with more errors.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

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