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Thread: American human space capsule

  1. #181
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    The Orion spacecraft is now 15 years old and has flown into space just once.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2020...for-an-encore/
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  2. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    The Orion spacecraft is now 15 years old and has flown into space just once.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2020...for-an-encore/
    Read that article earlier today and the comment section swiftly pointed out that one flight wasn't even a complete Orion and some of the systems that were tested then have been modified since. I know Dragon only had one flight before carrying crew, but that was a fully functioning Dragon with all the systems installed and live. I mean I know it would have been expensive but they could have flown Orion to the ISS to fully check it out somewhere in the last few years, returning manned spaceflight capability to the US into the bargain.

  3. #183
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    Orion will fly "broken" in Nov 2021 test flight: NASA will fly deep-space crew capsule ‘as is,’ despite failed component.

    https://www.theverge.com/2020/12/18/...ilure-decision
    https://spacenews.com/nasa-to-skip-r...ctronics-unit/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Orion will fly "broken" in Nov 2021 test flight: NASA will fly deep-space crew capsule ‘as is,’ despite failed component.

    https://www.theverge.com/2020/12/18/...ilure-decision
    https://spacenews.com/nasa-to-skip-r...ctronics-unit/
    More in Space News.

    <speechless>

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-to-skip-r...ctronics-unit/

  5. #185
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    On one hand, it appears to have more than one level of redundancy and it is uncrewed, so even with a combination failure nobody will be hurt. On the other hand, it takes a YEAR to repair? I’d think you should be able to build and test a new one quicker than that, but I’d bet that takes forever too.

    I’d expect that if somebody had built a Dragon like this at SpaceX, they would be out of a job immediately.

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  6. #186
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    Okay so this not about a capsule but given the issues with Starliner its a worrying story about Boeing and its truly disastrous product:

    737 Max: Boeing 'inappropriately coached' pilots in test after crashes

  7. #187
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    Orion Spacecraft Training Simulator Arrives at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The simulator provides the ability for astronauts, engineers, and flight controllers to train and practice for scenarios during Artemis missions to the Moon. The interior of the simulator is being outfitted with Orion’s display and control system and crew seats to mimic what astronaut will experience during liftoff to the lunar vicinity and on their way back home to Earth.

    https://scitechdaily.com/orion-space...-space-center/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  8. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Orion Spacecraft Training Simulator Arrives at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The simulator provides the ability for astronauts, engineers, and flight controllers to train and practice for scenarios during Artemis missions to the Moon. The interior of the simulator is being outfitted with Orion’s display and control system and crew seats to mimic what astronaut will experience during liftoff to the lunar vicinity and on their way back home to Earth.

    https://scitechdaily.com/orion-space...-space-center/
    So for a realistic experience I assume it includes video of a fleet of starships flying past Orion enroute to the Moon?

  9. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    So for a realistic experience I assume it includes video of a fleet of starships flying past Orion enroute to the Moon?
    I hate to say that I was thinking much the same thing.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  10. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    Okay so this not about a capsule but given the issues with Starliner its a worrying story about Boeing and its truly disastrous product:

    737 Max: Boeing 'inappropriately coached' pilots in test after crashes
    Orion is a Lockheed Martin product, but given their F-35 and Freedom-class Littoral Combat Ship boondoggles....

  11. #191
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    Blue Origin didn’t wear the mask, so they contracted the same disease...

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  12. #192
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    Orion Ready to Fuel Up for Artemis I Mission. The Orion spacecraft for NASA’s Artemis I mission is taking one more step closer to its flight to the Moon. On Jan. 14, the spacecraft was lifted out of the stand in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida where engineers have meticulously outfitted it with thousands of components and tested its systems and subsystems to ensure it can accomplish its mission. With assembly complete, teams are moving it to its next facility for fueling and officially transferring the spacecraft to NASA’s Exploration Ground Systems (EGS) team responsible for processing Orion for its launch later this year. With this formal transfer of ownership from the Orion Program and lead contractor Lockheed Martin, the spacecraft will move from the manufacturing and assembly into the processing for flight. This transition is part of a series of time-sensitive operations, marking increasing confidence in the approaching 2021 launch date when the spacecraft will lift off atop the Space Launch System from Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/orion-r...emis-i-mission
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  13. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Orion Ready to Fuel Up for Artemis I Mission. The Orion spacecraft for NASA’s Artemis I mission is taking one more step closer to its flight to the Moon. On Jan. 14, the spacecraft was lifted out of the stand in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida where engineers have meticulously outfitted it with thousands of components and tested its systems and subsystems to ensure it can accomplish its mission. With assembly complete, teams are moving it to its next facility for fueling and officially transferring the spacecraft to NASA’s Exploration Ground Systems (EGS) team responsible for processing Orion for its launch later this year. With this formal transfer of ownership from the Orion Program and lead contractor Lockheed Martin, the spacecraft will move from the manufacturing and assembly into the processing for flight. This transition is part of a series of time-sensitive operations, marking increasing confidence in the approaching 2021 launch date when the spacecraft will lift off atop the Space Launch System from Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/orion-r...emis-i-mission
    So basically Lockheed Martin have palmed passed it off to NASA before anything else breaks?

  14. #194
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    STARLINER NEWS: Boeing’s Other Big Problem: Fixing Its Space Program. The company’s space ambitions, which have been dogged by errors and cost overruns, will soon face a major test.

    QUOTE: Boeing Co.’s engineering failures didn’t begin or end with the 737 MAX. Its once-dominant space program, which helped put Americans on the moon five decades ago, has also struggled. The company’s biggest space initiatives have been dogged by faulty designs, software errors and chronic cost overruns. It has lost out on recent contracts with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to return science experiments and astronauts to the moon, amid low rankings on price and technical merit. Boeing needs revenues from its defense and space arm, which makes everything from military jets to satellites, as a safety net as it navigates through the MAX crisis and slowed demand for new commercial jets in the pandemic. Its space ambitions will soon face a major test with another attempt to launch a capsule called the Starliner. In the first launch, just over a year ago without astronauts on board, a software error sent the Starliner into the wrong orbit, and then another threatened a catastrophic end to the mission. A successful launch, which could come as soon as March, would help restore the company’s reputation for reliability and engineering prowess.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/boeings...am-11610773201
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  15. #195
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    This is what happens when senior management views employees first, last, and only as an expense.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #196
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    What I really think of Boeing's management would get me banned.

    That said, what we call "Boeing" is actually McDonnell Douglas in drag. Boeing as a top-tier engineering company committed ritual suicide during 1997's merger.

  17. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    What I really think of Boeing's management would get me banned.

    That said, what we call "Boeing" is actually McDonnell Douglas in drag. Boeing as a top-tier engineering company committed ritual suicide during 1997's merger.
    I was there! But I don't blame Douglas, they suffered the same fate first. It was McDonnell, as influenced by GE's Jack Welch.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I was there! But I don't blame Douglas, they suffered the same fate first. It was McDonnell, as influenced by GE's Jack Welch.
    Agreed, and look what Neutron Jack's legacy has done to GE.

  19. #199
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    "Boeing making progress on Starliner software for test flight in March"

    https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/01/1...ight-in-march/

    Boeing said Monday it has re-qualified software for the company’s Starliner crew capsule after programming errors cut short the spacecraft’s first orbital test flight in 2019, and technicians at the Kennedy Space Center have connected the crew and service modules for the next unpiloted Starliner test flight to the International Space Station in March.
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  20. #200
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    Boeing Starliner completes software requalification. Boeing is not finished with testing the Starliner software. Additional work is planned with United Launch Alliance to test integration of Starliner with its Atlas 5 launch vehicle, and with NASA to test joint operations with the ISS. Boeing will also perform an end-to-end simulation of the upcoming second OFT mission, including complete testing of the software from prelaunch operations through docking, and from undocking to landing. Boeing acknowledged last year they didn’t do end-to-end software testing, instead breaking up the tests into smaller segments. That next OFT flight, known as OFT-2, is scheduled for March 29. Boeing agreed last year to perform the second uncrewed test flight at its own expense to complete the testing of the spacecraft, including docking with the ISS, before flying astronauts on the Crew Flight Test (CFT) later this year.

    https://spacenews.com/boeing-starlin...qualification/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  21. #201
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    "NASA and Boeing Target New Launch Date for Next Starliner Flight Test"

    https://starlinerupdates.com/nasa-an...flight-test-2/

    NASA and Boeing are targeting no earlier than Thursday, March 25, for the launch of Starliner’s second uncrewed flight test as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test-2 (OFT-2) is a critical developmental milestone on the company’s path to fly crew missions for NASA. Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner is designed, built, tested and flown by a team committed to safely, reliably and sustainably transporting astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

    The target launch date is enabled by an opening on the Eastern Range; the availability of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket; steady progress on hardware and software; and an International Space Station docking opportunity.

    The company recently mated the spacecraft’s reusable crew module atop its brand-new service module inside the Starliner production factory at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Teams are working to complete outfitting of the vehicle’s interior before loading cargo and conducting final spacecraft checkouts.

    Boeing also recently completed the formal requalification of Starliner’s OFT-2 flight software. Teams conducted a full software review and several series of tests to verify Starliner’s software meets design specifications. Boeing also will complete an end-to-end simulation of the OFT-2 test flight using flight hardware and final versions of Starliner’s flight software to model the vehicle’s expected behavior before flight.
    I am because we are
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  22. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    "NASA and Boeing Target New Launch Date for Next Starliner Flight Test"

    https://starlinerupdates.com/nasa-an...flight-test-2/
    Hoping Starliner doesn't crash into the ISS. It's not that I don't trust Boeing, but.... um...
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  23. #203
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    "NASA, Boeing test crew return and recovery procedures"

    https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/N...dures_999.html

    Landing and recovery teams from Boeing and NASA recently completed a crew landing dress rehearsal at the U.S. Army's White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, in preparation for missions returning with astronauts from the International Space Station as part of the agency's Commercial Crew Program.

    When astronauts land after their journey to the space station on Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, recovery teams must be able to remove the crew from the capsule quickly. In the unlikely event of a medical emergency, Boeing and NASA also partner with local trauma teams who are trained to provide the highest level of coordinated, specialized care.
    I am because we are
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  24. #204
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    NASA Invites Media to Prelaunch, Launch Activities for Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test-2. The launch on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is targeted for no earlier than March 25 from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

    https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/n...-flight-test-2
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  25. #205
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    Starliner test flight slips to early April. A second uncrewed test flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner commercial crew vehicle will be delayed by a little more than a week to replace hardware damaged during processing of the spacecraft.

    https://spacenews.com/starliner-test...o-early-april/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  26. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Starliner test flight slips to early April. A second uncrewed test flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner commercial crew vehicle will be delayed by a little more than a week to replace hardware damaged during processing of the spacecraft.

    https://spacenews.com/starliner-test...o-early-april/
    They connected the vehicle to a ground service equipment system which was misconfigured. There was a surge that blew out Starliner's avionics boxes, which now need replacing. I doubt the date will remain in early April, NASA ASAP and others will want more assurance other mistakes aren't undiscovered, and a safety review is still pending from before this incident.

  27. #207
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    Another delay. Widespread Texas power outages delay Boeing's second Starliner spacecraft test flight to April.

    https://www.space.com/boeing-starlin...-outages-delay
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  28. #208
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Starliner test flight slips to early April. A second uncrewed test flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner commercial crew vehicle will be delayed by a little more than a week to replace hardware damaged during processing of the spacecraft.

    https://spacenews.com/starliner-test...o-early-april/
    Are Boeing even trying now? Their entire business plan for Commercial Crew was to wait for SpaceX to fail, because obviously it just wasn't possible to build a capsule for the money SpaceX were given, then hit NASA up for a few billion extra. With that plan out of the window I doubt they are really interested in going forward on the current terms.

  29. #209
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    Washington Post reports on more Starliner follies...

    https://twitter.com/wapodavenport/st...63224581988354

    Christian Davenport ✓ @wapodavenport
    NASA says that the assessment of Boeing's safety culture, ordered in the wake of the flawed OFT-1 mission, has been postponed until after OFT-2 because of Covid. That’s a delay of more than a year. The agency says it will complete the review before Boeing’s crewed flight test. 1/
    ||
    From the statement: “The goal of the OSA is to provide a comprehensive safety assessment through individual employee interviews with a sampling from a cross-section of personnel, including senior managers, mid-level management and supervision, and engineers and technicians...” 2/
    ||
    “NASA currently is working to determine the best approach for conducting the employee interviews given COVID-19 restrictions to ensure we are moving forward as safely as possible while still gathering the data we need for the assessment.” 3/
    ||
    “NASA continues to maintain insight into Boeing’s compliance with the agency's safety requirements and processes through normal work activities.” 4/

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