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Thread: Subtle Bad Science in the Movies That really irritates [Spoilers possible]

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sticks View Post
    I thought I would set up a thread after watching Frozen II and after conversations with an administrator, to ensure propriety.

    Today I went to see Frozen II at my local independent.

    Now I know it is fantasy and has magic in it, usually beyond the remit of what Phil used to do with the likes of Armageddon, however there was one line that irked, if you are in the know.

    It is where the snowman character, Olaf says that "Water has memory"

    I suspect that only those aware of the claims of Homoeopathy will have heard this one. Those proponents claim that water has a memory of substances that were in it, even when they have been diluted out of existence.

    Admittedly in the film they do not make reference to homoeopathic treatments whatsoever. However, because of the line "Water has memory" I suspect someone on the writing team must have had an acquaintance with homoeopathy and its claims, and was surreptitiously trying to promote it by bringing out this line of dialogue. I wonder how many people spending money on this "alternative" medicine also made the connection I did.

    Any one else spot any bad science in other movies, that is not as blatant as Armageddon, but is there and irritates?
    Here is a less-woo-woo interpretation of that line as a reference to ice cores and glaciers carrying the “memory” of past environmental conditions.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Television series, in particular, seem to reuse outdated medical equipment (presumably because it's cheaply available). Those of us of a certain age would convene in the coffee room and say things like "Did you see that Manley Pulmovent in Broadchurch last night? Haven't seen one of those in decades."

    Grant Hutchison
    My wife, an RN, is continually amazed how TV hospitals seem to have no one working there except interns and residents. Incidentally, in the US, you want to avoid teaching hospitals in early summer. That’s when the new crop of interns show up, the ones whose estimates of their skills is far above the actual level.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  3. #33
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    And in Superman, Christopher Reeves didn't actually fly. It was all done with wires!

    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    And in Superman, Christopher Reeves didn't actually fly. It was all done with wires!

    Did you know they wanted to use an RC plane shaped like Christopher Reeves to film the flying sequences, but couldn't do it with the tech at the time? I only know this because in the mid 2000, Mattel made one that worked. I suspect the hangup back when Superman filmed, was they wanted a soft, flapping cape. The toy uses a solid foam cape to act like a wing. It was Super fun to play with.
    Solfe

  5. #35
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    Nitpick: "Reeve", not "Reeves".
    Reeves was the other guy, from the '50's TV show.
    He probably had wires too.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Nitpick: "Reeve", not "Reeves".
    Reeves was the other guy, from the '50's TV show.
    He probably had wires too.
    By the end of his run as Superman, George Reeves had bulked up so much I suspect that they had to use cables not wires.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    He probably had wires too.
    The Adventures Of Superman used Reeves lying prone on a blue platform, with a fan blowing on him. His image was then superimposed on a sky backdrop.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  8. #38
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    Here's a case where they got it (more-or-less) right. The last episode of last season's "Better Call Saul" ended with a gunshot, filmed from a distance, and they actually had a slight delay between the flash and the sound.

    YouTube link
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  9. #39
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    A fellow named Don Glut made some amateur horror and adventure films in the 1960s.

    https://www.amazon.com/I-Was-Teenage-Moviemaker-Documentary/dp/B01IITM42Q/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=don+glut&qid=1583940255&sr=8-3

    In the DVD collection, he explains how he recreated a flying superman. He pasted a cutout flying figure on the inside of a a car window, then filmed the window while someone else (or so I hope!) drove the car around town, thus changing the background. Of course, this would later be spliced after a shot of an actor in costume running and jumping. Really, it isn't much worse than some expensive professional effects from the 1950s.

    His documentary shows many other clever tricks involving cardboard, glue, foodstuffs. etc.

  10. #40
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    He wrote a lot for children's television (animation)

  11. #41
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    Yeah. Glut is a self-trained (and respected) paleontologist, based upon his love of movie dinosaurs. (I've corresponded with him a bit about growing up in Chicago and watching Shock Theater in the late 1950s.)

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