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Thread: Middle-aged kit building

  1. #691
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I hope you enjoyed your research. If otherwise, I apologize for not identifying the subject aircraft.
    It is indeed, going to be "Boojum", one of two Walruses carried by the S.S. Balaena during the 1946-47 southern whaling season.

    Getting the wings on these aircraft is a little tricky without four hands. So I'm squaring away the upper wing, which had essentially no dihedral, and then will add the upper surface of the lower wings, using the three interplane struts on each side to support those parts in position while another round of epoxy dries. I've already threaded and secured the various bracing wires (in the form of nylon monofilament) through the lower surface of the upper wing, before assembly. They're all gathered together and held out of the way with yellow masking tape at present. Once I have the upper surface of the lower wing in position and secured, I'll thread the rigging through predrilled holes in that surface, tighten, and secure with cyanoacrylate. Then I'll add the lower surface of the lower wing, which already has the wing floats and associated rigging in place.
    So eventually all the attachment points for rigging should be concealed inside the assembled wings, which thankfully have a deep enough chord to easily accommodate several blobs of CA in their hollow interior.

    That's how the theory goes, anyway. The trick is going to be avoiding skewing the wing assemblies by overtightening the rigging.

    Grant Hutchison
    Don't worry I had great fun chasing it down. For most of my bike ride this morning I was turning over Flying Boats in my mind trying to think of what it could be. The cunning trick of the missing lower wing just made the 'final victory' all the more sweet. I am almost disappointed that it had no connection with the Norwegian aviatrix - I know that is a dated term but I love the sound of it. I did see a photo of the S.S. Balaena in my research. Looking further now I see that there is a lot of information about this vessel and its southern voyage including more photos of the plane. I did like the title of the associated book "Air Whaler by John Grierson (Flight Commodore of the Whaling Factory ship Balaena)". Grierson himself seems to have had a pretty exciting life.

    Once again I am impressed by your patience and dexterity in making these models.

  2. #692
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Don't worry I had great fun chasing it down. For most of my bike ride this morning I was turning over Flying Boats in my mind trying to think of what it could be. The cunning trick of the missing lower wing just made the 'final victory' all the more sweet. I am almost disappointed that it had no connection with the Norwegian aviatrix - I know that is a dated term but I love the sound of it. I did see a photo of the S.S. Balaena in my research. Looking further now I see that there is a lot of information about this vessel and its southern voyage including more photos of the plane. I did like the title of the associated book "Air Whaler by John Grierson (Flight Commodore of the Whaling Factory ship Balaena)". Grierson himself seems to have had a pretty exciting life.
    Air Whaler is currently on its way to me, but has been for about six weeks so far. I absent-mindedly ordered it from a US bookstore, and it has entered the now-familiar USPS limbo--according to the tracking information it has been about to leave the USA for five weeks.

    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Once again I am impressed by your patience and dexterity in making these models.
    Thanks.
    Patience, yes. But you wouldn't have used the word "dexterity" if you'd seen my efforts with one of the lower wings this morning. I dropped it, twice in succession, into the little puddle of epoxy I had prepared and was about to apply to the locating slot in the fuselage. Fortunately the epoxy is water-soluble, and I got it all off before it messed with the acrylic paint too much. I'm actually ambisinistrous.

    Grant Hutchison
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  3. #693
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Air Whaler is currently on its way to me, but has been for about six weeks so far. I absent-mindedly ordered it from a US bookstore, and it has entered the now-familiar USPS limbo--according to the tracking information it has been about to leave the USA for five weeks.

    Thanks.
    Patience, yes. But you wouldn't have used the word "dexterity" if you'd seen my efforts with one of the lower wings this morning. I dropped it, twice in succession, into the little puddle of epoxy I had prepared and was about to apply to the locating slot in the fuselage. Fortunately the epoxy is water-soluble, and I got it all off before it messed with the acrylic paint too much. I'm actually ambisinistrous.

    Grant Hutchison
    Thanks for the 'Readers Digest' word of the day. I now know what to call myself in discussion. My few attempts at assembling models in my youth resulted in glue blobs everywhere, misaligned joins and decals either upside down or torn. They only things that seemed to be properly glued together were my fingers. I will continue to watch you, and the other modellers on this site, with envy and appreciation of the skill and patience involved.

  4. #694
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'm actually ambisinistrous.
    Hah! That made me laugh. Two left hands. Iíd guess itís mildly discouraged these days because of the association of sinister and left. My father was ambidextrous because he was naturally left handed and (in what strikes me as bizarre, especially in the US) there was still a stigma to that when he was young so he was taught to write right handed, and he was good at it. It didnít stop him from writing with his left too, though.

    I often say Iím ambimoustrous and that is actually a word in use, if rarely. Iím naturally right handed, but I often will use my left hand for fine tasks without thinking. Canít write left handed though.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

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  5. #695
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Mendenhall View Post
    Beautiful ship!
    Thank you. It's a quality kit.

  6. #696
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Patience, yes. But you wouldn't have used the word "dexterity" if you'd seen my efforts with one of the lower wings this morning. I dropped it, twice in succession, into the little puddle of epoxy I had prepared and was about to apply to the locating slot in the fuselage. Fortunately the epoxy is water-soluble, and I got it all off before it messed with the acrylic paint too much. I'm actually ambisinistrous.

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes, a word to remember. I've gotten that way in my later years as well. Earlier in my career as an instrument technician, I could manipulate small things with dexterity. Not any more.

    I look forward to the completed Boojum.

  7. #697
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    Here she is:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I built a magnetic stand for her. I see I've knocked her a little off-centre on the stand while taking the photos, but it's actually a nice snug fit, and of course it means the underside is left intact.

    Grant Hutchison
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  8. #698
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    Very nice
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  9. #699
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    Outstanding, Grant. Simply outstanding.

  10. #700
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    It has come out very well!

  11. #701
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    What a lovely model of a very lovely plane. I wonder if sea planes will make a comeback if we eschew fossil fuels?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  12. #702
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    Thanks all. Quite a few customizations to convert an old generic kit to the appearance of the real thing. The trickiest part was adding the grab rail around the nose, which I manufactured from 0.5mm brass rod.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Grant Hutchison
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  13. #703
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Thanks all. Quite a few customizations to convert an old generic kit to the appearance of the real thing. The trickiest part was adding the grab rail around the nose, which I manufactured from 0.5mm brass rod.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Grant Hutchison
    Brass rod? And all those attachment points for the rail in brass too? Stunning!

  14. #704
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Brass rod? And all those attachment points for the rail in brass too? Stunning!
    Thanks.
    Yes, all individually drilled and cut to length.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Grant Hutchison
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  15. #705
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Thanks.
    Yes, all individually drilled and cut to length.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Grant Hutchison
    With the rail soldered to them? Or just adhesive? In either case, the whole project is simply jaw-dropping. Except for the white part of the stand, which bugs me a little bit.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #706
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    With the rail soldered to them? Or just adhesive? In either case, the whole project is simply jaw-dropping. Except for the white part of the stand, which bugs me a little bit.
    Too close to the styrene for a soldering iron, so cyanoacrylate glue.
    Yes, the white stand is annoying. It's made of styrene card with a neodymium magnet epoxied inside. I fiddled around for a while trying to produce something transparent, but it just looked a mess; and I considered spraying the whole stand white, which I may yet do.

    Grant Hutchison
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  17. #707
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    Work on La Pinta has slowed to a crawl. I have made some progress, just not enough worthy of an update post. But what I have done is build the future display case for the ship. I may have mentioned that the model collects a lot of dust and cat hair, so a case is necessary. Unfortunately, because this is a model of a sailing ship which has masts, yards and such, the volume require to completely contain it is non-trivial. The case (inside) is about 25 cm x 430 x 500 cm. Not sure where I'm going to put it when the project is complete. Anyway, here's a photo of the case. Alder wood with thick acrylic panes on each side held in with figure 8 fasteners, which are not aesthetically ideal.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  18. #708
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    Today was my first adventure out of the house after being horribly sick for weeks.

    A few years ago, I got my son a game called X-Wing. Today, at a hobby shop I saw a copy for $40.00 and wanted to buy him a replacement set. My wife said, "No, he won't appreciate that because he was 15 when he got it and now he is 19." Fair enough observation.

    While walking through the clearance section, I noticed a foam cutter for $5.00. My wife said I could have it. Oh, did she bite off more than she could chew. Over the next half hour or so, I ran through the store tossing things into the cart. My wife thought I went nuts and perhaps I did.

    After loading the cart with about $70 dollars worth of random stuff (photo paper, foam core board, paint, etc.) I circled back to the X-Wing game and dropped it in the cart. My wife didn't quite explode, but she forcefully explained, again why we weren't buying the Star Wars X-Wing Game.

    I explained that I was going to replace Paul's X-Wing game with a handmade one, twice as big. Box, models, dice, game pieces, etc. Here is an image of the original T.I.E. Fighter in an unknown scale and a 1:144 scale T.I.E. Fighter.



    Not counting the game, the whole mess of stuff cost $60 bucks. Now for the brilliant part. I can't reproduce the rule set or the box cover exactly because each is bigger than my printer's largest paper size. But not bigger than the scanner. I'm going to do the exterior of the scaled up box as a collage from multiple prints of the exterior of the box. It will have my son's name on it because the title is small enough to print on my printer. I can't scale up the rules booklet so that will have to remain small.

    Crazy?

    My wife then pointed out my daughter wants a Millennium Falcon. Guess what's going to happen next?
    Solfe

  19. #709
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    Here is step two to the super sized game set, the X-Wings.



    I figured out a trick to building this one. The last time I posted about X-Wings, I mentioned how marvelously keyed each part was for 1:144 scale model. It's virtually impossible to assemble a part wrong. However, the last time I found a way to mess up the wings.

    Being an X-Wing, the wings form an X that is clasped between the upper and lower hull. Instead of being two lefts together or two tops together, it's top left to right bottom and the reverse for the second wing. It's a scissoring part. There is a post that holds them together and that post is cradled by the hull halves. Obviously, if you glue this part the wings don't move.

    Also, the wings are nearly symmetrical as are the hull haves. Visually, you can't tell which way is up for the wings. However, in my last build of this model, I noticed that the hull has a small fin near the part that cradles the wings and the wings have a similar fin. The fins meet and form a 90 degree angle when you misassemble this part. If you flip the wing assembly over, they don't touch at all. Oops.

    In the last build, this is where I went wrong. Either I applied too much glue and gummed up the wing hinge or I tried to glue the two fins together and they melted into place, but pushed the wings crooked.

    Along the front of the hull halves, there three pegs and holes hold the ship front together. Those pegs stop just in front of the cradled wings. At the back of the hull, a hexagonal piece clips the hull halves together with four posts. The hexagon has a small recess to cradle the back of the wing's hinge. That's 9 points of contact, so I didn't glue any of these pieces. It's weird, but works. I've tried it 4 times now.

    The Advanced T.I.E.s are a super easy build.

    On the off chance I do this for my two boys, my daughter and myself, I will need 8 T.I.E.s, 4 X-Wings, the Flacon, an Advanced T.I.E and one or two A-Wings.



    Each X-Wing takes about 45 minutes to assemble, while the T.I.E.s take about 20 minutes each.
    Solfe

  20. #710
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    Well I didn't know I needed these Apollo Command Module replica switches - but I think I do. Especially when they release a version that will work on a standard electrical wall receptacle.

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/14...g?v=1620046233

  21. #711
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Well I didn't know I needed these Apollo Command Module replica switches - but I think I do. Especially when they release a version that will work on a standard electrical wall receptacle.

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/14...g?v=1620046233
    I'm getting a "known dangerous website" alert from your first link.

    Grant Hutchison
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  22. #712
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'm getting a "known dangerous website" alert from your first link.

    Grant Hutchison
    Hmmm...I don't know Grant. Here's just the website URL without embedding in the post text (and it works OK for me in Chrome, no warnings):

    https://www.concordaerospace.com/

  23. #713
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Hmmm...I don't know Grant. Here's just the website URL without embedding in the post text (and it works OK for me in Chrome, no warnings):

    https://www.concordaerospace.com/
    Nope. Norton really does not like Concorde Aerospace at present. It's an automated check on the website behaviour before it loads, and of course it can flag false positives.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Oct-15 at 04:15 PM.
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  24. #714
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Nope. Norton really does not like Concorde Aerospace at present. It's an automated check on the website behaviour before it loads, and of course it can flag false positives.

    Grant Hutchison

    Grant Hutchison
    It seems like a legitimate site and company; Concorde makes aircraft simulator hardware for serious hobbyists. Here are a few videos of the switches:

    Chemtrail Activation Switch
    https://youtu.be/J0DDNFDyPv4

    COVID19 Microchip Implant Activation Switch
    https://youtu.be/mxsWLtmmfkc

    There are other videos out there but you get the gist.

  25. #715
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    Sitechecker has it blacklisted, using Google Safe Browsing data.
    But Google Safe Browsing currently gives it a clean bill of health, albeit dating from ten days ago.

    Grant Hutchison
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  26. #716
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    Oh now that's funny. I ran the website through Sitechecker and it came back as you said. With an imbedded ad for Concord Aerospace.

  27. #717
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  28. #718
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    Very nice. I knew it was one of the experimental lifting bodies, but I didn’t remember which one, so looked it up:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northrop_HL-10

    I was partial to the X-24B, the last rocket powered Air Force & NASA test plane, and lessons learned applied to the space shuttle:

    https://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Vi.../martin-x-24b/

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

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  29. #719
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    Yes, the HL-10. Fantastic Plastic are slowly releasing a series of 1:48 resin kits of experimental lifting bodies. So far the HL-10 and M2-F3 are available, with the X-24A and X-24B promised.
    Resin kits are usually hard work, but this one was a positive assault course, and very nearly ended up in the bin a few times. I managed to overcome most of the problems, but it's definitely sitting unrealistically high on its undercarriage, and I'm undermotivated to start trying to fix that at present.
    I was also experimenting with Alclad metallic lacquer, which many people seem to manage to use unsealed, but not me. Just the little bit of careful handling to apply the decals resulted in a few areas of wear to the metallic surface, and an overall dulling of the finish. On the plus side, I did manage to conceal the massive seams between the upper and lower halves, and around the lateral fins.

    Grant Hutchison
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  30. #720
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    Nice work, and an interesting subject.

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