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Thread: Stuff you just don't get.

  1. #4831
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Normal burning, including house fires, can get iron red hot at about 800 C. That will melt aluminium, tin, lead, and some bronzes but not copper (about 1200 C) or iron, even higher. The natural convection will bring in plenty of oxygen unless the fire is specially contained, as in a furnace. If you blow in extra air, charcoal (carbon) will heat up enough to melt copper or iron. Big enough natural fires can induce inward winds to raise the burning temperature, but that is exceptional. It is why we were stuck in the stone age so long!
    I find it fascinating that firefighter equipment works up to 1000 degrees. Most of their gear looks mundane.

    I try not to think about it. The fire in my house was hot enough to make them retreat from the building due to temperature. I was tempted to ask if that 1000 degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit, but I noticed that the copper pipes melted and iron pipes cracked near the source of the fire. If they meant Fahrenheit, they they dodged a bullet by exiting when they did because it was way hotter than that. They actually went back in under a sheet of water, room by room to put out the fire. Insane.

    What is creepy is the heat gradients. In the back of the house just above where the fire broke out, the plaster walls burned from ceiling to shoulder level. The walls and studs are gone, like someone took a giant knife and cut them away. The fridge is 8 inches shorter because it melted in the heat. The ceiling stayed in place until the water saturated it. If the plasterboard ceilings had given out the roof could have caught fire. Any hole in roof would have blown the house apart.

    Ironically, they discovered asbestos in the house. Absolutely everywhere on the first floor. They suspect the popcorn ceiling was made of it. That might be why the ceiling and roof didn't catch fire but the walls did, the decorative layer of asbestos was just enough to hold the fire for a bit. And not strong enough to stay in place when soaked.

    In the attic just above the fridge, there is a 10 man tent resting on a ceiling joist. It didn't melt or burn. It's super strange to see.
    Solfe

  2. #4832
    All I know for sure right now is I need a nap soon.
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  3. #4833
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    I think I posted in the "what are you reading" thread that I was reading the first of Colin Dexter's Inspector Morse novels. From 1975.

    Now that I've finished it, a major plot point was that the victim had had sexual relations with one of the suspects, in the back seat of his car. Which was earlier in the book described as a Mini. Not the current type, the original much smaller version. Ok, there was some equivocation later on and it might have been an Austin 1100. Which at least was available with four doors. But still, they must have been pretty acrobatic!

    When in college, I made out with my girlfriend in a Corvair. That was a much larger car and still awkward.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #4834
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    The back seat of my Alpine is about as spacious as the one in the original Mini, but with a huge obstruction in the middle under which the gearbox sits.

    No, we haven't even bothered to try. The car is said to provide fun in other ways. I was OK with the back seat being this small as it was just for the kids. But the work on the car is taking so long that I'm afraid the kids will be too tall when it's finished. I haven't tried sitting in there myself. I know adults can be stored in the back seat of a 911, so it should be possible.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  5. #4835
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Now that I've finished it, a major plot point was that the victim had had sexual relations with one of the suspects, in the back seat of his car. Which was earlier in the book described as a Mini.
    Old medical joke.
    Background: The human egg cell is not actually fertilized in the uterus, as you might guess, but when it encounters a spermatozoan as it is still passing down the Fallopian tube. Hence the stock embryology test question, "Where does fertilization take place?"
    And the story goes that one day a medical student answered, "In the back seat of a Mini."
    His paper came back with that question marked "Zero points for anatomy; congratulations to all concerned for flexibility."

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  6. #4836
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I know adults can be stored in the back seat of a 911, so it should be possible.
    Stored? Is that alive or dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Old medical joke.
    Background: The human egg cell is not actually fertilized in the uterus, as you might guess, but when it encounters a spermatozoan as it is still passing down the Fallopian tube. Hence the stock embryology test question, "Where does fertilization take place?"
    And the story goes that one day a medical student answered, "In the back seat of a Mini."
    His paper came back with that question marked "Zero points for anatomy; congratulations to all concerned for flexibility."


    I had an occasion in college where I was one of two passengers in the passenger seat of some little two-seat sports car (the driver occupying their own seat). I can't imagine doing anything more than just trying to keep breathing.
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  7. #4837
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    Stored? Is that alive or dead?
    The choice of words was deliberate. Ever had the "pleasure" of sitting in the backseat of a classic 911 as an adult? You have to fold yourself up like laundry, or preferably have no lower legs. I don't know which one has the worse back seat, the 911 or my Alpine. My Alpine certainly has the worst frunk of the two, with the double wishbone protruding in. If you really want to go for minimal back seat space, I think the Maserati Merak beats most cars out there. It took me decades of superficial familiarity with the model before realizing it even had a back seat.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  8. #4838
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    Stuff I just don't get: any of that general type of car. They whole type is notorious for horrendous driving experience in a variety of ways, but we're all supposed to act like that makes them better than other cars!

  9. #4839
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    Mechanical horses for courses. The Merak especially is a car where the enjoyment is very niche indeed. For most car use cases it's the worst possible choice. It's not a racecar or rally car, it's a horrible cargo hauler and family car. It's really only good to look at or to enjoy with 1 or 2 people, where I hope the ergonomics are any good. So yeah, if you buy that kind of car you really have to think ahead of when and how you'd be able to enjoy it.

    I've not driven a 911 but I had a 944 for years and it was a superb grand tourer for 2 people. The trunk plus rear bench provided ample cargo space, lots of width for the people in front, and somehow those 30 year old sports seats gave absolute comfort at 700km per day through the Alps. Never arrived feeling so well after a long ride. That truly was a car I could recommend as a daily driver for people without kids and preferably who also own another larger car. The 911 has more limited cargo space but could still fit that role.

    The Alpine is just like the Merak in that it has nonexistent cargo space. So it is just as useless if you're going somewhere carrying anything other than yourself. With one big, big exception and that's why I bought it: it is a great rally car. The other rides would be just the filler between the rally events I planned on doing with it. Planned, because by the time the car will be finished its value might have become a bit too high for me to risk in rally. First world problems.

    But if you don't consider the limited use case for this kind of car, you'd be fooling yourself indeed. Just because a car a great, great grand tourer/sports car/supercar does NOT make it a great car across the board. I pity the family whose only car is a Ferrari F40.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  10. #4840
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    The choice of words was deliberate. Ever had the "pleasure" of sitting in the backseat of a classic 911 as an adult? You have to fold yourself up like laundry, or preferably have no lower legs. I don't know which one has the worse back seat, the 911 or my Alpine. My Alpine certainly has the worst frunk of the two, with the double wishbone protruding in. If you really want to go for minimal back seat space, I think the Maserati Merak beats most cars out there. It took me decades of superficial familiarity with the model before realizing it even had a back seat.
    I missed this , being away, but remember once I had to ride from Brussels to Frankfurt in the back of a 911, folded, shaken, deafened, I would not want a repeat. But I never tried a Maserati.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  11. #4841
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    You know on old cars, there would be some horrible form of backseat that folded out of hte back or the side, zero comfort. They were called "mother-in-law-seats." I'd use the same word for the back seat of small sports cars. They're meant to transport people, just not people you like.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  12. #4842
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    The Intel update service correctly tells me which Intel processor and Intel graphics card I have, proceeds to let me download their Intel graphics driver update, only to give me a message that the update isn't compatible with the processor. If they can't conclude that before the download, how am I supposed to have any confidence in any of their proposed updates anyway?
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  13. #4843
    I am having a problem in determining whether or not the new intel chips have graphics on them or if you need a graphics card.
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  14. #4844
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    The way I understand it, Intel Core processors have onboard graphics UNLESS they have an "F" at the end of their name. Their (virtual) box also in that case has "discrete graphics required" written on it. And any decent webshop should also indicate it explicitly.

    The price difference between the version with and without tends to be around $20 for an i7, so unless you need a separate graphics card for performance anyway, both financially and in terms of power consumption it is wise to choose the version with onboard graphics.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  15. #4845
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    The Intel update service correctly tells me which Intel processor and Intel graphics card I have, proceeds to let me download their Intel graphics driver update, only to give me a message that the update isn't compatible with the processor. If they can't conclude that before the download, how am I supposed to have any confidence in any of their proposed updates anyway?
    To add insult to injury, they are now reminding me daily that there is an update I haven't installed yet...
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  16. #4846
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    The way I understand it, Intel Core processors have onboard graphics UNLESS they have an "F" at the end of their name. Their (virtual) box also in that case has "discrete graphics required" written on it. And any decent webshop should also indicate it explicitly.

    The price difference between the version with and without tends to be around $20 for an i7, so unless you need a separate graphics card for performance anyway, both financially and in terms of power consumption it is wise to choose the version with onboard graphics.
    Thanks for the response. This is pretty much a thought exercise at the moment.
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  17. #4847
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    A large surface area. Powdered aluminium burns quite nicely. Then again, so does powdered iron.
    When I was a kid, one of my favorites was blowing a handful of flour at a flame, producing an explosion, a ​not uncommon cause of explosions in grain silos.

    When I went into the drugstore and picked up sulfur and powdered charcoal, the druggist showed me where the potassium nitrate was.

  18. #4848
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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    When I was a kid, one of my favorites was blowing a handful of flour at a flame, producing an explosion, a ​not uncommon cause of explosions in grain silos.

    When I went into the drugstore and picked up sulfur and powdered charcoal, the druggist showed me where the potassium nitrate was.
    He wasnít named Fawkes was he?

  19. #4849
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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    When I was a kid, one of my favorites was blowing a handful of flour at a flame, producing an explosion, a ​not uncommon cause of explosions in grain silos.

    When I went into the drugstore and picked up sulfur and powdered charcoal, the druggist showed me where the potassium nitrate was.
    When I was a kid, there was a grain elevator fire in my hometown. Or, fortunately, a little outside although I'm sure it is fully developed now.
    Like most of the residents, my family drove out there to watch. Holy cow, that was spectacular. I vividly remember it more than 60 years later. Who needs rocket fuel, just use some wheat!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  20. #4850
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    When I was a kid, there was a grain elevator fire in my hometown. Or, fortunately, a little outside although I'm sure it is fully developed now.
    Like most of the residents, my family drove out there to watch. Holy cow, that was spectacular. I vividly remember it more than 60 years later. Who needs rocket fuel, just use some wheat!
    Back in 2011-2012, when the local sawmills were dealing with almost 100% of their log supply being dry logs from trees that had died years earlier in the mountain pine beetle epidemic, two of the mills suffered massive explosions and fires that killed employees.

    The dry logs produce a lot of very fine dust when sawn, and the mills weren't being adequately cleaned. Once any of it ignited, all of it ignited.

    I heard from someone who had experienced a sawmill explosion years earlier. He said that the initial explosion knocked off dust that had collected in the roof trusses. This was followed by multiple secondary explosions that advanced the length of the building.

    Usually the insurance companies made sure the plants were being kept clean. Someone wasn't paying attention.

  21. #4851
    We have a particle board plant that is in middle of closing down some of different lines. About 25 years ago there was fire caused by by some welding next to a giant pile chips and sawdust. After that the built a building around the pile that had a system in it to keep the fire down, also they built a platform that a truck could park on and it tip the truck up so the back would be tilted downwards to get all the chips out. Somedays when I needed the car I had to go in with mother to do a car swap and you would see a transport just hanging there.
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  22. #4852
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    That's how they're unloaded here too.

    Not sure where this picture was taken, but for those not familiar with it, this is what we're talking about.

    ETA: Seems the pic is from Australia.
    Last edited by Torsten; 2021-Nov-16 at 04:30 AM.

  23. #4853
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    If you'd told me it was a still fom Thunderbirds, I'd only not believed you because I would not be able to fit it in any episode I know.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  24. #4854
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    It's the latest project from SpaceX!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #4855
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    A company where I worked years and years ago installed a new spray dryer at one location. Because the spray dryer generated a dust cloud while in service, and dust clouds as mentioned above can go boom, they also installed a state-of-the-art monitor that would detect an explosive mixture and inject a chemical spray to snub any potential explosion before it happened.

    The spray dryer was installed, commissioned, and started up. It ran for 30 minutes before the monitor shut off feeds and injected the snubbing chemical. This meant the entire dryer had to be taken offline and cleaned out, an expensive and time consuming procedure.

    This happened again the next 4-5 times they tried to start the dryer. Finally it was decided that the monitor was getting false readings so they took it offline and started the dryer.

    It ran for almost an hour before blowing up.
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  26. #4856
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    ...
    It ran for almost an hour before blowing up.
    I'd file that in the category of "Trust your instruments."

  27. #4857
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I'd file that in the category of "Trust your instruments."
    And "don't disable safety interlocks and unless you are really, really (I mean REALLY) sure it is safe to do so; and even then it is probably a bad idea".
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  28. #4858
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    Our power utility recently offered a "box o' bulbs" for $10. It consists of several LED bulbs of various types that are likely to be used around the house.
    It came with two "smart" bulbs, which can be controlled via WiFi. You can set them for various color temperatures as well as any color of the rainbow, plus several "disco modes".

    This really seems to me like a solution in search of a problem. The only remotely practical use of the feature would be to match other bulbs in the same room. Even then, the hassle factor of controlling it via WiFi and a phone app seem worse than going to the hardware store for a matching bulb.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  29. #4859
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    This really seems to me like a solution in search of a problem. The only remotely practical use of the feature would be to match other bulbs in the same room. Even then, the hassle factor of controlling it via WiFi and a phone app seem worse than going to the hardware store for a matching bulb.
    Iíve had remote controlled light bulbs for decades, though I did it through X10 switches (which are still being sold, though are no longer the best option). Mostly I have things like an automatic shut off after a certain hour, combined with a motion sensor. Iím starting to update and have lights I can turn on/off and dim by voice command. Nice, for instance, when Iím in bed and want the light off but am on the edge of sleeping and donít want to get up.

    I havenít gotten into changing lighting colors.

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  30. #4860
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    Stuff I just don't get: yellow light temperatures, and people claiming there's anything good about them, anywhere, ever. I realize they were hard to avoid with tungsten technology because going to real white would require an extra bump up in temperature in an already-very-hot thing that gets damaged by its own heat (and it was even worse before that, when the only light option at night was fire), but we're past that technology now, so there's no longer any need to put up with its side-effect of making everything in the room look like it's coated in motor oil! But now that it's easy to avoid, we're still stuck with a lighting market in which practically every lighting fixture you can buy with its LEDs built in still has that disgusting yellow color anyway, so getting light that's just plain neutral white requires making sure you have a fixture that takes a separate bulb and getting the right bulb. On top of that, some manufacturers label their bulbs in a way that doesn't really tell you the color temperature so you can't trust any bulbs from that company, because their idea of how to describe color temperature is with phrases that all have the word "white" in them no matter how far they are from actual white. No, you &$#@, your &$#@ light isn't any version of "white", it's just one of several intensities of &$#@ YELLOW! Calling a urine stain "urine-stain white" doesn't make it white, or anything else but a urine stain, and quit trying to trick me into contaminating the light in my home with that! And yet I sometimes hear interior designers/decorators talking about which light temperatures are best for which kind of room, and they've actually been somehow manipulated into not only speaking in those dishonest "white" terms but also claiming that there can possibly ever be any place where one of those "yellow whites" could possible be better than just white white. There's just no way to make a speck of sense out of such behavior.
    Last edited by Delvo; 2021-Nov-20 at 10:54 PM.

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