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Thread: The Curious Career of Dr. Lirpa Sloof

  1. #1
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    The Curious Career of Dr. Lirpa Sloof

    On my Tumblr blog, I am attempting to aggregate all known news stories about the mysterious polymath Dr. Lirpa Sloof (sometimes known as Dr. Sloof Lirpa). Despite having been responsible for some of the most revolutionary inventions and scientific discoveries of the late 20th and early 21st centuries in fields as diverse as geology, sports medicine, information technology, and aerospace engineering, there is little concrete information about Dr. Sloof available on the Internet. Reports cannot agree as to whether Dr. Sloof is male or female and whether they are Hungarian, Indian, Belgian, East Slobovian, or of another nationality, what degrees they hold, and where they studied. In the past few years, Dr. Sloof has been variously employed at the FBI, Netflix, the Associated Press, the Department of Homeland Security, the World Wildlife Fund, and Polaroid, often in high positions, apparently held simultaneously.

    Dr. Sloof is clearly quite the multitasker, and their known inventions to date include a symphony played entirely on rocket motors, software letting webmasters remotely activate the webcams of website visitors, a cure for asthma, a system for digital-to-analogue audio conversion, a safer means of drilling for oil, free energy, perpetual motion, a machine that turns fire into ice, and self-healing nail polish.

    My timeline of news coverage of Dr. Sloof can be seen here, and I am curious to know if other CQ users know of of any exploits by this mysterious genius that I have missed.

    Perhaps the only clear fact about Dr. Sloof is that all publications about their work to date have occurred on either March 31st or April 1st. This is perhaps only natural as "Lirpa Sloof" spelled backwards is, of course, APRIL FOOLS!

  2. #2
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    That reminds me of a prank a few years ago, when someone reported that a loof lirpa had escaped from the National Zoo in Washington and was at large in a nearby residential area. The prankster described it as resembling a large antelope, and a news reporter fell for it.

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    Today is my niece's birthday. She's chosen to get married tomorrow, instead.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Actually the Sloof family has a rich tradition of discovery and adventure that Lirpa has continued.

    Lirpa's great grandparent (also of unknown gender, nationality, and even species), Palir Sloof, was reportedly the co-inventor of toast, and also assisted Henry Ford with building of the Model T by inventing the license plate frame, and suggesting the "T" (they may also have suggested black, as a color that goes with everything).

    A cousin, Rilap Sloof, discovered the gall bladder, and was instrumental in popularizing what is now the fifth favorite gastrointestinal organ, according to recent surveys.

    Another cousin, Ralip Sloof, was the first person to roller blade down Mount Shasta, and was the first Le Cordon Bleu trained master chef on a nuclear submarine.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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    It always fascinates me how ludicrously contrived a story (or even a character's name) can be and still be accepted, even when people are reading it on April 1st.
    Yesterday, I posted a bizarre review of some imaginary virtual reality gear for hikers, which I felt started beyond belief and then pushed the credulity boat out beyond the horizon, but I seem to have had at least one person believe the whole thing, on the day.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
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    The BBC are proud of one of the great achievements in the sixties, and Sloof must have been there, or his ancester, another Loof, there's no Loof like an Old Loof, I refer to the spaghetti trees in Italy and the coverage of the Italian ritual of harvesting the crop and serving it fresh. The reporter was Cliff Michelmore. I think this video refers:
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8Sr5ScdFUo
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    It always fascinates me how ludicrously contrived a story (or even a character's name) can be and still be accepted, even when people are reading it on April 1st.
    Yesterday, I posted a bizarre review of some imaginary virtual reality gear for hikers, which I felt started beyond belief and then pushed the credulity boat out beyond the horizon, but I seem to have had at least one person believe the whole thing, on the day.

    Grant Hutchison
    While researching my post, I found many posts on crank-physics websites by people who believed that an April Fools Day video of "Dr. Lirpa Sloof's Free Energy Device" was real. It's right there in the name, people!

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    It always fascinates me how ludicrously contrived a story (or even a character's name) can be and still be accepted, even when people are reading it on April 1st.
    Yesterday, I posted a bizarre review of some imaginary virtual reality gear for hikers, which I felt started beyond belief and then pushed the credulity boat out beyond the horizon, but I seem to have had at least one person believe the whole thing, on the day.

    Grant Hutchison
    The nature center where I volunteer participates in Cornell University's Project Feeder Watch, which is a citizen science program monitoring bird populations. I was there on Saturday and among other tasks was recording our information for Feeder Watch. I listed, among the species I saw, "Ivory-billed Woodpecker" (I saw four of them).

    I hope, whoever eventually data-enters the information into Cornell's website, looks at the date of the observation, and realizes that the Ivory-billed was never native to Ohio, and is in all likelihood extinct (and has been for 60 years).
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I hope, whoever eventually data-enters the information into Cornell's website, looks at the date of the observation, and realizes that the Ivory-billed was never native to Ohio, and is in all likelihood extinct (and has been for 60 years).
    If it had been me, I think I would have made it more obvious, just to be sure. So, start with the ivory-billed woodpecker, later in the list add the passenger pigeon, and finish up with archaeopteryx.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey View Post
    If it had been me, I think I would have made it more obvious, just to be sure. So, start with the ivory-billed woodpecker, later in the list add the passenger pigeon, and finish up with archaeopteryx.
    Agreed. Using an ambiguously-extinct bird that's very famous sounds just plausible enough to possibly cause problems somewhere down the line.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Agreed. Using an ambiguously-extinct bird that's very famous sounds just plausible enough to possibly cause problems somewhere down the line.
    Speaking of "problems somewhere down the line":
    Back when I was about 12 years old, some psychology students subjected me and my classmates to a psychology questionnaire - presumably with the school's cooperation, since we were placed in the school hall under "exam conditions" for an hour or so. They ended up doing it on April 1st. A lot of the questions were of the kind "Write down the first thing that comes into your head when you look at this image / read the following sentence ..."
    One of my classmates adopted the high-risk April Fool strategy of writing "mother", "blood" and "axe" in response to all these questions.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
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  12. #12
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    What's this about "Larping Slooh" telescope members again?

    How would you even do that?

    I've got to go back fixing this turboencabulator again...

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    What difference does it make what race or gender he is, if he participated in the creation of innovative things. His contribution to science is huge!

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