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Thread: Does anyone still write letters?

  1. #1
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    Does anyone still write letters?

    Does anyone still write letters? I know that the answer will be yes; so why do I ask? Well curiousity for one think. Do you do it because it out of necessity, or is it a pleasure? Do people still have pen-pals, (actual pen-pals)? I may have written 2 letters in the last 10 years. Greeting cards are a separate thing. I remember pen-pals were sort of encouraged when I was in school in the '70's.
    Last edited by banquo's_bumble_puppy; 2015-Nov-07 at 12:36 PM.

  2. #2
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    Lastly, do you use actual pen on paper?

  3. #3
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    Employers still want cover letters.

    I've never been much for letter writing. I can never get beyond the cultural norms of taciturnity and avoidance of self-revelation to be good at it.
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  4. #4
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    I write letters quite often. At work. For my boss to sign. Typed on a computer, of course. On an 8 1/2 x 11" template with letterhead. The letter is then printed out and signed. With a pen. Then scanned to pdf format and attached to a brief email ("Please see attached letter..."). Thus, delivery is nearly instantaneous. Sometimes the original is also sent through regular mail, which will show up a couple days later.
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  5. #5
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    I wrote letters to my brother P. during his first six weeks of training at West Point when he wasn't allowed to call. I enjoyed it a lot. I'd like to write letters more, but I don't know if I'd have time this semester. Maybe if I had an interesting pen pal in another country.

  6. #6
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    Only business letters, and those not often.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #7
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    No. Only because I figure if friends/family can't hardly be bothered to stay in touch online, via various instant and "always open" social media...

    Holiday cards are an exception.

    I do miss using pretty stationery (prior to Digital Revolution and when very young). Hallmark had really nice boxed stationery sets back in the day; maybe still do.

  8. #8
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    My sister has never been interested in getting a computer so I type letters on my computer, print them, and mail them. She hand writes hers.

  9. #9
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    Up until about ten years ago, I used to print out letters to send to my mom and dad, because they didn't do computers.

    Dad's gone now, and Mom doesn't even read any more (though I do telephone her whenever I can).

  10. #10
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    Nov. 7, 2015.

    Dear Mr. Banuo.

    Yes, the practice of letter writing has not been abandoned totally. Sometimes a polite and formal reply is the best way to repond. We certainly enjoy your communications here on CQ/UT and urge you not to give them up. Consider them as informal 'letters'.

    Best Regards, John M.
    Last edited by John Mendenhall; 2015-Nov-08 at 03:47 AM. Reason: date and typo

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Mendenhall View Post
    ...
    Last edited by John Mendenhall; Today at 10:47 PM. Reason: date and typo
    Hey! You can't edit a written letter with your word processor! You have to scratch things out and squeeze in the corrections! Or tear it up and start over!

  12. #12
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    The last regular letters I wrote were to my Mom during my deployments in the Bosnian War; largely because soldiers are supposed to write letters home. Not much in them... "Dear Mom. Still raining. Food still sucks. Didn't get shot at..." at least until that last one changed rather rapidly and letter-writing got pushed to the back of the 'importance' line.

    Into the 2000's, I used to write 'Thank You' letters to visiting Senseis coming to teach at our Aikido dojo. Terrible handwriting; but I could make a rather acceptable script with a nice fountain pen. That too has changed; nowadays it's more "Yeah, thanks! Here's your money, let's buy you dinner and get ya back to the airport..."

    We certainly may have lost something in the disappearance of hand-written letters, but in my case the main thing I can say I've lost is the recurring hand-cramps.
    "The difference between theory and practice is that in theory, there's no difference."

    "Aikido: the art of hitting people with planets."

  13. #13
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    I stopped trying to write in cursive script the day of my high school graduation. From that point forward, I printed everything but my signature. Except for my three initials, I couldn't tell you how to write any other capital letters in script.

    During my spell as a school teacher, my signature went all to Hell when I had to sign dozens of documents, reports, passes and detention notices every wretched day. I reduced it to mostly squiggles to save time and energy.

    Today, I get a hand-cramp after printing a few characters when I have to. I can blame arthritis, but it's mostly laziness.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    I write letters quite often. At work. For my boss to sign. Typed on a computer, of course. On an 8 1/2 x 11" template with letterhead. The letter is then printed out and signed. With a pen. Then scanned to pdf format and attached to a brief email ("Please see attached letter..."). Thus, delivery is nearly instantaneous. Sometimes the original is also sent through regular mail, which will show up a couple days later.
    And each one chargeable . . . Other than emailing them that is my day, I usually have hard copy enclosures.

  15. #15
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    I correspond with a number of people who share and prefer a letter. Yes, they are written in long hand. Some use a fountain pen like myself.
    Greeting cards are always in cursive . My wife and I are taking great delight in teaching cursive writing to our children when they ask, and they seem keen to write at the drop of a hat.
    It remains a skill one subscribes to ........or not.

    Best regards,
    Dan

  16. #16
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    I used to keep a fountain pen (well, the kind with replaceable ink cartridges) for times when I had to write something out. They're far less tiring to use then ballpoints. So long as they don't leak.

  17. #17
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    I use pencil and paper a lot to write poetry. I like to mail it others. I really like to open an envelope and read something from someone, feeling that more thought and time consumption went into the letter. My ex and I stay in touch through mail. She refuses to own a computer. Her career was in clinical psychology and it is her opinion that the world needs to unplug. She grew tired of seeing entire families going out to dinner with everyone texting and communicating with someone other than who is sitting at the table.

    In my astronomy club we have had more problems at our observing sites since the snail mail method was replaced with electronic communication. With the snail mail method all permits had several signatures on them and carbon copies were given to the police, rangers and astronomers so that something was right in everyone's hands and posted at sites. It ran like a clock. Since the conservation district switched to electronic mail things are a mess. The police have evicted us a few times after we drove for several hours to get to the site since they never got a copy. At several public outreaches the gates were not left open because the ranger was not informed and we were not aware of it. Therefore, the public was locked out. After several failed attempts we decided to put up with their electronic mess while making printed hard copies of our permits to carry with us out to the sites. Put it on paper in front of a cop and he listens.

  18. #18
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    Sure! I just wrote 11 of them on the back of my Debit card at the bank. 12 if you count a space as a letter.


  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Sure! I just wrote 11 of them on the back of my Debit card at the bank. 12 if you count a space as a letter.

    Sure, the space counts. At least in computers and personal license plates. Let me see, I'd guess the first six were D-A-V-E-space-C. Or maybe D-A-V-I-D-space....
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  20. #20
    I stop writing letter using pen and paper 15 years ago since my closest relative died unless, someone in my family need my authorisation letter when I can't manage to process important documents.

  21. #21
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    Business letters or personal?

    I just received an email from a business I know, but from someone therein who I don't. It enclosed an encrypted message.
    I had to tell them that there was no way I was opening an unsolicited email with encrypted content, and that if they had confidential information for me, the postal service was reliable and secure, if a little slower.

    John

  22. #22
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    And how about a thank you card or greeting in your own hand? I think the case has to be made for formal correspondence in season.
    Just a thought.

    Dan

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