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Thread: About foreigners (relative to the locality) wearing ethnic fashions (or costumes)

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    About foreigners (relative to the locality) wearing ethnic fashions (or costumes)

    Many foreigners wear the ethnic fashions (or costumes) in certain countries to respect the local culture (or other points).
    Still, Caucasians in hanfu may feel "weird" to the very least (but if you are used to Star Wars, it will not be that shocking.)
    What do you think? I'm aware of the whole cosplay thing, though.

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    As a life long foreigner (to other people, anyway), I'd feel most embarrassed to behave as if I'm off to a fancy dress party.
    Social mores, yes. Take your shoes off at the door. Cover your head if required. Etc.
    But sombreros in Latin countries, fez in the Middle East, Bowler hats in the UK! So marks you out as a tourist, not a traveller.

    Hanfu is the traditional dress of Chinese Han people, according to the Wiki.
    You on holiday in China, Inclusa?

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnD View Post
    Hanfu is the traditional dress of Chinese Han people, according to the Wiki.
    You on holiday in China, Inclusa?
    I could be remembering wrong, but I think that Inclusa is from China originally.
    As above, so below

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    I would say that foreigners wearing ethnic clothes that local people don't wear is weird. But wearing what other people wear seems fine. So a foreigner going to work in Japan wearing a ninja outfit would be odd. But going to a summer festival and wearing a kimono seems fine, because others wear them as well.
    As above, so below

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    Scots view foreigners who adopt the kilt with a sort of benign amusement, in general.
    We don't mind you adopting our traditional garb - we just wonder why you'd bother.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Kilt views now complicated but they were reinvented in the Victorian era, mine from my mother's side is the colourful Buchanon, but from my English father side is obviously trousers, as we say for pants for any US readers. At school I had to sport the straw hat we called a boater as was popular in USA in the 1920s or thereabouts but now would be viewed as fancy dress, its a pity, the boater is a nice hat and keeping it on while cycling is an important skill now lost I fear. The wind can be a hazard in a kilt too, for there's nothing under.
    sicut vis videre esto
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Kilt views now complicated but they were reinvented in the Victorian era ...
    I think Scots would be even more amused and baffled if a foreigner turned up sporting the original 15ft feileadh mor.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    The wind can be a hazard in a kilt too, for there's nothing under.
    I guess there is "something" under. Otherwise, why would you worry about the wind?
    As above, so below

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    Hey, when I saw the title of the thread, I thought it was going to be about Mark Zuckerberg's Diwali facebook post yesterday, with a picture of him and Priscilla in wedding garb a couple years ago:
    http://www.gdnonline.com/Details/33445

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    I have enough trouble with the fashion mores of my own culture!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Scots view foreigners who adopt the kilt with a sort of benign amusement, in general.
    I once came across a Belgian wedding party who had been to Gretna Green and were in Dumfries for the reception where the twenty or so men were all in kilts, to the amusement of all.

    We don't mind you adopting our traditional garb - we just wonder why you'd bother.
    I would suggest you have never worn the kilt among women who aren't used to it.

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    Grant,
    Google is our friend, but you may have to explain "feileadh mor".

    And may I ask why, until the middle of the 19th century, did rural Scots wrap themselves in a giant blanket, with a tailored shirt beneath, when the rest of Britain wore tunics, long or short, like giant T-shirts but in wool like the féileadh, as early as the Medieval?
    Good sense for the climate? Although Wales is notoriously a rainy place, and they wore the tunic by then, with a square cloak against the downpour.

    John
    PS My daughter is married to a Scot, and for her wedding, his family kindly asked if I wished to wear the kilt, as their men without exception did.
    I respectfully declined, partly for the reasons given above, but also, like Heid the Ba', because I doubted if I could carry it off with sufficient nonchalance.
    And would have tripped myself up with the dirk.
    I hope and don't think I gave offence, and we have now been made honorary Scots for the vigour of our dancing at the feast! So honour on both sides, as there should be for a wedding! J.
    Last edited by JohnD; 2015-Nov-11 at 11:07 PM.

  14. 2015-Nov-11, 11:15 PM

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    Thumbs down

    Being White in the USA...nah, I ain't touching this subject.
    Dip me in ink and toss me to the Poets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnD View Post
    Grant,
    Google is our friend, but you may have to explain "feileadh mor".
    The "great kilt", which was a long strip of cloth, straight off the loom, wrapped around the body and belted at the waist. To be contrasted with the feileadh beag, the "little kilt" which is the modern tailored garment that hangs from the waist to the knee.

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnD View Post
    And may I ask why, until the middle of the 19th century, did rural Scots wrap themselves in a giant blanket ...
    Because at night they slept in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnD View Post
    My daughter is married to a Scot, and for her wedding, his family kindly asked if I wished to wear the kilt, as their men without exception did.
    I respectfully declined, partly for the reasons given above, but also, like Heid the Ba', because I doubted if I could carry it off with sufficient nonchalance.
    I think Heid the Ba' was suggesting that the ladies tend to become aflutter in the presence of a kilt, if they're not used to it. Like you, I think that only works if the man can wear it with aplomb - there are many comic misadventures to be had with a kilt and sporran, from being fitted badly, to sitting carelessly, to gonadal injury when ascending stairs hurriedly / dancing vigorously. I've observed that the ladies have a keen sense of humour when observing a man struggling with an unfamiliar and potentially revealing garment.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I could be remembering wrong, but I think that Inclusa is from China originally.
    Jens, close, but I was born in Hong Kong when Hong Kong was still a British Dependent Territory.
    The proper time to wear hanfu in China would be festivals at special places.

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    Speaking of kilts, I saw a handful being worn at the Oktoberfest held in Leavenworth, Washington last month. Some were more or less traditional but others were of a decidedly modern style that is apparently catching on in some hipster circles. I, of course, was wearing traditional Trachten.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Speaking of kilts, I saw a handful being worn at the Oktoberfest held in Leavenworth, Washington last month. Some were more or less traditional but others were of a decidedly modern style that is apparently catching on in some hipster circles. I, of course, was wearing traditional Trachten.
    Pardon my ignorance, but why are KILTS being worn at a (supposedly) German-themed event?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Pardon my ignorance, but why are KILTS being worn at a (supposedly) German-themed event?
    Easier access to sausages?

    Sorry. At any rate, Oktoberfest is a fun time for traditional clothing of all kinds to get taken out, dusted off and partied in. Wearing something different makes you stand out, which is part of the fun.

    Speaking for myself, I love to wear a kilt whenever possible. I have the family and military history to be able to wear the tartan, it feels good to wear, looks great and has a ton of style. I never hear any taunts about 'dresses' etc., mainly because a guy standing 6'4" and wearing parachute wings rarely gets taunted.
    "The difference between theory and practice is that in theory, there's no difference."

    "Aikido: the art of hitting people with planets."

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    The whole idea of traditional "national" or "folk" costume is a late 19th century construct. It sometimes has a basis in workwear for men, eg lederhosen, decorated for high days, but was, I think, ever prey to fashions as they swept across continents.
    Look at the "traditional" European man's suit jacket, a riding jacket that originally had a stand up collar and buttoning cuffs, to keep out the rain, now evolved into useless lapels and even more vestigial buttons on the cuff.
    The jacket has lost its 'tails' that originally protected the upper thighs of the rider, but again vestigially hung on in the tailcoat jacket of formal wear for many years.

    The Bowler hat, so beloved of stereotypers as 'traditional' English wear, was originally a riding hat, in fact a primitive crash helmet in alternative to the soft cap or before that the soft, tricorne hat. It became a fashion for 'smart' city dwellers, mostly Londoners, when the rest of the country wore soft flat caps, or later, Trilbys, and was never "English" wear, let alone "British", any more than chaps and a ten gallon hat were "American".

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think Heid the Ba' was suggesting that the ladies tend to become aflutter in the presence of a kilt, if they're not used to it.
    Indeed, though as Grant says you have to have the confidence and swagger to pull it off. Back when the world was young and I was still known as Bawheid my picture in the BABB photo album was of me at a wedding dancing with two traditionally built West Indian ladies who were much taken with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    So a foreigner going to work in Japan wearing a ninja outfit would be odd.
    Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnD View Post
    The whole idea of traditional "national" or "folk" costume is a late 19th century construct.
    Before that they were just called "clothes".
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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    As an american, I am horribly disgusted whenever I see a Canadian dressed in American clothes!
    (sarcasm)


    I guess because New York is so diverse, I don't really mind for what other people wear.
    "The only one who knows this ounce of words is just a token, is he who has a tongue to tell that must remain unspoken"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Being White in the USA...nah, I ain't touching this subject.
    There are people in any country who get bent out of shape when tourists or refugees from somewhere else step into their neighborhood. It's not just white Americans who get bent out of shape over that kind of thing.
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mareykan View Post
    As an american, I am horribly disgusted whenever I see a Canadian dressed in American clothes!
    (sarcasm)


    I guess because New York is so diverse, I don't really mind for what other people wear.
    What is special about American clothes, then?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Inclusa View Post
    What is special about American clothes, then?
    If you're talking about the reference to Canadians, it was obviously a joke.
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Inclusa View Post
    What is special about American clothes, then?
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/a...arel-bankrupt/

    John

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    Ok, American Apparel is a brand name, and it is known for questionable advertising posters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkepticJ View Post
    Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.
    Yeah, I tried that. HR sent me home when I came in wearing a thong for the male escort job I really want to be doing.

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