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Thread: The COVID-19 Discussion Thread (OTB)

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    I went out to the shops in our little town this morning and mask wearing has got to about 100%.
    Pretty much no-one wearing masks in these parts, except the usual suspects--that is, the small group of Asian students still living on the university campus, who've been wearing masks for years. They're wearing some pretty striking masks these days--I saw what looked like zombie teeth last time I met one of them.

    Grant Hutchison

  2. #62
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    Checker at the food co-op the other day had the classic Guy Fawkes mask image drawn on his.
    I've worn leather gloves at the store a couple of times but given it up, though I do wear an N95 mask. It's the kind with an exhaust valve so not doing much good protecting people from me. I've made myself adhere to an absolute rule that if I touch it, I buy it. Which is fine, except I don't know who else touched it first.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #63
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    We went grocery shopping for the first time in just over two weeks. Still, there is no toilet paper in the store. It’s been many weeks since the store has had any available. What the heck are people doing with it? The supply is allegedly still flowing. Are people’s homes filled with the stuff?


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  4. #64
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    The COVID-19 Discussion Thread (OTB)

    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    We went grocery shopping for the first time in just over two weeks. Still, there is no toilet paper in the store. It’s been many weeks since the store has had any available. What the heck are people doing with it? The supply is allegedly still flowing. Are people’s homes filled with the stuff?


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    Part of the problem in many grocery stores is that TP is bulky on the shelf and even a few pallets are consumed quickly by early-worm shoppers;there’s just no place to store a lot of pallets.

    But Costco and Sams, not so much. But even they can run out. I also understand that the paper mills were already running 24 x 7 before the crisis so this weird buying binge isn’t something easily corrected without limiting supplies. And which many stores are doing.

  5. #65
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    We never had many shortages around here, and what there were (toilet paper, porridge, pasta) have now got back to normal.
    I think everyone in the UK had already stock-piled twice over for Brexit, so didn't have room for much panic buying.

    Grant Hutchison

  6. #66
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    There was panic buying of bricks, tiles and suchlike to keep building projects going and now I see such things stockpiled the other side of the sea. Various electrical components disappeared from stockists too. Those are just items I needed so I noticed. The daily consumables soon came back on supermarket shelves and round here the smaller shops with slightly higher prices, never ran out.
    Masks disappeared, also builders masks. It was much worse when oil delivery trucks drivers went on strike, what, 18 years ago, the shelves were empty in a week. But we are not in a big city. City dynamics are different.
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  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    We went grocery shopping for the first time in just over two weeks. Still, there is no toilet paper in the store. It’s been many weeks since the store has had any available. What the heck are people doing with it? The supply is allegedly still flowing. Are people’s homes filled with the stuff?
    One argument I have heard is that about 40% of toilet paper is used at work, which is sold through different distribution and packaging looks different. Residential toilet paper production was at capacity so production couldn’t keep up when more people have been staying at home. Add to that, when people do find toilet paper these days, if they are allowed, they will likely buy at least some extra. Similar issue with some grocery items- more people eating at home, not eating out putting a strain on food production intended for home use. Less an issue for produce or meat that can go to homes or restaurants, more an issue for packaged foods.

    I managed to buy some TP through Amazon. First I got some that I read, after ordering, is made with recycled paper (no, not that kind!) and doesn’t have the best reviews because it tends to fall apart easily and is a bit rough. Then, after checking Amazon many times I finally managed to find some regular TP on sale that was still available. 18 rolls of that in one package. I plan to use the regular paper and keep the recycled paper as backup. Hopefully when the regular stuff gets low more people will have gone back to work and things will be getting closer to normal.

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  8. #68
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    I saw some 12-packs of toilet paper at the 99˘ Store about two weeks ago. I live alone and didn't want that much so I didn't buy one. It was encouraging just to see it again. I haven't seen any anywhere since. But I'm still going to work and was invited to borrow some there if I ran out. But that won't work if I get symptoms and stay home. I should borrow some before I run out.

  9. #69
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    One thing coming out of this is that I am going to look a lot more like a prepper, although I don’t expect to ever go into it deeply. My initial plan was to have enough food and other stuff to last a couple weeks or so in case I needed to self isolate. Now witnessing the panic buying and supply shortages, I plan on, when possible, always to have a good supply of things that last a long time, but would inconvenience me if I couldn’t buy them at the store.

    So for instance, extra shelf stable food, TP, paper towels, acetaminophen, soap, isopropyl alcohol, batteries, and various other items when I think of them. I will probably lay in a few masks too at some point when demand drops, even though I am not very enthusiastic about them in regards to Covid-19.

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  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    One argument I have heard is that about 40% of toilet paper is used at work, which is sold through different distribution and packaging looks different. Residential toilet paper production was at capacity so production couldn’t keep up when more people have been staying at home. Add to that, when people do find toilet paper these days, if they are allowed, they will likely buy at least some extra. Similar issue with some grocery items- more people eating at home, not eating out putting a strain on food production intended for home use. Less an issue for produce or meat that can go to homes or restaurants, more an issue for packaged foods.

    I managed to buy some TP through Amazon. First I got some that I read, after ordering, is made with recycled paper (no, not that kind!) and doesn’t have the best reviews because it tends to fall apart easily and is a bit rough. Then, after checking Amazon many times I finally managed to find some regular TP on sale that was still available. 18 rolls of that in one package. I plan to use the regular paper and keep the recycled paper as backup. Hopefully when the regular stuff gets low more people will have gone back to work and things will be getting closer to normal.
    Yeah, the difference in supply chains is a factor. TP is not just used at work, but in other public places. The public type tends to be single-ply and 1000-grit. People don't want that at home.
    There's tons of TP at my supermarkets now. But if you want Charmin Extra-Soft, with the blue bears, good luck.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    I saw some 12-packs of toilet paper at the 99˘ Store about two weeks ago. I live alone and didn't want that much so I didn't buy one. It was encouraging just to see it again. I haven't seen any anywhere since. But I'm still going to work and was invited to borrow some there if I ran out. But that won't work if I get symptoms and stay home. I should borrow some before I run out.
    Wait! I usually do my shopping on my way home from work, but the time I saw toilet paper at the 99˘ Store I was on my way to work in the morning and stopped to buy some Mountain Dew and potato chips. They probably hadn't had time to sell out by then.

  12. #72
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    Mask wearing is well below 10% here in the shops. Glove wearing is even less. The continuing Government advice is that wearing masks is of little value and their use has not been recommended. Saying "Using a mask incorrectly can actually make it more dangerous.". and "For uninfected people, wearing a surgical mask in public is unlikely to significantly reduce your risk of being infected with COVID-19. Healthy people do not need to wear surgical masks in public."

    Because of the, current, very low rate of infection in Australia some of the more stringent restrictions are now being rolled back in the various states. The national border closure to non- Australian passengers is likely to continue for at least another 5 months as are various State border closures. The most likely first opening of the national border would be with our historical partner New Zealand, which has similar low infection rates. Everyone is being very cautious about a 'second round of infections' as has happened in Japan and Singapore.

    One of the major National Supermarket chains here has just announced an end to toilet paper purchase limits.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2020-Apr-28 at 08:51 AM.

  13. #73
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    It's come out that a popular heartburn remedy my help with Covid. Oh goody, yet another thing for people to hoard.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #74
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    When I went to Simon's school the other day, most people were wearing masks, including a fair number of the kids. I need to make a few for Simon, in fact. My stimulus check should clear tomorrow, and I'll buy more ribbon/bias tape. I'm actually planning to order for curbside pick-up from the fabric store--I have a ton of fabric, but I need some notions to work on dropping the pile some.

    A friend's uncle has died. Still, to my knowledge, no one I know personally, but a lot of people at a distance. And Tom Hanks has not only survived but is apparently contributing his blood to the people working toward a vaccine.
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  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    <snip>
    First I got some that I read, after ordering, is made with recycled paper (no, not that kind!) and doesn’t have the best reviews because it tends to fall apart easily and is a bit rough.
    We've used various recycled brands for years (for environmental reasons) and I haven't noticed any difference. But maybe I'm not a connoisseur.

    Speaking of shortages, I'm wondering if meat will be the next thing. At the start of this, we noted very low stocks in stores because I think people were stocking up / hoarding it, along with the toilet paper. But that quickly stopped and supplies normalized, I assume once people filled their freezers. Now with multiple meat packing plants shutting down (employees getting sick and dying from the virus), there is again talk of shortages and I suspect again that people will hoard it.
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  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    It's come out that a popular heartburn remedy my help with Covid. Oh goody, yet another thing for people to hoard.
    At least the hoarding, on this occasion, won't run down the necessary medical supplies. The clinical trial is of the intravenous preparation, which you're not going to get in pharmacies. (Though of course some people seem willing to try injecting anything these days.)

    Grant Hutchison

  17. #77
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    Early-on, there were serious empty spots in the meat department of the local grocery. Yesterday, there weren’t too many empty spots, but prices were noticeably higher than two weeks ago.

    There’s talk of impending shortages; meanwhile chicken farms in the state may have to cull their flocks due to lack of market. The problem is in the middle of the chain. Industrial processing plants are fertile ground for pandemic spread among workers.


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  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    We've used various recycled brands for years (for environmental reasons) and I haven't noticed any difference. But maybe I'm not a connoisseur.

    Speaking of shortages, I'm wondering if meat will be the next thing. At the start of this, we noted very low stocks in stores because I think people were stocking up / hoarding it, along with the toilet paper. But that quickly stopped and supplies normalized, I assume once people filled their freezers. Now with multiple meat packing plants shutting down (employees getting sick and dying from the virus), there is again talk of shortages and I suspect again that people will hoard it.
    I refuse to play that game. I am hording meatless recipes. I love a good salad.
    Solfe

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    It's come out that a popular heartburn remedy my help with Covid. Oh goody, yet another thing for people to hoard.
    Amusingly enough, I had purchased a bottle of that particular heartburn remedy for my wife mere hours before I read about its apparent effects on Covid-19.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  20. #80
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    Well now, our local governments, in concert with the CDC (which is based here in Atlanta) are going to be selecting random households in two of our most-populated counties for serology testing. This could get interesting in all kinds of ways.

    The Georgia Department of Public Health, Fulton County and Dekalb County Boards of Health are working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to learn more about the spread of COVID-19 in the community. This investigation will help us estimate the percentage of people in the community who have been infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Some people may have had COVID-19 but were not tested, did not have any symptoms, or did not seek medical care.

    From April 28 through May 4, teams will be visiting randomly selected homes in Fulton [which includes Atlanta] and Dekalb counties to ask residents questions about their health and to collect blood samples for an antibody test. Antibodies are proteins the body makes in response to infection. The antibody test can tell us whether a person might have had a past infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. The antibody test is not meant to diagnose whether a person has COVID-19 now. All members of the households selected will be asked to participate, including children. Participation is voluntary, and you can ask investigation teams any questions you have before agreeing to participate.

  21. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    We never had many shortages around here, and what there were (toilet paper, porridge, pasta) have now got back to normal.
    I think everyone in the UK had already stock-piled twice over for Brexit, so didn't have room for much panic buying.

    Grant Hutchison
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  22. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    I've gone shopping a few times since the lockdowns began, both to our local grocery store and also Costco. The first time I went to Costco was about four weeks ago and noticed the mask-wearing to non-mask-wearing percentage was about 70%, and that included shoppers and staff. I went again two days ago and it's now around 90% with almost all staff wearing masks and gloves.
    And now Costco will be requiring customers to wear masks.

    New York (CNN Business)Costco is requiring customers to wear face masks or coverings in its stores beginning May 4.

    The company is the largest US retailer to enact the rule, which is aimed at helping prevent the spread of Covid-19. Costco said the face coverings must be worn "at all times" in the store and will not serve as a "substitute for social distancing."

    Certain exemptions are applied, including for customers under 2-years-old and people who can't wear one because of a medical condition. Costco announced the changes Wednesday on its website.

  23. #83
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    Nevermind, completely inappropriate post in the wrong thread. Visit "trivial things that bug you" for original content.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    But I don’t see anything about them supplying masks, which is annoying. The last time I was in Costco, it was just when things were starting to get serious, but before it really took off. I saw two customers wearing masks, one was asian so there was the cultural aspect there. I thought it was a bit pointless and still do. Cashiers were wearing gloves, but that was it. Otherwise, completely normal, no significant attempts at social distancing. Since then, I’ve had a delivery made to the house from them once, and plan to do it again soon. I pay extra (mostly for the tip) but I would rather minimize contact, and it is convenient.

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  25. #85
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    Some employees at Safeway today were wearing masks but no gloves, some the other way around.

    I was wearing a mask, which got really annoying when my nose started running.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #86
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    I guess about ⅓ of the people here are wearing masks. I'm not, but I've started holding my breath when I pass near people. Not the cartoon style with the noisy inhale and puffy cheeks. I just stop breathing for several seconds. I don't know if it does any good.

  27. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Everyone is being very cautious about a 'second round of infections' as has happened in Japan and Singapore.
    I'm a little less clear about Singapore, but I don't think in Japan it was really a second wave. It was more that the level was maintained at a fairly low level, and then it started to spike, and then the emergency measures were put into place, and the increase started to slow, which makes sense. There hasn't been any relaxation yet, so it's too soon to even see whether there will be a rebound. In fact, a lot of the infections seem to be clusters (I think that is true for Singapore as well, though in the case of Singapore there was talk that they had contained it, so it seems like a rebound though it seems also more, from looking at graphs, that there was no first wave really, just a small number of cases that never exploded).
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  28. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I'm a little less clear about Singapore, but I don't think in Japan it was really a second wave. It was more that the level was maintained at a fairly low level, and then it started to spike, and then the emergency measures were put into place, and the increase started to slow, which makes sense. There hasn't been any relaxation yet, so it's too soon to even see whether there will be a rebound. In fact, a lot of the infections seem to be clusters (I think that is true for Singapore as well, though in the case of Singapore there was talk that they had contained it, so it seems like a rebound though it seems also more, from looking at graphs, that there was no first wave really, just a small number of cases that never exploded).
    And elsewhere in the region, South Korea also had an explosion of cases, mostly from a couple of clusters, and then they imposed measures and the rate went down. As far as I know they still have fairly strict measures in place. So I'm essentially agreeing with the post I responded to, that it's better not to ease up too soon. I just meant to point out that in Japan there was no easing, because the restrictions were initially not in place, and then when the numbers started to jump there was a reaction.
    As above, so below

  29. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    And elsewhere in the region, South Korea also had an explosion of cases, mostly from a couple of clusters, and then they imposed measures and the rate went down. As far as I know they still have fairly strict measures in place. So I'm essentially agreeing with the post I responded to, that it's better not to ease up too soon. I just meant to point out that in Japan there was no easing, because the restrictions were initially not in place, and then when the numbers started to jump there was a reaction.
    I see that South Korea certainly seems to be getting on top of this epidemic..

    I understand where you are coming from in regard to Japan. I was seeing plenty of discussions a few weeks ago that Japan was not doing enough testing nor taking isolation measures seriously enough. The National political leadership seemed to be saying that it was under control when it was obviously not. The Governors of major cities were enforcing measures in defiance of the Prime Minister. I think you are probably right about the progress of restrictions in Japan.

    With Singapore they initially had responded very well and were being held as a example for other countries. But there was a jump when Singapore citizens returned from overseas. There is also the huge problem of the dormitories of construction 'guest workers' numbering around 284,000. They live in extremely cramped conditions with only basic facilities and now make up over 80% of Singapore 's infections. Singapore has now had more infections than Japan or South Korea with a much smaller population. Pleasingly, the number of deaths is still very low.

    Our plan seems to be to slowly wind back a few restrictions at a time, not including the National border closures, and then sit back for a few weeks to ensure there is no sudden jump in infections.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Our plan seems to be to slowly wind back a few restrictions at a time, not including the National border closures, and then sit back for a few weeks to ensure there is no sudden jump in infections.
    Yes, that seems to be about what's going on here in Japan as well. Apparently Abe is going to extend the emergency declaration (if he hasn't already), and although there is no legal lock-down a lot of restaurants and coffee shops have shut down, and events are cancelled, so it's likely that will continue (a sort of low-intensity shut-down). I think it makes sense because the disruptions are not terrible and the number of new infections is going down.
    As above, so below

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