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Thread: Biologically productive hectare (or lands)?

  1. #1
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    Biologically productive hectare (or lands)?

    Some people (the people who put up "the Global Hectare" idea) arbitrarily consider "biologically productive lands to be cropland, fishing grounds, and forests (it sounds like they forget grassland), and desert, tundra, and open ocean are excluded.
    Would you call this arbitrary or "land discrimination"?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inclusa View Post
    Some people (the people who put up "the Global Hectare" idea) arbitrarily consider "biologically productive lands to be cropland, fishing grounds, and forests (it sounds like they forget grassland), and desert, tundra, and open ocean are excluded.
    Would you call this arbitrary or "land discrimination"?
    I think they probably mean "areas where biology creates production for humans," and so it's not arbitrary.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inclusa View Post
    Some people (the people who put up "the Global Hectare" idea) arbitrarily consider "biologically productive lands to be cropland, fishing grounds, and forests (it sounds like they forget grassland), and desert, tundra, and open ocean are excluded.
    Would you call this arbitrary or "land discrimination"?
    I have no idea what the Global Hectare idea is or what you are talking about. Could you explain?

    And what does "biologically productive" mean? Does that mean productive for humans, or just productive for biology? Just about any land on Earth, other than newly cooled lava, has some biological activity.
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  4. #4
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    http://www.footprintnetwork.org/en/i...#globalhectare

    Here is an official definition of Global Hectare:

    global hectare (gha) : Global hectares are the accounting unit for the Ecological Footprint and biocapacity accounts. These productivity weighted biologically productive hectares allow researchers to report both the biocapacity of the earth or a region and the demand on biocapacity (the Ecological Footprint). A global hectare is a biologically productive hectare with world average biological productivity for a given year. Global hecares are needed because different land types have different productivities. A global hectare of, for example, cropland, would occupy a smaller physical area than the much less biologically productive pasture land, as more pasture would be needed to provide the same biocapacity as one hectare of cropland. Because world productivity varies slightly from year to year, the value of a global hectare may change slightly from year to year.

    http://www.greenfacts.org/glossary/abc/biocapacity.htm

    Biocapacity refers to the capacity of a given biologically productive area to generate an on-going supply of renewable resources and to absorb its spillover wastes.

    Unsustainability occurs if the area’s ecological footprint exceeds its biocapacity.

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    Inclusa, I think you're picking up on a minor niche definition used by a small in-group. "Global hectare" is hardly a common terminology or one that, IMO, seems likely to become common in ecological circles.


    So yeah, in the example you give, it seems pretty arbitrary.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Inclusa, I think you're picking up on a minor niche definition used by a small in-group. "Global hectare" is hardly a common terminology or one that, IMO, seems likely to become common in ecological circles.


    So yeah, in the example you give, it seems pretty arbitrary.
    Should I say, it is quite anthropocentric to talk about biocapacity this way?
    Ecosystems often works better without human interference anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Inclusa View Post
    Should I say, it is quite anthropocentric to talk about biocapacity this way?
    Yes, it is.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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