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Thread: How long until we colonize the moon (continued)

  1. #181
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
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    8,947
    "Moon Registry: Cataloging the Past…and Future of Lunar Exploration"

    https://www.leonarddavid.com/moon-re...r-exploration/

    An interactive registry that catalogs human historical sites and artifacts on the Moon has been unveiled.

    The For All Moonkind Moon Registry is a free online resource that provides overviews of every mission involving lunar exploration, including details on the objects related to those endeavors that are still on the lunar surface – from commemorative medallions and flags to rovers and scientific experiments.

    As a registry, the online tool is not only an educational and awareness-raising tool, it can support a wide variety of services for historians, engineers, archaeologists and future lunar enterprises.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  2. #182
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Depew, NY
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    I often wonder about the value of naturally occuring salt on the moon. Water is heavy to transport, but easier than He-3. If you could get enough water to the surface of the moon in a region that had both salt and a natural cave, lava tube or pit crater, you'd have yourself the makings of a radiator system. Use the salts with the water to distribute and reshape the heat in your chosen colony site and you have something. Not only could you move the heat around, you could generate energy off the gradient. Probably not enough energy for anything substantial, but enough to have a cushion of some sort. Oddly, you wouldn't be bring water for crops or sustaining life, but merely to deal with the temperature.

    It's probably not the best idea for a colony, but a long term outpost might work. It'd probably be vastly expensive considering you'd either need to find a material to store the water/salt mixture in. Unless you found something surprising on the moon, you'd need to transport that material from the Earth to the Moon, too.
    Solfe

  3. #183
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    6,074
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I often wonder about the value of naturally occuring salt on the moon. Water is heavy to transport, but easier than He-3. If you could get enough water to the surface of the moon in a region that had both salt and a natural cave, lava tube or pit crater, you'd have yourself the makings of a radiator system. Use the salts with the water to distribute and reshape the heat in your chosen colony site and you have something. Not only could you move the heat around, you could generate energy off the gradient. Probably not enough energy for anything substantial, but enough to have a cushion of some sort. Oddly, you wouldn't be bring water for crops or sustaining life, but merely to deal with the temperature.

    It's probably not the best idea for a colony, but a long term outpost might work. It'd probably be vastly expensive considering you'd either need to find a material to store the water/salt mixture in. Unless you found something surprising on the moon, you'd need to transport that material from the Earth to the Moon, too.
    Salt deposits are extracted from weathering rock by water and concentrated in ancient sea and lake beds over many millions of years. Mars is covered in that kind of thing, but on the moon you're going to have to process rock and regoligh to extract the component elements, quite a bit of it to get chlorine or other water-soluble anions.

    The transport costs for the material for storage tanks would be in the rounding error of the costs of transporting the actual water, the mining machinery, etc.

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