Page 157 of 160 FirstFirst ... 57107147155156157158159 ... LastLast
Results 4,681 to 4,710 of 4778

Thread: Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

  1. #4681
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    8,795
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    My understanding (I'm doing this from memory and am going to skip my usual digging for references) is that a lot of cultures have Winter solstice celebrations that involve lights, fire, etc., as a counter to the cold and dark of this time of year, and often associated with the idea of getting the sun to come back and bring warmth and light to the world (at least in the non-tropical parts of the world).

    There is also considerable evidence that the historic Jesus was actually not born around the Winter solstice (for example, records of when the Romans actually did the census), but at some point the celebration of the birth of Jesus got tied to the Winter solstice celebration of various Northern Hemisphere cultures.
    That's right, I am sure one of the many functions of stonehenge was to predict the solstice and archeology suggests big parties with folks coming from afar. The winter parties were adopted by the early church. That's Northern hemisphere stuff, obviously.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #4682
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,026
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    My understanding (I'm doing this from memory and am going to skip my usual digging for references) is that a lot of cultures have Winter solstice celebrations that involve lights, fire, etc., as a counter to the cold and dark of this time of year, and often associated with the idea of getting the sun to come back and bring warmth and light to the world (at least in the non-tropical parts of the world).
    Oh, yes. Terry Pratchett's Hogfather talks a lot about it, if you're looking for a . . . non-scholarly work on the subject.

    There is also considerable evidence that the historic Jesus was actually not born around the Winter solstice (for example, records of when the Romans actually did the census), but at some point the celebration of the birth of Jesus got tied to the Winter solstice celebration of various Northern Hemisphere cultures.
    There's direct contradiction to the idea in the Gospel--shepherds don't watch their flocks by night in December, after all.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  3. #4683
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Clear Lake City, TX
    Posts
    12,701
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    There's direct contradiction to the idea in the Gospel--shepherds don't watch their flocks by night in December, after all.
    April, most likely, when the ewes are giving birth.

    And, yes, the early church usurped the winter solstice celebrations in general (Saturnalia in particular).

    And many Easter traditions came from the pagan festival of the spring equinox. The name itself is from the goddess Eostre, AKA Kristin Chenowith.

    And Halloween (All Hallow's Eve, the day before All Saints Day) is based on the Celtic Samhain.

    No sense letting a good pagan celebration go unclaimed.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They donít alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

    Moderation will be in purple.
    Rules for Posting to This Board

  4. #4684
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,805
    A PhD student in history with a focus on history of religions and a YouTube channel about it tells us the historical evidence about how Jesus's birth got assigned to December 25ᵗʰ:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DHbOpS-N0c

    Short version:

    •There's no particular evidence connecting it to Saturnalia, Invictus, or other solstice events, either in written text or in exactly what customs applied.
    •The church at the time didn't have the power to impose such a declaration and have people actually go along with it.
    •Eastern churches never had Christmas in December; they had it on January 6ᵗʰ, nowhere near a solstice or equinox or even the halfway points between them.
    •The oldest relevant manuscripts give us a documented alternative explanation: it put Jesus's conception on the day of his death (March 25ᵗʰ), which fit their sense of cosmic symmetry/circularity.
    •The same explanation also explains the date discrepancy; eastern churches with a later Christmas also have a later Easter, by the same 12-day margin (April 6ᵗʰ).

    He also has another video in which he makes another point that fits here, although he didn't include it in this one. Religions frequently import stuff from other religions without any plot by pushy authority figures to manipulate people and use it as a trick to force or sneak their religion onto the outsiders, but just because people were exposed to it and liked it or found that some of the pieces of two or more traditions fit together well enough. It's called "syncretism", and it's always been routine everywhere. So there's no need to invoke such conspiracies when the evidence doesn't point us toward that any more than it points us toward "people just started doing this other thing they were familiar with too", and especially not when the more cynical description goes directly against what is known of the importing religion's power structure or lack thereof, as in this case.

    Why Easter was on the spring equinox could involve some syncretic inheritance from older Middle Eastern traditions, but even that's not really necessary either, because the idea that solstices and equinoxes are important dates when important things might be expected to happen is vague enough to not need to be transferred from one culture to another; it's too easy to come up with independently, especially if you have the kind of sense of cosmic balance that was common back then.
    Last edited by Delvo; 2019-Dec-13 at 06:41 AM.

  5. #4685
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,805
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I kind of think that was a reason Christmas is in December. All the decorations, lights, parties, and such make things a bit less miserable in the cold, dark north this time of year.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    My understanding (I'm doing this from memory and am going to skip my usual digging for references) is that a lot of cultures have Winter solstice celebrations that involve lights, fire, etc., as a counter to the cold and dark of this time of year, and often associated with the idea of getting the sun to come back and bring warmth and light to the world (at least in the non-tropical parts of the world).
    And warm, heavy food & drinks... but January or February would have been a better fit. That's one reason why I like Wicca/Witta's halfway days, making 8 holidays per year. If a time of year with a noteworthy theme to it, like harvest time and the turn to autumnal weather, doesn't land on or near a solstice or equinox, you can just declare a thematic holiday between them, like how we got Halloween (although that did end up getting backed up a bit from the exact halfway point).

    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    There is also considerable evidence that the historic Jesus...
    ...if we are to stipulate that such a person existed...
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    ...was actually not born around the Winter solstice (for example, records of when the Romans actually did the census)
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    There's direct contradiction to the idea in the Gospel--shepherds don't watch their flocks by night in December, after all.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    April, most likely, when the ewes are giving birth.
    There are a handful of contradictions in this, mostly because of the fixation of the author of the Gospel of Matthew on repeatedly coming up with contrivances to make Jesus appear to be fulfilling prophecies or re-enacting/echoing Old Testament stories practically everywhere he went. This is the Gospel that keeps saying something like "and thus it was fulfilled as it had been foretold" at the end of most of its stories, and is famous for stuff like having Jesus simultaneously ride two animals into Jerusalem because the author didn't understand Ancient Hebrew poetic emphatic repetition, and making up a need for Joseph to haul Mary across the country while she was pregnant so the author would have a way to say the Messiah was really from both Nazareth and Bethlehem to fit two conflicting prophecies together. Making up a "slaughter of the firstborns" that didn't happen was an especially clever one because it let the author do a few separate things: paint Jesus as a new Moses starting out with a narrow escape/rescue from death while very young, give a reason to say the family went to Egypt so their return from there would parallel the Jews' return from Egypt in Exodus, and present another parallel with the slaughter of the firstborns in Exodus so Jesus's subsequent delivery of the world from evil would thus parallel the delivery of the Jews from Egypt. Sometimes the Gospel of Matthew even has Jesus fulfilling prophecies that we don't even hear of anywhere else.

    In that light, it's easy to see why the Gospel of Matthew creates so much historical trouble for the story. Why say the census required men to travel to where their ancestors had lived centuries earlier, which we know censi didn't do? Because the travel was the whole point, a better excuse for it couldn't be found, and it was written long enough afterward that the audience would be vaguely aware that there had once been a census a few generations before but not familiar with how it had really worked. Why say it was ordered by the wrong Emperor? Because it's long enough before that the author might not even know who really ordered it, and/or because different Emperors had different reputations in Palestine and the wrong one's reputation somehow fit the theme better. Why say Herod was king at the time when that doesn't fit with the given combination of named Roman political figures? Because you need a "slaughter of the firstborns", it was written long enough afterward for the audience to be unsure of who had held which office back then, and Herod was still hated enough generations later for people to buy that he would have done that.

    Another apparent oddity about the Bible's stories that are often thought of as Christmas stories now is actually not the issue some people might think it is, though. We have one story where the family is met by shepherds and one where they're met by three magi, but there's no need to figure out which was real or imagine each set of visitors being there at the same time as the other set but somehow being left out of the other set's story. The magi don't show up until Jesus is a "child", not a baby, and Herod orders the deaths of not all babies under two months old but all children under two years old. The magi and shepherds missed each other by up to two years. Any nativity display with both together is unBiblical.
    Last edited by Delvo; 2019-Dec-14 at 02:05 AM.

  6. #4686
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,382
    I'm not convinced there's a problem with shepherds watching their flocks by night in December in the Holy Land.
    The indigenous Awassi sheep were often grazed all year round by nomads, and winter being a rainy season means grazing is better at that time of year than in the spring and summer. The presence of wolves means that prudent shepherds would maintain a nocturnal presence near their sheep.

    Grant Hutchison

  7. #4687
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    12,945
    We've strayed a bit too far off the topic, even for an OTB thread. If there's interest (report this post to say so) I can split posts into their own thread.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  8. #4688
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    11,910
    If I see a mod post in a thread I participate in, I check in to see if it was me.

    You'd think I'd flip to the obituaries first in the paper, but I assume that if I wake to coffee and a paper, my day isn't going to be that bad.
    Solfe

  9. #4689
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,026
    Before I Had Kids, my natural time to wake up was about ten AM. They didn't let me sleep quite that late this morning, but 9:40 isn't bad!
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  10. #4690
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,026
    Yesterday, Simon was home sick--and you could tell he was really sick, because he slept pretty much all day and went to bed not all that late after his usual bedtime. This morning, I took him to the bus, and we gave the bus driver the Christmas tree ornament I'd made him. The grin on his face was worth the fact that Simon had insisted on something that was actually considerably more work than I'd planned. Instead of a simple geometrical design, Simon had insisted on a cross stitch Pikachu, as his bus driver gives the kids Pokemon cards if they're good.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  11. #4691
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    4,962
    I'm happy that member Grant Hutchison inadvertently triggered my memories of the TV show "Planet Patrol" ("Space Patrol" in the UK) while posting in the "Bugs Me" thread.
    I have great memories of watching it with my brother (since passed) as kids.

    As I mentioned in the other thread, nobody else we encountered seemed to remember it.
    We got many strange looks while telling people that it had puppets (marionettes) named Slim and Husky... and they flew through space -- in a gyroscope -- that made a "do do do do" sound.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  12. #4692
    -10 C a bit breezy, helping some stuff done before trip to see star wars tomorrow, plus niece 2 has a hockey game in town tonight,
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  13. #4693
    Today had a good day. Woke up and it was -13C out and left in a hurry. Got to the theater just in time to see some space flick, Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, good movie I wish there were some more to fill in the back story. Had some pizza and salad at some a pizza of course just finished the left over salad. Did a little shopping and heeded home. Wish I had a bit more dough for gifts.
    Last edited by The Backroad Astronomer; 2019-Dec-21 at 12:29 AM.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  14. #4694
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    10,993
    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    -10 C a bit breezy, helping some stuff done before trip to see star wars tomorrow, plus niece 2 has a hockey game in town tonight,
    Steam is advertising its winter sale.

    I'm sweating here.

    Do they know the world is round?

    I presume that's ice hockey?
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  15. #4695
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,026
    Irene is so excited by her Yule presents that she doesn't even care that one of them is unfinished. She was still introducing her new dolls to one another, even though one is still bald.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  16. #4696
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,579
    I just unwrapped a big gift which had the majestic 21309 (Google knows!) inside. The kids understood this one was for dad.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  17. #4697
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Steam is advertising its winter sale.

    I'm sweating here.

    Do they know the world is round?

    I presume that's ice hockey?
    I don't about steam maybe it should be called a solstice sale. Yes it was ice hockey, and here is a picture of the rink upside down for same reason, no we haven't invented anti-gravity hockey. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20191219_184154[1].jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	928.9 KB 
ID:	24764
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  18. #4698
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    14,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I just unwrapped a big gift which had the majestic 21309 (Google knows!) inside. The kids understood this one was for dad.
    I Googled. I was somehow hoping for a steam locomotive, but that'll do.

    My wife and I are at home by ourselves today, but have exchanged cards, had a nice dinner, and talked to family on the phone. All is good.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #4699
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,382
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Steam is advertising its winter sale.

    I'm sweating here.

    Do they know the world is round?
    I believe the town of "Steamville", which is hosting their "Holiday Market", is situated in relatively high northern latitudes - it certainly seems to be snowing there at present.

    Grant Hutchison

  20. #4700
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,935
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I just unwrapped a big gift which had the majestic 21309 (Google knows!) inside. The kids understood this one was for dad.
    We havenít exchanged gifts yet (just got back from visiting in laws down in Florida) but one of the boxes has a nice rattle...and itís about the right size!

    Film at 11.

  21. #4701
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    10,993
    Seems I should clarify; "Steam" is (in short) an internet based marketplace for buying computer games. It's for an international market (though the U.S. is it's biggest, I suppose).


    I have 3 x 21309, one to be left unopened, other two so I can display stacked and un-stacked. Waiting for 10266 to become easily available here. Bought myself 42110 for Xmas. That was all happy making.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  22. #4702
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,382
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Seems I should clarify; "Steam" is (in short) an internet based marketplace for buying computer games. It's for an international market (though the U.S. is it's biggest, I suppose).
    Yes, they're the folk who pretend to operate out of a fantasy town called Steamville, where it's snowing.

    Grant Hutchison

  23. #4703
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,935
    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    We havenít exchanged gifts yet (just got back from visiting in laws down in Florida) but one of the boxes has a nice rattle...and itís about the right size!

    Film at 11.
    And we have a winner! So I know what Iíll be doing over the next few days - or weeks (Iím slow with this stuff - especially with 1,969 pieces.)

  24. #4704
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,579
    As a side note, for the number of parts, 21309 actually is a cheap set. When you can buy it 25% off, it becomes dirt cheap.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  25. #4705
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,579
    I have just completed the first stage. I love how this set has everything printed, no decals. And up to now, I haven't found any piece unique to this set which I also appreciate in Lego. Some creative finds, such as using "wooden tub" pieces in grey and upside down as the lower part of the engine nozzles. Some steps weren't too easy, but overall building went fast. The proportions of this model are excellent, especially given it's a very round shape and it's still Lego.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  26. #4706
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,579
    Completed the second stage today, together with the kids. A bit surprised to see we've already built 10 out of 12 bags while there's still a lot of stuff to make, but the upper stages are that much thinner that the parts count goes way down up there. Be well awake before attempting the second stage, as it contains some rather complex geometry on top. But the result is once again superb.

    Small tip if you find your J2 engines falling apart: you have to push the white rods all the way up into the orange "lamps".
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  27. #4707
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,579
    The Lego Saturn V is finished. I've displayed it next to my 5590, so now I've got a big and realistic rocket and a big and realistic helicopter (and two iconic sets from different eras). What I'm still missing in the "don't play with these" cabinet is a big and realistic airplane. The best I can find is the 10226 Sopwith Camel. I prefer it over the Red Baron and I find the 787 model quite ugly in the front. Someone know anything better than the 10226? It would complete my aerospace trinity. Well, I'd also need the Ideas Mountbatten class hovercraft, but unfortunately that stunning model wasn't chosen by Lego due to lack of supporters.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  28. #4708
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    5,924
    As we left a building just a few hours ago, we walked into a very palpable mist, 5though the sky was sunny. I was sure there'd be a rainbow ... and there it was right across the street! Mrs M got a picture of it.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	rainbow.jpg 
Views:	26 
Size:	282.7 KB 
ID:	24771

    I'm impressed at how it appears to pass in front of the trees and land right on the street. No pot of gold was found, however.

  29. #4709
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,579
    Did you look carefully? Possibly said pot of gold was not a pot filled with golden coins, but rather an empty pot made out of gold. Or a golden pot filled with golden coins, the proverbial jackpot of gold. So many questions, so few rainbows.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  30. #4710
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,329
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    The Lego Saturn V is finished. I've displayed it next to my 5590, so now I've got a big and realistic rocket and a big and realistic helicopter (and two iconic sets from different eras). What I'm still missing in the "don't play with these" cabinet is a big and realistic airplane. The best I can find is the 10226 Sopwith Camel. I prefer it over the Red Baron and I find the 787 model quite ugly in the front. Someone know anything better than the 10226? It would complete my aerospace trinity. Well, I'd also need the Ideas Mountbatten class hovercraft, but unfortunately that stunning model wasn't chosen by Lego due to lack of supporters.
    Can you still get the Japanese research submersible? That one looked cool.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •