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Thread: Space-Based Internet

  1. #1
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    Space-Based Internet

    Space-Based Internet will be one of the highlights for this year with at least 8 companies planning to implement the concept. Add to this China has also indicated they too will be entering this area.

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/tech...nternet-is-on/

    Internet access beamed down from space could drastically change the way we get online. Establishing quality high-speed satellite internet from low or medium earth orbit (LEO and MEO, respectively) would give whoever did it access to all 4 billion or so people who don't have Internet access yet. With enough bandwidth, such a network could become instant competitors to telecoms like AT&T and Verizon without the monumental infrastructure costs of putting down fiber. There are eight companies currently shooting for the goal, 2018 will be a big year for all of them, as Aviation Week notes.

    Some of these companies, like SpaceX, Samsung and Boeing, are well known. Others, like OneWeb, Telesat LEO, SES O3B,Iridium Next and LeoSat have less name recognition so far, but will help spur competition in the field.

    Webs of satellites seem to be a popular idea on how to achieve the goal. In 2015, Farooq Khan, president of Samsung Research America in Dallas, published a paper titled "Mobile Internet from the Heavens" in which he described a vision of "Internet services available to everyone in the world via low-cost micro-satellites."

  2. #2
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    Glom is offline Insert awesome title here
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    An Outernet if you will.

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    There are a number of posts on aspects of the Space-Based Internet market in the thread on OneWeb's international broadband Internet and mobile communications.

    Posts 5-12 especially relevant.

    It seems to be a dynamic area of active development in the space economy with substantial room for growth.

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    There's another type of "space based internet" - an interplanetary internet which connects Earth, spacecraft, space stations, and eventually Mars etc. It uses a protocol called Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) to optimize transmission.

    https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/he...ant_networking

    dtn-ssi_0.png

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    Space has a lot to offer to internet connectivity. But it does need to be carefully co-ordinated it seems...

    UK worries Starlink and OneWeb may interfere with each other, plans new rules

    A UK government agency is worried that OneWeb, SpaceX's Starlink, and similar low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-broadband systems could block each others' signals.

    Ofcom, the UK's communications regulator, proposed new rules today in a report that details its interference concerns. Ofcom also said it intends to amend satellite licenses already issued to SpaceX and OneWeb to require coordination of frequency use. Without new requirements, the risk of interference could prevent competition by shutting new players out of the market, Ofcom said.
    ofcom-satellite-systems.jpg

    Ofcom consultation (closes 20th September) is at:
    Ofcom NGSO licensing consultation

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    The new StarLink satellite total is ,

    29,988 satellites between 340 & 614 km in 9 inclinations. Global coverage, including the poles

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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    The new StarLink satellite total is ,

    29,988 satellites between 340 & 614 km in 9 inclinations. Global coverage, including the poles
    Holy bunnies, that is like five times the TOTAL number of satelites in orbit right now, that is gonna take one heck of a lot of management to avoid Kessler Cascades

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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    The new StarLink satellite total is ,

    29,988 satellites between 340 & 614 km in 9 inclinations. Global coverage, including the poles
    It’s certainly an impressive target.

    I suspect Ofcom are probably focused on satellites already in the pipeline, so the early phase Starlink shells 1-5 (see this post and link to Stuart Clark’s recent article in SpaceX thread).

    But it is quite possible that SpaceX will be launching their next phase of 4000 more satellites by 2027 before the launch of first gen of satellites by their competitors are completed, so strong is the SpaceX first mover advantage.

    And SpaceX delivery will accelerate once Starship is ready. While F9 has been able to launch 60 of the early sats at a time the Starship will be able to launch 400 at a time!

    Not sure what the timetable is for the 30k target, but it certainly seems deliverable with Starship.

    Regulation may be needed to make sure that competition is maintained and space junk collision risk is minimised.

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    Christian Davenport ✓ @wapodavenport
    Aug 26, 2021
    Another front in a growing rivalry: Amazon Urges FCC to Deny SpaceX's Plan for Second-Generation Starlink https://pcmag.com/news/amazon-urges-...ation-starlink #PCMag

    Amazon Urges FCC to Deny SpaceX's Plan for Second-Generation Starlink
    Amazon's own satellite broadband company, Kuiper Systems, claims SpaceX's proposals for the second-generation Starlink are too broad and speculative, and break FCC rules.
    pcmag.com
    |
    Elon Musk ✓ @elonmusk
    Turns out Besos retired in order to pursue a full-time job filing lawsuits against SpaceX …

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1431126154195443714

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    Bezos Alert

    Starlink did an FCC filing which proposed 2 paths forward; mostly Starship or mostly Falcon 9. This isn't unusual in International Telecommunications Union (ITU) filings, and apparently has been done at FCC as well.

    Naturally, Amazon filed a statement complaining "Too much information! Stop their deployment!"

    /sigh

    SpaceX has responded with both barrels...(attached PDF)

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1433102773013258242
    Attached Files Attached Files

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    SpaceX responded to Amazon's latest complaints to FCC

    PDF
    https://licensing.fcc.gov/myibfs/dow...t_key=13326224

    For its part Amazon has to launch half it's Kuiper constellation, >1,500 satellites, before 2026 but they have yet to file most of their plans; debris mitigation, collision risk, etc. A long list.

    Moreover, any new restrictions they manage to get applied to Starlink will also app!y to Kuiper in the future, so...why?

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    https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Tel...spots-in-Japan

    SpaceX and KDDI team up to eliminate wireless blind spots in Japan

    TOKYO -- KDDI, Japan's second-largest mobile provider, has emerged as one of SpaceX's partners in rolling out high-speed wireless coverage via satellites, Nikkei has learned, part of SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's goal of connecting the entire world to the internet.

    SpaceX has launched hundreds of Starlink telecommunications satellites with the goal of fully starting services in Japan by the end of the year. KDDI and SpaceX will begin a network proving test in Japan this month, and coverage is expected to be commercially available next year.

    The pair will start by offering internet service to customers living in mountainous regions and islands for no additional charge. The satellite network will also serve as backup in case terrestrial telecom lines are disrupted during natural disasters or blackouts.
    >

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    Starlink exits beta testing in October

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1438748063527575555

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    Docmordrid posted here in the SpaceX thread recently about Starlink developing a presence in India.

    It has previously been suggest that Oneweb may have an advantage there because of a large stake owned by Bharti Global, a major Indian conglomerate. OneWeb is also partially owned by the UK, which could help smooth access in countries with links to Britain.

    The following recent article gives more on OneWeb plans in India and suggests that all three potential providers (Starlink, Oneweb and Telesat) need clarity from India's government on some key issues, including a fight between satellite and cellular players over the 28GHz band. It illustrates the importance of space internet providers working together on issues as well as competing.

    https://advanced-television.com/2021...-india-launch/

    Satellite broadband operator OneWeb, flush with $1 billion of insurance cover on its remaining 10 launches, is readying its business plans.

    The operator already has 322 satellites in orbit out of its full constellation target of 648 craft and the latest batch of 36 satellites are being prepared by Arianespace for launch next month having arrived at Ignatievo Airport in Russia from their construction facility in Florida.

    Meanwhile, Bharti, a major investor in OneWeb, is busy building two ground-based gateways in order to connect with the overhead satellites. OneWeb is aiming for a service introduction in India by mid-2022.

    However, OneWeb – and potential rival Telesat of Canada as well as Elon Musk’s Starlink service – need clarity from India’s government on ‘landing rights’ and how the administration sees a sharing of spectrum. Questions have been asked over the 28 GHz band which is being looked at by satellite operators as well as cellular players in India...

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    Good lord...

    https://tass.com/science/1347023

    Starlink satellites can be used to change flight path of missiles — Roscosmos chief

    According to Rogozin, Starlink can also be used to deliver "purely political, and, most likely, anti-Russian content" directly to mobile phones

    MOSCOW, October 7. /TASS/. /TASS/. Roscosmos Director General Dmitry Rogozin believes that Starlink satellites, launched by Elon Musk’s company SpaceX, can be used for military purposes in the future, including for changing the flight path of cruise missiles and managing spy networks.

    "This year, they [SpaceX] received about $900 million [in state subsidies], the entire subsidy for the forthcoming period is $20 billion. So, a question arises: why would the government do that? And the answer is: those spacecraft provide internet connection, they can become a platform for steering cruise missiles, for changing their flight path when they are already in flight. [They can also be used] for sending orders to special forces, to networks of agents," he said.

    According to Rogozin, Starlink can also be used to deliver "purely political, and, most likely, anti-Russian content" directly to mobile phones.

    Rogozin went on to say that by now, about 1,800 Starlink satellites were delivered to the orbit. The next state of the project envisages the launch of 17,000 spacecraft. Eventually, Starlink’s orbital constellation will comprise about 42,000 satellites.

    "We won’t just sit and wait, of course. We have our own project, Sfera. It was presented to the president earlier this year, and we plan to orbit hundreds of our own satellites to protect our sovereignty," Rogozin said.

  16. #16
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    Elon Musk ✓ @elonmusk
    Should be nationwide [US] rollout by end of month. Note, still limited by peak number of users in same area.

    This will improve as more satellites are launched.
    |
    Starlink is designed for low to medium population density, which means we can hit max users in some areas fast.

    Please sign up early to ensure a spot. As more satellites roll out, SpaceX will be able to serve more.
    |
    Yes, we are talking to airlines about installing Starlink. Please let them know if you want it on your airliner.

    Low latency ~half gigabit connectivity in the air!

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1446125039447777282
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1446125877494833162
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1448668361945231362

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    spacex launches starlink satellites after upgrading user antennas

    TAMPA, Fla. — SpaceX successfully deployed another 53 Starlink satellites Nov. 13 in its first dedicated launch for the broadband constellation in two months…..

    Starlink services

    Starlink is serving about 140,000 users across 20 countries, according to a presentation SpaceX filed with the Federal Communications Commission Nov. 10, up about 40,000 from what it reported in August.

    It said it had received more than 750,000 “orders/deposits globally” for the service.

    However, pandemic-related silicon shortages have been delaying production and impacting its ability to fulfill orders.

    Antennas have been a major sticking point for the company as it heavily subsidizes them to encourage adoption.

    On Nov. 10, the FCC approved a new Starlink antenna that SpaceX has said would be cheaper to produce, although it continues to charge customers $499 for the hardware needed to connect to Starlink’s services.

    The new rectangular dish is also thinner and lighter than its circular predecessor.

    Starlink’s beta users have been using a 23-inch-wide, 16-pound circular user terminal for more than a year where the broadband services are available. They now have the option of buying a dish that is 12 inches wide and 19 inches long, weighing 16 pounds….

    Speaking at the Space Symposium Aug. 24, SpaceX president and chief operating officer Gwynne Shotwell said the company was aiming to reduce the cost of making its user terminals by half before the end of 2021, “and then we think we’ll be able to cut that in half yet again.”

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    intelsat and oneweb demonstrate integrated geo and leo broadband service
    November 15th

    WASHINGTON — In a demonstration earlier this month, Intelsat and OneWeb provided broadband internet service to U.S. Army users via satellites in low Earth orbit and in geostationary orbit.

    The event at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, was an attempt to show Army buyers that satellite communications from LEO and GEO is not an either-or proposition, and both can be seamlessly integrated.

    Intelsat is a global communications firm that operates 52 GEO satellites stationed 22,000 miles above the equator. OneWeb currently has 358 broadband LEO satellites in near polar orbit planes at an altitude of 750…..

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