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Thread: AstroSat - India's 1st astronomy satellite

  1. #1
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    AstroSat - India's 1st astronomy satellite

    India plans to have a satellite dedicated to astronomy studies.

    http://indianspacestation.com/resear...stronomy-study

    Talking on the topic 'Future Technological and Science Challenges in Space Exploration,' Kumar said that it is the first satellite of its kind in the world that would be able to monitor simultaneous multi-wavelengths of intensity variations including visible, X-ray and UV bands in a broad range of cosmic sources. The satellite is scheduled to be launched soon with PSLV in near-equatorial orbit.

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    What, a spacecraft orbiting Mars doesn't count as astronomy?

    https://www.facebook.com/isromom

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    Quote Originally Posted by StupendousMan View Post
    What, a spacecraft orbiting Mars doesn't count as astronomy?

    https://www.facebook.com/isromom
    MOM is the Mars mission, but AstroSat is the astronomy mission.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    Got it. Studying Mars doesn't count as astronomy.

    Yeah, yeah, I know what you are trying to say: the AstroSat will observe many different objects in the sky, instead of just one. Fine, fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by StupendousMan View Post
    Got it. Studying Mars doesn't count as astronomy.

    Yeah, yeah, I know what you are trying to say: the AstroSat will observe many different objects in the sky, instead of just one. Fine, fine.
    My first glance of the article in the OP made me think that these two operations were together, but they are separate missions with separate launches (MOM was 2014; AstroSat 2015), orbiting separate planets.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    ASTROSAT is fully assembled and tests initiated. The article has a picture of the satellite. It will be launched by a PSLV C-34 in the 2nd half of this year.

    http://spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html...srs.gs-twitter

    ASTROSAT is the first dedicated Indian astronomy mission aimed at studying distant celestial objects. The mission is capable of performing observations in Ultraviolet (UV), optical, low and high energy X-ray wavebands at the same time. The satellite is planned to be launched during the second half of 2015 by PSLV C-34 to a 650 km near equatorial orbit around the Earth. It is significant to note that ASTROSAT is the first mission to be operated as a space observatory by ISRO.

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    The launch date is now set for around October. Another interesting titbit in this article was that two of the payloads were developed with the Canadian Space Agency and the University of Leicester, U.K.

    http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/sci...cle7224853.ece

    The space-based observatory was built at the ISRO Satellite Centre here to operate for five years and will provide useful data for the country’s astronomy community. It will put India in an elite orbit with the U.S., Europe, Russia and Japan.

    “Last week, the spacecraft was fully assembled and switched on. All the [six] payloads and sub-systems are integrated into the satellite. Mechanical fit checks of the satellite with the PSLV [polar satellite launch vehicle] payload adaptor were performed successfully,” the space agency said on its website.

    One of ISRO directors said Astrosat would be the first such satellite to scan simultaneously the sky in most of the frequency spectra from ultraviolet to optical and low- and high-energy X-ray bands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Another interesting titbit in this article...
    ... was also in the previous article.
    Nothing much in this article except narrowing the timing of the launch.

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    We now have some results from Astrosat.

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/mumbai...SF2QWnirM.html

    India’s first astronomy satellite – has, for the very first time, observed rapid oscillations of high energy X-ray emission coming from a black hole. A black hole is an area in space with such high gravity pulls that even light cannot escape, and therefore it is invisible.

    Earlier,NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Experiment (RXTE) had detected similar oscillations in low energy X-rays. However, there was no data on high energy X-rays to be able to understand the physics of emissions of both low and high X-ray energies from a black hole system.

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    AstroSat has now been used to study the Crab pulsar (star) in the Taurus constellation.

    https://m.economictimes.com/news/sci...w/61538005.cms

    "India's multi-wavelength space telescope AstroSat had measured the X-ray polarisation of the Crab pulsar (star) in the Taurus constellation, said space agency ISRO.

    "AstroSat accomplished the difficult task of measuring X-ray polarisation of Crab pulsar in the Taurus constellation during 18-months of its study for the first time," said the Indian Space Research Organisaion (ISRO) in a statement here on Monday.

    ISRO launched its first dedicated space observatory AstroSat on a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (rocket) on September 28, 2015, from its spaceport at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh."

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    AstroSat celebrates 3 years in space.

    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/66063924.cms

    A few days after the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) marked four years in space, another important mission by the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) completed three years.
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    "NASA congratulates Indian scientists for discovering one of the farthest galaxies in the universe"

    https://www.businessinsider.in/scien...w/77883347.cms

    Nearly 10 billion light-years away from Earth, Indian astronomers discovered one of the farthest galaxies in the universe using the country’s first Multi-Wavelength Space Observatory — AstroSat.
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