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Thread: A question for Grant...

  1. #1
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    A question for Grant...

    or others from Scotland or the UK.
    I find I'm a bit of a sucker for a Scottish accent. David Tennant comes to mind.
    I've been watching YouTube videos by a couple of Scots, Scot Manley and BigClive.

    Can you tell where they are originally from by their accents? Neither is there now, Manley is in California and Clive on the Isle of Man.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    or others from Scotland or the UK.
    I find I'm a bit of a sucker for a Scottish accent. David Tennant comes to mind.
    I've been watching YouTube videos by a couple of Scots, Scot Manley and BigClive.

    Can you tell where they are originally from by their accents? Neither is there now, Manley is in California and Clive on the Isle of Man.
    I'm no phonologist, but Manley is west coast Lowlands, I think. BigClive sounds like Edinburgh to me, but that "telephone voice" accent is much adopted by other Scots--my mother does it unconsciously when answering the telephone, or when imitating the speech of people she considers "posh".
    We have a host of local accents in Scotland, but many Scots will migrate towards Scottish Standard English when speaking for a general audience. Often against that background I can pick up an east/west distinction in the Lowlands, and people from the Highlands and Hebrides sound so many vowels and consonants towards the front of their mouths that they're very easy to spot.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Thanks!
    According to Wikipedia, Manley is from Troon, which would appear to qualify as West Coast. Clive is originally from Glasgow as far as I can tell. I don't think I ever heard of a "telephone voice" before.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    According to Wikipedia, Manley is from Troon, which would appear to qualify as West Coast.
    Yes, that's about right. Bit like Glasgow, but not broad Glasgow.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Clive is originally from Glasgow as far as I can tell. I don't think I ever heard of a "telephone voice" before.
    "Telephone voice" is the register shift that people adopt, usually unconsciously, when addressing a stranger, especially if they can't see the stranger to pick up on social cues. It's usually a shift towards a more standard accent and vocabulary (in the case of most Scots, that would be Scottish Standard English), but it can involve some sort of social elevation, too - working-class folk adopting a more upper-middle-class accent. The result is a variable approximation to the accent you can hear in the sound clip here.
    That accent originally comes from the more privileged areas of Edinburgh (as did the speaker in the clip, at least by upbringing), and historically it has its origin in Scottish people nudging their accent a little closer to (what was) the British prestige accent, Received Pronunciation. It's the vibe I was getting from some of Clive's vowels.
    It's sometimes referred to a "Morningside accent" (prosperous middle class area of Edinburgh) or a "Kelvinside accent" (prosperous middle class area of Glasgow). The accent Maggie Smith affected in The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie is an extreme example, of a kind much lampooned by Scots. There is, in fact, a whole genre of Scottish jokes deriving from the interaction between an affected Morningside speaker and a salt-of-the-earth Scot.

    See if you can figure this one out:
    Morningside (ordering high tea in a small cafe): And I'd like to have a slice of this, please. Is it a cake or a meringue?
    Salt-of-the-Earth: No love, yir no wrang. It's a cake.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Wow. As an American, I wouldn't even have identified the guy in the clip as a Scot.
    Now I wonder what you sound like!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Wow. As an American, I wouldn't even have identified the guy in the clip as a Scot.
    Now I wonder what you sound like!
    Nothing like Sir Malcolm Rifkind. Even on the telephone.
    Always difficult to hear what your own accent is like, but from listening to a podcast I once recorded, I seem to be not a million miles from Ewan McGregor's conversational voice. McGregor was born in the same part of Scotland as me, but our backgrounds are rather different. We've probably both arrived at a kind of middle-of-the-road register of Scottish Standard English after following slightly different linguistic trajectories. Sometimes, especially when he's acting, McGregor veers towards Morningside (you can hear a little of that in the YouTube video), whereas my vowels are rather flatter.

    (For those unfamiliar with the horrors of Miss Jean Brodie's accent: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXA0...=youtu.be&t=18)

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2020-Mar-08 at 05:58 PM.

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    A question for Grant...

    I hear a bit of accent in the rs in Sir Malcolm but yes, more English than not.

    We have friends who come from Glasgow and they sound more like Big Clive than Scott Manley or Sir Malcolm. And their accents are still quite strong, even after living in the USA for 30 years or so.

    I always liked to hear people from Northumberland speak. Even though they are geographically English the accent has drifted quite a bit further north.

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    Ewan McGregor sounds more like I would expect. And the Jean Brodie trailer featured Gordon Jackson, also a Scot, but who never sounded particularly Scottish to me.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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