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Thread: Whatcha Eatin?

  1. #1081
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    We have discussed the differences, or not, between Lobster, Crayfish, Crawfish etc previously. A couple of days ago our son invited us to have tea at his house. He had been down to the southern part of W.A., about 200 km south, and brought back some live Marron. They are a native freshwater crustacean like Crawfish, based on photos on the web anyway.

    I don't like the taste of crustaceans but did try a very small bit. To me it tasted like a prawn (shrimp). My wife said that she prefered their taste to Crayfish/Lobster as the flesh was sweeter and smoother. They were anesthetised in the freezer before being cooked and eaten.

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  2. #1082
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    We have discussed the differences, or not, between Lobster, Crayfish, Crawfish etc previously. A couple of days ago our son invited us to have tea at his house. He had been down to the southern part of W.A., about 200 km south, and brought back some live Marron. They are a native freshwater crustacean like Crawfish, based on photos on the web anyway.

    I don't like the taste of crustaceans but did try a very small bit. To me it tasted like a prawn (shrimp). My wife said that she prefered their taste to Crayfish/Lobster as the flesh was sweeter and smoother. They were anesthetised in the freezer before being cooked and eaten.

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    Looks good! I don't remember every discussing it, but I think that crayfish/crawfish, and in your case, marrons (never heard of them) are freshwater relatives of lobsters.
    As above, so below

  3. #1083
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    Crayfish, in Western Australia, are our saltwater version of Lobsters but without claws. They are sold outside Australia as Western Rock Lobster as a marketing ploy. But the term Lobster/Crayfish is becoming interchangeable. Here is a 'stock' photo of some. Marron, gilgie, koonak and yabby are freshwater crustaceans we can catch here. Only the first three are native to W.A.

    Edit I have found a photo of some my son caught a few years ago. The legal minimum size is 76 mm (around 3 inches) for the carapace i.e from the middle of the front of the head to the start of the tail. These were all legal. The bag limit is 8 per day and you must have a licence. There were a couple of licensed people on his boat.

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    https://marinewaters.fish.wa.gov.au/...er-Cray-ID.pdf

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    Last edited by ozduck; 2020-Jun-05 at 10:16 AM.

  4. #1084
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Crayfish, in Western Australia, are our saltwater version of Lobsters but without claws.
    I'm sorry, but the file you linked to seems to contradict that, because it uses the term "freshwater crayfish," which seems to imply that in Australia, "crayfish" is used for both saltwater and freshwater crustaceans. So I guess that in Western Australia you use a different terminology from the official government terminology? I think that is fairly common, so I'm not being critical, just clarifying.
    As above, so below

  5. #1085
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Crayfish, in Western Australia, are our saltwater version of Lobsters but without claws. They are sold outside Australia as Western Rock Lobster as a marketing ploy. But the term Lobster/Crayfish is becoming interchangeable. Here is a 'stock' photo of some. Marron, gilgie, koonak and yabby are freshwater crustaceans we can catch here. Only the first three are native to W.A.

    Edit I have found a photo of some my son caught a few years ago. The legal minimum size is 76 mm (around 3 inches) for the carapace i.e from the middle of the front of the head to the start of the tail. These were all legal. The bag limit is 8 per day and you must have a licence. There were a couple of licensed people on his boat.

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    https://marinewaters.fish.wa.gov.au/...er-Cray-ID.pdf

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    We'd call those clawless ones "spiny lobsters". They are "crayfish" in NZ as well.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #1086
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
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    Those look lovely. The fact sheet was an interesting read and I'm a bit envious of the sizes reached by those species. I was also a little amused at a coincidence. Besides being a big fan of seafood (especially shellfish) I'm also a bit of a wine enthusiast. A US magazine recently published a list of wine recommendations and just last night, I had entered a few of the more affordable ones into my cellar app wish list so they'd be ready at hand in the shops. One of them is from the Margaret River region so it made me smile to read that the hairy maroon makes its home there. Alas, the particular wine recommended, a Cabernet Sauvignon, isn't a natural pairing with seafood. They do make Chardonnay, though. If only I could pop in for a taste of both.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2020-Jun-05 at 03:47 PM. Reason: removed paragraph meant for another thread.
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  7. #1087
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I'm sorry, but the file you linked to seems to contradict that, because it uses the term "freshwater crayfish," which seems to imply that in Australia, "crayfish" is used for both saltwater and freshwater crustaceans. So I guess that in Western Australia you use a different terminology from the official government terminology? I think that is fairly common, so I'm not being critical, just clarifying.
    Yes, we normally call the freshwater crayfish by their actual names Marron etc and would really only use Crayfish for the salt water ones.

    PetersCreek

    Margaret River is a great place to visit not only for wineries but caves, surfing, scenic drives, restaurants etc. It is only about 3 hours south of here. I am not a big fan of Chardonnay, mainly because a lot of producers produced heavily 'oaked' versions 20 or so years ago. That fad has gone but I am still a bit suspicious of them. I do prefer a nice Cab Sav but agree that it is not really right for Marron.

  8. #1088
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Margaret River is a great place to visit not only for wineries but caves, surfing, scenic drives, restaurants etc.
    Oh, I believe it. The writer who recommended that wine said MR "is perhaps the most beautiful wine-growing area I've ever seen." I've been in some really picturesque wine regions, so I just had to google the area for images. What little I've seen so far puts it high on my international travel wish list.

    Also in wine-related amusement: it seems I can't quite make a mental shift when reading about Margaret River and other wine regions in that part of Australia. Whenever I see "WA", my mind jumps about 9,000 miles to Washington State...because the postal abbreviation is also WA and we really like the wines and the area.
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  9. #1089
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    One of my work mates was stopped by police while driving in the U.S and the officer was convinced that he was from Washington State because his Drivers Licence said W.A. on the front.

    Just to wet your appetite a couple of my photos of Wineries in that area. One, Voyager Estate, is built in "Cape Dutch" style and is known for its Chardonnay. The other is in more typical local style. The artwork is known colloquially as "Chick on a Stick". This is our premium wine area so the prices are not cheap. Plus a scenic drive through a Karri forest about 20 minutes away from the wineries.

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  10. #1090
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    A delicious Hawaiian burger. Composed of:
    Ground beef, not native to Hawaii.
    A wheat bun, not native to Hawaii.
    A pineapple slice, native to South America.
    Some Roquefort Cheese, native to France.
    Some teriyaki sauce, native to Japan.
    And grilled onions, darned if I know where they originated, but this one probably grew in Mexico.

    So not very Hawaiian, but still delicious.

    Oh, that reminds me! I should see what Kilauea is doing!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  11. #1091
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    Had a nice lunch at the Denali Brew Pub during our day trip to Talkeetna today. I had the “Fireweed” ham sandwich and a refreshing pilsner.

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  12. #1092
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    Family-size box of Crunch-'n-Munch, buttery toffee with peanuts. The whole box, by myself.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #1093
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    Raisin Bran, because it's good for my GI tract!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #1094
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    Southern style biscuits and gravy...healthified somewhat by substitution of chicken sausage for the beloved pork.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  15. #1095
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    My daughter-in-law dropped this off to us yesterday. She made it all herself and then wrapped up in the box with a bow. The contents are Pandan Chiffon cupcakes topped with Crème fraîche and a strawberry. Plus Pandan Crepes rolled and filled with Palm Sugar and coconut (kueh dadar). The Red grapefruit is from their tree plus an uncut one on the lid. The bigger of the other two fruits is Rambutan and the other is Longan. These two fruits are both related to lychee but taste much nicer.

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