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Thread: American human space capsule

  1. #121
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    Boeing under special NASA scrutiny after Starliner fiasco.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...hes/ar-BBZWNq8
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  2. #122
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    As well they should be.
    Scott Manley points out that these failures weren't in software for some obscure function, but features depended upon for every flight.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    As well they should be.
    Scott Manley points out that these failures weren't in software for some obscure function, but features depended upon for every flight.
    I watched Scott's video on this too and I found that really remarkable. None of the software failures were some weird combination of unforeseen conditions, nor some hardware failure, they were all problems in the standard sequence of programming steps that were planned for this mission. These are problems that should have been found on the first run through of the software.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  4. #124
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    We've had one* of these at ESA where apparently ATV couldn't see the difference between docking to ISS head first or tail first, but at least that was discovered during an early simulation as it should be.


    (*) it's programming, I'm sure they had countless of these oopsies, just like any other space agency or breathing creature remotely involved with programming. The key is to catch these big errors before shooting things into space. There's still plenty of subtle stuff in code with less subtle outcome to solve after that.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  5. #125
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    Starliner presser today - this sums it up

    Tim Fernholz ✓ @timfernholz
    Boeing VP John Mulholland keeps getting asked why and how the company made Starliner test decisions that allowed multiple mistakes to slip through, and won't answer the question.

    https://twitter.com/timfernholz/stat...36763277758464

    Marina Koren ✔ @marinakoren
    Replying to @marinakoren
    Mulholland tells me that after audit of the flight software is done, they'll be able to say exactly how many issues they had (so far, there's a few). Says the NASA astronauts assigned to the first crewed mission are "supportive," have visited Boeing since the botched mission
    ||
    Wow: At beginning of presser, Mulholland said this Orlando Sentinel report "mischaracterized" Boeing's testing. But later, when pressed, he confirmed what @ChabeliH reported. Boeing didn't run this end-to-end test, but it will do it now, Mulholland says

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/spac...ahu-story.html

    Boeing didn’t perform full end-to-end test of its astronaut capsule before troubled mission,...

    A panel learned early this month that Boeing did not perform a full, end-to-end integrated test of Starliner in a Systems Integration Lab with ULA’s Atlas V rocket. It’s the kind of test that could...

    https://twitter.com/marinakoren/stat...40862656507904

  6. #126
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    "NASA investigation finds 61 corrective actions for Boeing after failed Starliner spacecraft mission"

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/06/nasa...pacecraft.html

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s investigation into Boeing’s failed December spaceflight came up with a long list of corrections needed before the company flies again.

    Boeing said Friday that the investigation found about 61 “corrective actions” for the company’s Starliner spacecraft, which it has been developing to fly NASA astronauts. NASA associate administrator Doug Loverro told reporters on a conference call that he expects it “will take several months” for Boeing to work through the list.

    “This was a close call. We could have lost a spacecraft twice during this mission,” Loverro said.
    I am because we are
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  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    "NASA investigation finds 61 corrective actions for Boeing after failed Starliner spacecraft mission"

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/06/nasa...pacecraft.html
    Which has already been linked and discussed in the Starliner thread.

  8. #128
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    The single most concerning thing here is the degree of involvement Boeing has with the SLS. After the 737 MAX, KC-46 and Starliner issues its hard to have a great deal of confidence. A Starliner type glitch on the SLS test and you could be looking at years of delay, not months.

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    The single most concerning thing here is the degree of involvement Boeing has with the SLS. After the 737 MAX, KC-46 and Starliner issues its hard to have a great deal of confidence. A Starliner type glitch on the SLS test and you could be looking at years of delay, not months.
    Starliner is, being kind and in military-speak, a Charlie Foxtrot. If rumors are true, it gets worse.

    We know their original 2010 CCDev contract had risk reduction funding foe the circumferential bolted seam holding together the two clamshell domes. We also know there was problem with the thermal vacuum test 2 years ago. In the recent teleconference there was mention of a cold spot in the capsule.

    My spider-sense is tingling like a 480 volt line hit it .

    NASA images of the clamshell domes

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/second-...lorida-factory

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Starliner is, being kind and in military-speak, a Charlie Foxtrot. If rumors are true, it gets worse.

    We know their original 2010 CCDev contract had risk reduction funding foe the circumferential bolted seam holding together the two clamshell domes. We also know there was problem with the thermal vacuum test 2 years ago. In the recent teleconference there was mention of a cold spot in the capsule.

    My spider-sense is tingling like a 480 volt line hit it .

    NASA images of the clamshell domes

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/second-...lorida-factory
    Yeah, I can see this winding up as 'hangar queen', and I wouldn't be suprised that if Dreamchaser nails its CRS-2 missions the manned version gets a crew contract, while some excuse is found for Boeing to bow out. Article below discusses the cargo Dreamchaser, the controversy over the award of the contract to Boeing/Starliner and that work on the manned version is still ongoing despite getting no funding:

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019...version-alive/

  11. #131
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    We have progress. SpaceX aiming for a manned flight in May

    https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/S...orida_999.html

    SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell said Tuesday the company is "gunning" for a May launch of astronauts from Florida, while NASA said only that it hopes for a launch sometime in the second quarter.

    SpaceX is poised to be the first private company to fly NASA astronauts. The company's successful in-flight test in January showed that the capsule could carry people to safety in an emergency.

    "We're gunning for May. We have work to do, NASA has work to do," Shotwell said at the Satellite 2020 conference in Washington, D.C., according to CNBC.

    The flight would carry astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station. The space station has only been accessible to American astronauts through the purchase of seats on Russian capsules since the last shuttle launch in 2011.
    I am because we are
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  12. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Starliner is, being kind and in military-speak, a Charlie Foxtrot. If rumors are true, it gets worse.
    Interesting:

    Responding to a question on the matter by Reuters space reporter Joey Roulette, Boeing Space confirmed that "#Starliner uses a Power Converter Unit provided by Zao Orbita in Voronezh, Russia."

    https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/B...liner_999.html

  13. #133
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    I worked for Boeing Commercial Airplanes until 10 years ago. If there was any way they could have work done by someone other than regular Boeing employees, that was how they did it. Employees were first, last, and only an expense. Our skills and experience were of little or no value.

    If that sounds like I'm bitter, you're right.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #134
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    Crew*Dragon DM-2 to ISS: late May, 2020

    https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/n...ica-since-2011

    March 18, 2020

    MEDIA ADVISORY M20-041

    NASA, SpaceX Invite Media to First Crew Launch to Station from America Since 2011

    *
    Media accreditation is open for NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 flight test, which will send two astronauts to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. This mission will be the return of human spaceflight launch capabilities to the United States and the first launch of American astronauts aboard an American rocket and spacecraft since the final space shuttle mission on July 8, 2011.

    SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will launch Crew Dragon, with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley aboard the spacecraft, from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA and SpaceX are currently targeting no earlier than mid-to-late May for launch.

    This second demonstration mission of the Crew Dragon spacecraft is another end-to-end flight test of SpaceX’s human spaceflight system, which will include launch, docking, splashdown and recovery operations. It is the final flight test of the system before SpaceX is certified to carry out operational crew flights to and from the space station for NASA.

    Media accreditations deadlines are as follows:

    ·* * * International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 4 p.m. EDT Friday, April 17.
    ·* * * U.S. media must apply by 4 p.m. Friday, April 24.
    All accreditation requests should be submitted online at:
    https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

    NASA is proactively monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation as it evolves. The agency will continue to follow guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the agency’s chief health and medical officer and communicate any updates that may impact mission planning or media access, as they become available.

    For questions about accreditation, please email*

    ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov.*

    For other questions, contact Kennedy’s newsroom at 321-867-2468.

    Reporters with special logistics requests for Kennedy, such as space for satellite trucks, trailers, tents, electrical connections or work spaces, must contact Tiffany Fairley at*

    tiffany.l.fairley@nasa.gov*by Friday, April 24.

    NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is working with the American aerospace industry through a public-private partnership to launch astronauts on American rockets and spacecraft from American soil. The goal of the program is to provide safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation to and from the space station, which will allow for additional research time and will increase the opportunity for discovery aboard humanity’s testbed for exploration. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in space exploration, including future missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.

    For launch coverage and more information about the mission, visit:

    https://www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew

    -end-

    1584901488399.jpg
    NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken familiarize themselves with SpaceX’s Crew Dragon, the spacecraft that will transport them to the International Space Station as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. Their upcoming flight test is known as Demo-2, short for Demonstration Mission 2. The Crew Dragon will launch on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
    Credits: NASA

  15. #135
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    Well, that's probably the most extreme form of social distancing.

  16. #136
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    NASA ASAP report, their safety panel ...

    https://spacenews.com/safety-panel-c...t-is-feasible/

    SpaceX Crew Dragon

    NASA ASAP says there are a few Crew Dragon DM-2 issues to resolve, but May is possible.

    Boeing Starliner

    Sounds like Starliner may not fly astronauts in 2021.

    “Much remains to be resolved before they will be expected to be certified for human spaceflight,” Sanders said of Boeing, saying that work goes beyond a second OFT mission.

    That second flight, she said, “is not sufficient to address the concerns that have arisen following the OFT, and we continue to strongly advise NASA to ensure that the underlying technical and organization or cultural shortcomings uncovered during the investigation of the mishap and subsequent reviews are fully addressed and mitigated before any attempt to launch astronauts on the vehicle.

  17. #137
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    SpaceX Crew Dragon DM-2 is on for May 27. Webcast & cable
    programming begins at 1215 Eastern on NASA TV.

    Neat video on Twitter

    NASA ✔ @NASA
    Together with @SpaceX, we will return human spaceflight to American soil after nearly a decade. May 27 is not only a big day for our teams – it’s a big day for our country.

    What does our @Commercial_Crew launch mean to YOU? Share using #LaunchAmerica: https://go.nasa.gov/2AeqVnF

    https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1259151815255502848
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-May-14 at 06:06 AM.

  18. #138
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    SpaceX has a docking simulator that’s supposed to have the same controls as the real Dragon capsule. Don’t expect a lot of excitement, and I probably use more fuel than they would, as I approach fairly quickly, but I had little trouble docking. Good to know if ever in an emergency situation .

    Link:

    https://iss-sim.spacex.com/

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  19. #139
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    In terms of the Orion capsule—I read (from space daily) that part of the splashdown recovery is called...mmph...is called [cough]...
    “Sasquatch”

    The jokes—they write themselves.

    I’m surprised Coast-to-Coast hasn’t done a bit on this.

    Really, NASA? REALLY?

    You know, I made myself look really foolish over the years trying to defend Old Space—and you “steely eyed” missile-men go and pull this stunt?

    I give up

  20. #140
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    The suits are so cool, not looking like a deflated pumpkin...

    Michael Sheetz ✔ @thesheetztweetz (CNBC)
    SpaceX confirms: The company's next launch will be its first with people on board.

    The Demo-2 mission is set to launch NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on May 27.

    IMG_20200518_123746.jpg

    https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/...68148671664128

    Eric Berger ✓ @SciGuySpace (Ars Technica)
    Commercial crew update:

    • May 27th still a good date for launch
    • NASA and SpaceX down to working fewer than 10 issues
    • Crew flies from Houston to Florida on Wednesday
    • Critical Final Readiness Review meeting Thursday https://t.co/h2nETtCp89

    https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/stat...69729664212994
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-May-18 at 05:11 PM.

  21. #141
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    SpaceX Crew-1 end of September

    Also, NASA goes for reuse out of the gate, and Starliner's still a dumpster fire...

    https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/statu...13196723343360

    Jeff Foust @jeff_foust
    McErlean: NASA’s plans call for reusing the Falcon 9 booster from the Crew-1 mission on the Crew-2 mission, and to reuse the Demo-2 capsule for Crew-2 as well.
    >
    Jeff Foust @jeff_foust
    McErlean: panel continues to be concerned about quality control problems that have seemingly plagued the Boeing commercial crew program.

  22. #142
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    It is an interesting thought exercise that flight proven hardware may be more reliable than new. It's certainly the way for the future.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  23. #143
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    Proof's in the pudding; Falcon 9 Block 5 has a 100% success rate, and Dragon has 20+ successful missions flying cargo. Falcon 9 Block 5 HR* and Crew Dragon build on those.

    Starliner is clearly a dumpster fire and not ready for prime time, and before the Starliner launch the heaviest payload Atlas V had launched was Cygnus at about 7,400 kg. Starliner masses 13,000+ kg.

    Now ULA is changing Atlas V's solid booster from the Aerojet-Rockeydyne AJ-60A to the new Northrop-Grumman GEM 63. Requalify the Atlas V HR* version? One would hope so.

    * Human Rated

  24. #144
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    Best wait until Vulcan flies...but by that time it is too late?
    I wish the Saturn IB had been kept around with Big Gemini instead of shuttle.
    That rocket would have allowed wider Hubble/KH ‘scopes.

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    I'd rather see Vulcan launch Crew Dream Chaser for 3 reasons,

    1) dissimilar redundancy
    2) low-G re-entries for delicate experiments (1.5 G)
    3) a big cross-range that can land at any airport

    Tell Boeing to cut bait.

  26. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    I'd rather see Vulcan launch Crew Dream Chaser for 3 reasons,

    1) dissimilar redundancy
    2) low-G re-entries for delicate experiments (1.5 G)
    3) a big cross-range that can land at any airport

    Tell Boeing to cut bait.
    They'd have to install multiple layers of bai-cutting management and then outsource the actual cutting.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    I'd rather see Vulcan launch Crew Dream Chaser for 3 reasons,

    1) dissimilar redundancy
    2) low-G re-entries for delicate experiments (1.5 G)
    3) a big cross-range that can land at any airport

    Tell Boeing to cut bait.
    I suspect with the money being thrown at SNC by NASA/DoD recently that is still on the cards as a contingency.

  28. #148
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    Crew 2, ASSEMBLE...

    Eric Berger @SciGuySpace
    "Early 2021" is the first semi-official launch date for the second operational SpaceX flight to the ISS, Crew-2.
    |
    ESA @esa
    ESA astronaut @thom_astro [Thomas Pesquet] is the first European to be assigned to fly on a @SpaceX #CrewDragon to the @Space_Station. He will fly on its second crewed operational flight, Crew-2, scheduled for launch in early 2021, with a mission name #Alpha https://esa.int/Science_Exploration/...ragon_to_space #USCV2
    |
    Dark Energy @Alejandro_DebH
    He will be joined by JAXA astronaut Akihiko Hoshide which will also command the ISS during their stay on the station
    |
    JAXA | @JAXA
    星出彰彦宇宙飛行士の国際宇宙ステーション(ISS)長期滞在 搭乗機決定について
    jaxa.jp

    https://twitter.com/Alejandro_DebH/s...01293655908352

  29. #149
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    SpaceX Crew-(n) will be the SpaceX operational missions.
    Starliner-(n) will be the Boeing operational missions.

    SpaceX Crew-1 launches a few weeks after Crew Dragon DM-2 returns, which is next week. Most likely SpaceX Crew-1 launches mid-September, and it'll be at ISS for ~210 days so a return about mid-April.

    With SpaceX Crew-2 launching in "early 2021" it's VERY possible there will be two Crew Dragons docked at ISS at the same time.

    That'll be one helluva photo-op for SpaceX.

    SpaceX Crew-2 has been filled out

    Commander: Shane Kimbrough (NASA)
    Pilot: Megan McArthur (NASA)
    Mission Specialist: Akihiko Hoshide (JAXA)*
    Mission Specialist: Thomas Pesquet (ESA)
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Jul-28 at 06:04 PM.

  30. #150
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    Commercial Crew notional dates:

    - SpaceX Crew 1 - NET 9/27/20
    - OFT-2 - 11/18/20 (Under review)
    - SpaceX Crew 2 - 3/30/21
    - CFT - 4/21
    - SpaceX Crew 3 - 8/12/21
    - SpaceX Crew 4 - 2/4/2
    - Boeing Crew 1 - 2/24/22
    - Boeing Crew 2 - 4/21/22
    - Boeing Crew 3 - 12/14/22

    Via NASA SMSR

    https://twitter.com/nextspaceflight/...79132676722689

    Also;

    About October, 2021 is Crew Dragon AX-1 (AXIOM-1, an AXIOM Space commercial mission). Likely the Universal Studios movie shoot with Tom Cruise, his director, likely a co-star and an AXIOM Space Commander. 10 day flight, 8 at the ISS. Could be between SpaceX Crew-3 and SpaceX Crew-4.

    There's also a Space Adventures Crew Dragon mission for a few days in orbit.
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Aug-06 at 04:36 PM.

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