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Thread: Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

  1. #6061
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    We've been joking here that today was the day Mouse was getting tutored.
    That was a Far Side cartoon years ago!

    When my mother was a child her beloved cat Reddy Rufus "had her tonsils out". But this was in a small town in Wyoming, just 35 years after The Range War. The surgery involved taking a train to another town where the real railroad ran, then another train to Lincoln, NE, where my grandparents were from, seeing the vet, and going back.
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  2. #6062
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    That was a Far Side cartoon years ago!
    Yeah, it's one of a couple of Far Side references we make a lot in the booth, another being "blah blah, Ginger."
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  3. #6063
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    In the comments sections of a YouTube video about flat earthers:

    "The only thing flat earthers have to fear is sphere itself"

    It made me laugh out loud.

  4. #6064
    Whenever I do the last auction. and I picked the first cherry tomatoes off my plants this afternoon.
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  5. #6065
    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    In the comments sections of a YouTube video about flat earthers:

    "The only thing flat earthers have to fear is sphere itself"

    It made me laugh out loud.
    So they must have sphere amd loathing in Las Vegas.
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  6. #6066
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    (Background: We have a double lot, running from Elm Street to Oak Street. We used to live on Elm Street but built a new house on Oak Street. The old garage is down at the old location. Your trees may vary.)
    Anyhow, I was going to town for a few things and decided to stop at the old garage and load a few things into the car rather than carry them up by hand. Wait there were cars next door. Next door is owned by a guy who hasn't actually lived there in several years, house is terribly rundown, and yard overgrown. Especially the weed trees blocking our view. For about the past week they've been fixing a massive water leak.
    The cars were this lady (I've met her at the beauty shop. Petted her dog!) and a customer. Hooray, he's selling it!!!
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  7. #6067
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    (Background: We have a double lot, running from Elm Street to Oak Street. We used to live on Elm Street but built a new house on Oak Street. [snip]
    Did you happen to get Freddy Krueger jokes? Or people asking you if living on Elm street was a nightmare?

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  8. #6068
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    (Background: We have a double lot, running from Elm Street to Oak Street. We used to live on Elm Street but built a new house on Oak Street. The old garage is down at the old location. Your trees may vary.)
    Anyhow, I was going to town for a few things and decided to stop at the old garage and load a few things into the car rather than carry them up by hand. Wait there were cars next door. Next door is owned by a guy who hasn't actually lived there in several years, house is terribly rundown, and yard overgrown. Especially the weed trees blocking our view. For about the past week they've been fixing a massive water leak.
    The cars were this lady (I've met her at the beauty shop. Petted her dog!) and a customer. Hooray, he's selling it!!!
    Now you have sent me on a wild goose chase looking at the 'listings'. As usual, the relative prices make no sense to someone from outside the area - let alone outside the country.

  9. #6069
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Now you have sent me on a wild goose chase looking at the 'listings'. As usual, the relative prices make no sense to someone from outside the area - let alone outside the country.
    Do they seem high or low to you? I live about a hundred miles from the Bay Area (San Francisco and so on) where home prices have gone through the roof (small places well over a million), and a lot of people working there are willing to go on long commutes in order to find more affordable housing, so have been coming our way. Telecommuting has added to that. The last year I’ve been getting mailings from hopeful real estate people who would like to sell my house. It’s getting tiring, since I have no intention of doing that. Anyway, home prices are going up here as well - there is increased demand and what with Covid, building went way down and is only slowly going back up.

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    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  10. #6070
    Even around here the housing market has picked up mostly in the cities like Saint John and Halifax because of how well have done at times in managing it as well as prices for houses in the bigger cities are going thru the house. Even us out in the country 100 km from the largest city just outside a small town got one of those mailers for buying and selling houses.
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  11. #6071
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Do they seem high or low to you? I live about a hundred miles from the Bay Area (San Francisco and so on) where home prices have gone through the roof (small places well over a million), and a lot of people working there are willing to go on long commutes in order to find more affordable housing, so have been coming our way. Telecommuting has added to that. The last year I’ve been getting mailings from hopeful real estate people who would like to sell my house. It’s getting tiring, since I have no intention of doing that. Anyway, home prices are going up here as well - there is increased demand and what with Covid, building went way down and is only slowly going back up.
    Actually I have been reading articles in the NY Times about the housing problems in your area. A similar thing is happening here. To quote a report from January this year "Australia's houses are now more expensive than they have been at any time in history". Of the prices I saw around Port Townsend some seem to be on the lowish side for what appear to be nice houses but with the occasional one popping up as pretty expensive. But I am not sure of the 'desirability' of living in a particular area. The area around Port Townsend always, well mostly, looks lovely in photos but I don't have a real grasp of the demographics. The other trouble is of course trying to remember that $1 Australian is only equal to roughly $0.75 US so I have to keep reminding myself of the exchange difference.

    I had a look at the 'average' price for Port Townsend and got a figure of US$600,000 but that seems to cover mainly the city area so the outer 'suburbs' may be lower. My suburb (Willetton, Perth) is pretty much an 'upper middle class' one with good schools, transport links and local services. It has an average sale price of A$750,000 (US$560,000) which is on the higher side of average for Perth. Perth house prices are a little below 'average' for the larger Australian cities.

    What I was trying to say in my earlier post is that the old catch phrase of 'location, location' seems to be the determinate. When we watch shows like "House Hunters' or the various 'renovation' ones it is the same. Sometimes the prices seem exceptionally low and other times eye poppingly high. It is often hard to gauge why the prices are at the levels shown. I assume in some cases, the house and city may look very nice but the 'locals' may know that there is prison a mile away or there are no job opportunities in the area etc.

  12. #6072
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    Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

    Ozduck, I may be misunderstanding something about your post, but my guess is that VanRijn does not live in Port Townsend (Trebuchet does, though, I think). Port Townsend is way more than 100 miles from SF, probably more than 1,000 miles. You couldnít commute unless you had a private jet.

    ETA: But now Iím guessing you were meaning to respond to Trebuchet. I guess You just quoted the wrong post.

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  13. #6073
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Ozduck, I may be misunderstanding something about your post, but my guess is that VanRijn does not live in Port Townsend (Trebuchet does, though, I think). Port Townsend is way more than 100 miles from SF, probably more than 1,000 miles. You couldn’t commute unless you had a private jet.

    ETA: But now I’m guessing you were meaning to respond to Trebuchet. I guess You just quoted the wrong post.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Jens, I initially responded (post#6068) to Trebuchet's post (#6066) which had, among other things, a link to a Real Estate Agency who operates in the Port Townsend area. When I had a look at that site and dug a bit further - due to ungovernable curiosity - I felt that it was a hard to get a feel for the prices in that area without local knowledge. That is what I was trying to convey in my initial post. Van Rijn then responded (post#6069) to that post of mine by asking "Do they seem high or low to you? I live about a hundred miles from the Bay Area (San Francisco and so on)" plus making some other observations about the increasing house prices in his area of late. My post (#6071) when, again among other comments, I compared my local prices to those in Port Townsend was in response to Van Rijn's post.

    Hopefully this is not too convoluted an explanation - and that I haven't confused myself in thinking I did something different than what I actually did.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2021-Sep-04 at 08:57 AM.

  14. #6074
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Did you happen to get Freddy Krueger jokes? Or people asking you if living on Elm street was a nightmare?
    Next worst thing to having a notable name, that, for people brightly making jokes you've heard umpteen times before.
    There's an Elm Street near us, and I once noticed from a patient's notes that she lived on that street.
    "Oh," I said. "You're on Elm Street!"
    In the moment before I said, "That's just up the road from us," the expression of resentful irritation that swept across her face was a thing to behold.

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  15. #6075
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    Neither Elm nor Oak is the name of our actual streets! Sorry about that.
    Housing seems to be in very short supply here. We've checked and our neighbor's house isn't even officially listed.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #6076
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Neither Elm nor Oak is the name of our actual streets! Sorry about that.
    Housing seems to be in very short supply here. We've checked and our neighbor's house isn't even officially listed.
    Is there still a shortage of lumber for building new houses?

  17. #6077
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    I'm not sure whether it's actually a shortage, but prices are extremely high. Glad we got ours done three years ago. I have been noticing quite a few houses being built.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #6078
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    ...What I was trying to say in my earlier post is that the old catch phrase of 'location, location' seems to be the determinate....
    Maybe, but I'm not so sure in the current market. There's low supply and high demand, and it seems to be most everywhere. A couple years ago, disgusted with the high price of rentals, we went ahead and bought an inexpensive place to live in while our main house was undergoing a serious remodel. For under $200K it's 3 acres with Clark Fork riverfront. Here's the thing -- it's secluded. It's 15 miles to anywhere and another 25 miles to a hospital. This is not what I'd call "location, location." NEVERTHELESS, zillow.com estimates its value has doubled since we bought it. Of course, that doesn't mean it would actually sell for zillow's estimate, but it's a good indication....

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  19. #6079
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Is there still a shortage of lumber for building new houses?
    There shouldn't be with all the clear cutting around here. There a couple of large plots further out on the scale of acres and acres but a lot of that wood is being stored at a yard by the particle board factory my mother use to work at, this also could be for the pulp and paper industry.
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  20. #6080
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    There shouldn't be with all the clear cutting around here. There a couple of large plots further out on the scale of acres and acres but a lot of that wood is being stored at a yard by the particle board factory my mother use to work at, this also could be for the pulp and paper industry.
    You're at the other end of the continent from me, of course.
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  21. #6081
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    Seeing people talk about property outside the cities as lower-priced and unwanted is a bizarre, surreal experience for me. Until certain posts in this thread, I had never in my life seen any indication of anything but the opposite: that that kind of property is expensive precisely because of being out in the country. In fact, I'd love to be able to live at such a place myself, and have had to accept long ago the fact that I'll never be able to, because I'll never be rich enough... for what yall are now telling me would be cheap. Anything even vaguely resembling Cougar's picture would never have a price less than 8 digits long in any place I've ever heard of, and 9 would be more likely, but here it's used as an example of the kind of place you'd normally expect to be able to can get cheap because nobody wants it. Did I somehow bump a "communicate with mirror universe" switch on my modem?

  22. #6082
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    Seeing people talk about property outside the cities as lower-priced and unwanted is a bizarre, surreal experience for me. Until certain posts in this thread, I had never in my life seen any indication of anything but the opposite: that that kind of property is expensive precisely because of being out in the country. In fact, I'd love to be able to live at such a place myself, and have had to accept long ago the fact that I'll never be able to, because I'll never be rich enough... for what yall are now telling me would be cheap. Anything even vaguely resembling Cougar's picture would never have a price less than 8 digits long in any place I've ever heard of, and 9 would be more likely, but here it's used as an example of the kind of place you'd normally expect to be able to can get cheap because nobody wants it. Did I somehow bump a "communicate with mirror universe" switch on my modem?
    But surely that is because New York State is so, relatively, small in area but with a largish population? Once you are in states, or countries, with 'lots of space' then all bets are off and you can reasonably easily find a nice hideaway at an attractive price.

  23. #6083
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    But surely that is because New York State is so, relatively, small in area but with a largish population? Once you are in states, or countries, with 'lots of space' then all bets are off and you can reasonably easily find a nice hideaway at an attractive price.
    To be honest, Iím not sure what Delvo means to say. In New York, you absolutely cannot get an apartment in Manhattan for a lower price than one in Syracuse or Buffalo with the same square footage. Iím not sure where Delvo got that idea. If they are more expensive, I suspect that it might be because they have more square feet.


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  24. #6084
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    But surely that is because New York State is so, relatively, small in area but with a largish population? Once you are in states, or countries, with 'lots of space' then all bets are off and you can reasonably easily find a nice hideaway at an attractive price.
    Incidentally, New York is not that small in area. Itís kind of average among US states, but happens to have a huge concentration of people in the south corner.


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  25. #6085
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Incidentally, New York is not that small in area. It’s kind of average among US states, but happens to have a huge concentration of people in the south corner.


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    I have to admit that I think of New York being a small state probably because I mainly think of the city of New York rather than the whole state. Plus of course it is slightly less than 6% of the size of my own state.

  26. #6086
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    But surely that is because New York State is so, relatively, small in area but with a largish population?
    I live & work almost as far from The Megacity as you can get and still technically be in the same state with it. During my daily drive to work, there's a stretch where I drive along a river that's also the border with Canada and the buildings I see straight ahead of me are in Canada. Outside The Megacity, New York extends a few hundred miles north and west (but no so far northwest). There are a few other major towns/cities like Buffalo and Rochester, especially along the westward section, but with tiny towns & farms & forests between them, so most of your driving hours on that route would be in rural areas and small towns. And the whole northward section is practically empty of humans, mostly just one forest-covered hill/mountain after another... sometimes broken up by cattle pastures and a few small scattered towns, but still, primarily known for its forests, like the Adirondacks and the Catskills.

    I've also lived in Pennsylvania (Harrisburg, with a few dozen thousand people, but not far from the beginning of Appalachian country), Florida (the most rural county in it), and three different areas within Missouri (first a metropolis of over a million people, then a college town, then a couple of different spots in the middle of the woods miles from any town). It's been the same everywhere: the cities always have both expensive properties and the cheapest ones (which is why the word "ghetto" exists and means what it means). But the more out in the open you go, the more the cheap end of that range shrivels up. So the less rich you are, the more unaffordable those out-in-the-open properties become, so the more you are steered into a city because that's all you can afford.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    In New York, you absolutely cannot get an apartment in Manhattan for a lower price than one in Syracuse or Buffalo with the same square footage.
    The comparison was not between one city and another city, but between city and country.

  27. #6087
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post

    I've also lived in Pennsylvania (Harrisburg, with a few dozen thousand people, but not far from the beginning of Appalachian country), Florida (the most rural county in it), and three different areas within Missouri (first a metropolis of over a million people, then a college town, then a couple of different spots in the middle of the woods miles from any town). It's been the same everywhere: the cities always have both expensive properties and the cheapest ones (which is why the word "ghetto" exists and means what it means). But the more out in the open you go, the more the cheap end of that range shrivels up. So the less rich you are, the more unaffordable those out-in-the-open properties become, so the more you are steered into a city because that's all you can afford.
    I see what you mean now. I think that is probably true everywhere. I was really reacting to your earlier comment:

    Seeing people talk about property outside the cities as lower-priced and unwanted is a bizarre, surreal experience for me. Until certain posts in this thread, I had never in my life seen any indication of anything but the opposite: that that kind of property is expensive precisely because of being out in the country.
    To me that implied it was because properties are in the country that they are more expensive. For the same square footage, I think generally that it becomes cheaper to live when you move out of the city (which is why people say, "teachers can't afford to live in Manhattan" or whatever), but yes, it is true that you can't easily find low-income housing. For example, housing projects are overwhelmingly in cities for a variety of reasons. In fact, most people used to live in the countryside, whether they were rich or poor, and people have moved into cities. In fact, there is rural poverty, and there are people living in trailer parks for example, but it's not a very fluid market so it would be unusual for a person living in the city to choose to move into a trailer park in the countryside (but not unheard of I'm sure). So yes, for low-income people the countryside may seem to be luxurious and expensive.
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  28. #6088
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post

    I've also lived in Pennsylvania (Harrisburg, with a few dozen thousand people, but not far from the beginning of Appalachian country), Florida (the most rural county in it), and three different areas within Missouri (first a metropolis of over a million people, then a college town, then a couple of different spots in the middle of the woods miles from any town). It's been the same everywhere: the cities always have both expensive properties and the cheapest ones (which is why the word "ghetto" exists and means what it means). But the more out in the open you go, the more the cheap end of that range shrivels up. So the less rich you are, the more unaffordable those out-in-the-open properties become, so the more you are steered into a city because that's all you can afford.
    I see what you mean now. I think that is probably true everywhere. I was really reacting to your earlier comment:

    Seeing people talk about property outside the cities as lower-priced and unwanted is a bizarre, surreal experience for me. Until certain posts in this thread, I had never in my life seen any indication of anything but the opposite: that that kind of property is expensive precisely because of being out in the country.
    To me that implied it was because properties are in the country that they are more expensive. For the same square footage, I think generally that it becomes cheaper to live when you move out of the city (which is why people say, "teachers can't afford to live in Manhattan" or whatever), but yes, it is true that you can't easily find low-income housing. For example, housing projects are overwhelmingly in cities for a variety of reasons. In fact, most people used to live in the countryside, whether they were rich or poor, and people have moved into cities. In fact, there is rural poverty, and there are people living in trailer parks for example, but it's not a very fluid market so it would be unusual for a person living in the city to choose to move into a trailer park in the countryside (but not unheard of I'm sure). So yes, for low-income people the countryside may seem to be luxurious and expensive.
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  29. #6089
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Mzillow.com estimates its value has doubled since we bought it.
    Zillow has some oddities in its estimates. I live in a neighborhood where homes were quickly put up after WW II. Many have had extensive renovation, while some have not. Often a house will be put on the market and the Zillow estimate will suddenly jump 50% simply due to the listing (not a sale) being much higher than Zillowís estimate the prior day. Similarly, one house price estimate suddenly dropped by around 30% when it was listed as a foreclosure auction.
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  30. #6090
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I have to admit that I think of New York being a small state probably because I mainly think of the city of New York rather than the whole state. Plus of course it is slightly less than 6% of the size of my own state.
    Yeah, it certainly depends on your perspective. New York State has a population density of about 160 people/square km. In Western Australia you have just 1 per square km! And by contrast, in Tokyo prefecture we have more than 6,000 per square km! So I think you and I are kind of the outliers.
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