Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 47 of 47

Thread: The Expanse, on SyFy - Spoilers!

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    The Space Coast
    Posts
    4,675
    I have not (yet) read the books, but I unreservedly recommend the TV series!

    CJSF
    "The sun is a quagmire
    It's not made of fire
    Forget what you've been told in the past
    Electrons are free
    (Plasma!) Fourth state of matter
    Not gas, not liquid, not solid"

    -They Might Be Giants, "Why Does The Sun Really Shine?"


    lonelybirder.org

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18
    So how do people feel about the Amazon Prime season?

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    19,215
    It was okay, it kept my interest but I’m not a huge fan of the Expanse, either in TV or book form. There are some things I like, but early on in the books and tv series I didn’t care for (for instance) space zombies or stealth ships with fusion drives accelerating at multiple Gs that should be obvious across the solar system, and I still have issues with it. On the other hand, there are story elements and technical aspects I like. I think I initially got annoyed though seeing this put on a pedestal for claimed technical accuracy.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,626
    Quote Originally Posted by 23rd Estate View Post
    So how do people feel about the Amazon Prime season?
    I'll skip it. I don't subscribe to Amazon Prime, and the third season went from not-that-engaging to actively annoying for me, so it didn't encourage me to let Amazon any farther into my life. And, anyway, I'm never short of stuff to watch during the limited amount of time I can spare for TV.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    37,980
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I think I initially got annoyed though seeing this put on a pedestal for claimed technical accuracy.
    Compared to most TV sci-fi, which is pure magical Fantasy in a SF candy coating, The Expanse at least acknowledges that there is such a thing as the laws of physics. If only to lampshade its violations of them.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    19,215
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Compared to most TV sci-fi, which is pure magical Fantasy in a SF candy coating, The Expanse at least acknowledges that there is such a thing as the laws of physics. If only to lampshade its violations of them.
    Well, I read the first book in the series quite some time before the series and it was being pushed as diamond hard science fiction. I was (and still am) looking for hard science fiction set off earth in the solar system, and so I was hopeful for this, but it had things like spinning Ceres up for gravity (which would undoubtedly come apart if the spin up worked at all - and the requirements to spin up that much mass are insane) as well as a number of other issues, a couple already mentioned. I haven’t read past the first book.

    I actually like the show more because it doesn’t get into the details as often and there things I like about it - the visuals are great, for one thing. But parts are dull and it is never going to be a favorite.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,626
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Well, I read the first book in the series quite some time before the series and it was being pushed as diamond hard science fiction. I was (and still am) looking for hard science fiction set off earth in the solar system, and so I was hopeful for this, but it had things like spinning Ceres up for gravity (which would undoubtedly come apart if the spin up worked at all - and the requirements to spin up that much mass are insane) as well as a number of other issues, a couple already mentioned. I haven’t read past the first book.
    I think the Expanse books bear the same relationship to the mythical Perfect Hard SF Novel as Western genre novels bear to the real history of the American West. They use a lot of the standard narrative furniture the reader is familiar with, but they don't fuss too much getting everything right.

    Grant Hutchison

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    37,980
    I am a fan of all kinds of SF, but I generally prefer that any "soft" elements at least be internally consistent.

    I don't think The Expanse actually pitches itself on its "hardness", rather the label was slapped on the franchise by fans and critics. They saw ships under acceleration and went, "Whoa! There's no gravity generators perpendicular to the direction of travel! HARD SCIENCE!!!!"
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18
    Fetishizing hard sci-fi in a mainstream mass audience medium is a fool's errand, anyhow.

    That said, the protomolecule definitely shows the authors' A Song of Ice and Fire roots. It's essentially a sci-fi deus ex machina that serves as an Outside Context Problem.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    37,980
    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    I watched last night's episode and I am a little confused by one scene. When the 2 belters (uncle and nephew) are first shown, after the nephew plants the charges and heads back to their ship, his uncle raises his visor(!!!!!) and takes a breath. IN SPACE. Did I miss something about that which made sense? He has something on his forehead, I think? Did I see that right, or is my mind going??

    CJSF
    Trying to hold your breath in vacuum could rupture your lungs by pressure differential. I think he was letting out his breath, as recommended by veteran space programs.

    ADDED: I see this was already addressed upthread. Oops!

    ADDED 2: I can't be sure why he's doing so without reviewing the scene, but I think he was removing something from inside his helmet.
    Last edited by Noclevername; 2020-Sep-08 at 01:42 PM.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,626
    For anyone who finds themselves in this situation, probably the best strategy is to breathe out partially (to the bottom of your normal tidal breathing) before you open your helmet, and then keep mouth wide open and vocal cords parted (say "ah"). You want to have lung tissue unstretched, but avoid small airway closure--so neither at peak inspiration or at maximal expiration--and you want the pressure in your lungs to fall quickly, to minimize the length of time during which there's a pressure gradient across lung tissue.
    Or so a close reading of the sparse experimental data from the 1950s and '60s suggests.

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    37,980
    The Expanse is to hard SF what carob is to chocolate: a similar substitution, but not as satisfying once consumed.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    9,495
    The last book in the series was just announced: Leviathan Falls
    https://www.jamessacorey.com/news/
    All comments made in red are moderator comments. Please, read the rules of the forum here, the special rules for the ATM section here and conspiracy theories. If you think a post is inappropriate, don't comment on it in thread but report it using the /!\ button in the lower left corner of each message. But most of all, have fun!

    Catch me on twitter: @tusenfem
    Catch Rosetta Plasma Consortium on twitter: @Rosetta_RPC

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,945
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    For anyone who finds themselves in this situation, probably the best strategy is to breathe out partially (to the bottom of your normal tidal breathing) before you open your helmet, and then keep mouth wide open and vocal cords parted (say "ah"). You want to have lung tissue unstretched, but avoid small airway closure--

    Grant Hutchison
    I wonder if it might also be wise to have a tube in ones throat beforehand so as to have a quick airway access in case tissues encroach.

    In terms of suspended animation, I can’t help but think that each organ needs such separate care to the point that the subject would be all but vivisected.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    37,980
    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    I wonder if it might also be wise to have a tube in ones throat beforehand so as to have a quick airway access in case tissues encroach.
    Lung air pressure would be stronger than soft tissue pressure until it equalized.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  16. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,626
    It's difficult to imagine the circumstances under which a tube in one's throat would be a practical advantage. Getting yourself a tracheostomy is not without risk or inconvenience, and it seems excessive as some sort of insurance policy against future vacuum exposure. An endotracheal tube might be inserted in an emergency, but it requires a certain amount of skill, and isn't well tolerated, such that most people require local anaesthesia and sedation--not ideal, under the imagined circumstances.
    Soft tissues swell to about twice their size, almost immediately on decompression, with a tissue pressure of 47mmHg (vapour pressure of water at body temperature). Lungs empty exponentially, with the big risk of pressure pneuomothorax in the first few seconds. Even if tissues close off the airway, the barrier to expiration would be considerably less than 47mmHg, so any pressure left in the lungs would be physiologically tolerable. Airway obstruction was not a reported feature of the animal experiments back in the '50s and '60s.
    Immediately on repressurization after any survivable vacuum exposure, the tissues collapse back to normal size, so the airway would return to normal.
    My summary of the experimental data is here, including links to the relevant papers.

    Grant Hutchison

  17. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,193
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think the Expanse books bear the same relationship to the mythical Perfect Hard SF Novel as Western genre novels bear to the real history of the American West. They use a lot of the standard narrative furniture the reader is familiar with, but they don't fuss too much getting everything right.
    Just breaking in to say how struck I was by the phrase "narrative furniture", and how often it springs to my mind as I continue my Lockdown Horror and Science-Fiction DVR Film Festival. (At one point I thought the movies had hit bottom when an underwater zombie bit a shark, but I should have known better).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •