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Thread: Indian Mars Mission

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    I'm bumping this thread since selvaarchi seems to want to throw MOM items in other threads:

    From the Maven Thread:

    Not exactly new. MOM"s proximity to the comet was known for over a year.
    In fact, they aren't sure if they need to maneuver it (like some others will) to avoid damage.
    But; they do believe they will have the best position for viewing.
    Reference.
    Have you read the article. It is clearly more on Mavin then MOM.

    “The MAVEN spacecraft will make very interesting observations,” Roger Yelle also told Universe Today. “The comet will perturb primarily the upper atmosphere of Mars and MAVEN was designed to study the upper atmosphere of Mars. Also, it’s just such an incredible coincidence that the comet arrives at Mars less than one month after MAVEN does. MAVEN is nominally in its checkout phase then, and the main science phase of the mission was not scheduled to start until November 1st. However, we are reassessing our plans to see what observations we can make. It’s all quite exciting, and we have to balance safety and the desire to make the best science measurements.”
    One year ago no study could have been done on the coma. Note when the study was published.

    The comet is C/2013 A1 Siding Spring, and the planet in question Mars. And although an impact of the comet on the surface of the Red Planet has long been ruled out, a paper in the May 2014 issue of Icarus raises the interesting possibility of possible interactions of the coma of A1 Siding Spring and the tenuous atmosphere of Mars. The study comes out of the Department of Planetary Sciences at the University of Arizona, the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, the Institut de Planétologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble at the Université J. Fourier in France, and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Have you read the article. It is clearly more on Mavin then MOM.
    Exactly, you mentioned MOM and how something is going to be new to it. The article did not say that.
    My reply had to do with those effects on MOM and not on MAVEN. So my reply fits here.

    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    One year ago no study could have been done on the coma. Note when the study was published.
    That has nothing to do with what we are talking abou. That's a study about the affect on the atmosphere, not the ability for Mars orbiters to observe the encounter.

    The MOM people knew the comet was going to be there, they knew there might be some interaction, so they knew they were in position to study it. The study is yet to be done. The planning for it started over a year ago.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Exactly, you mentioned MOM and how something is going to be new to it. The article did not say that.
    My reply had to do with those effects on MOM and not on MAVEN. So my reply fits here.


    That has nothing to do with what we are talking abou. That's a study about the affect on the atmosphere, not the ability for Mars orbiters to observe the encounter.

    The MOM people knew the comet was going to be there, they knew there might be some interaction, so they knew they were in position to study it. The study is yet to be done. The planning for it started over a year ago.
    I do not see why you are geting so hot under the collar. May I point out one line from the new report -

    But perhaps the most interesting possibilities for observations of the event are still en route: India’s Mars Orbiter Mission and NASA’s MAVEN orbiter arrive just before the comet
    It talks of both the probes. One year ago they were more worried about what the comet might do to the probes. Now they are looking at how they may enhance the scientific knowledge
    with these two probes being in orbit around Mars. I agree Mavin with its range of instruments is better suited for the study, and that is why I highlighted the report in the Mavin thread. Is that wrong in your judgement?

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    I do not see why you are geting so hot under the collar.
    I'm not getting hot... I'm explaining my reasoning.
    You mentioned MOM, and explaining the correlation to the article seems to fit here...

    My point was that you are calling it a "new task". I am pointing out it was a task that was planned for a year ago by the MOM people.

    What's wrong with pointing out a MOM opportunity in the MOM thread? Like I pointed out, MOM may be in a better position for observations.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    I'm not getting hot... I'm explaining my reasoning.
    You mentioned MOM, and explaining the correlation to the article seems to fit here...

    My point was that you are calling it a "new task". I am pointing out it was a task that was planned for a year ago by the MOM people.

    What's wrong with pointing out a MOM opportunity in the MOM thread? Like I pointed out, MOM may be in a better position for observations.
    All of that because he used the word "new".


    For what it's worth, this is new to me.
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  6. #66
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    MOM to undergo a trajectory correction manoeuvre on June 11

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-...1-1226031.aspx

    This will be the second trajectory correction since the spacecraft moved out of the Earth's orbit on December 1 last year. Isro had initially planned four corrections during its journey to Mars. The manoeuvres are needed to keep the spacecraft on the required path. It is also essential for maintaining the required velocity.

  7. #67
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    trajectory correction manoeuvre carried out successfully. Now to wait for Sept. 24th to see if ISRO can pull it off and insert it into Mars orbit. Good luck MOM.

    http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/tra...cle6105205.ece

    ISRO Chairman K. Radhakrishnan said the TCM was “precisely done” and “we operated four out of 22 Newton thrusters for 16 seconds” which gave the spacecraft an incremental velocity of 1.574 metres a second. “Reviews are under way. All systems on the Mars Orbiter are normal,” Dr. Radhakrishnan said.

    “Everything went perfectly well,” said M. Annadurai, Programme Director, Indian Remote-sensing Satellites and Small Satellites Systems, ISRO. “We are happy because this is, in a way, a simulation for the crucial Mars Orbit Injection (MOI)” that would take place on September 24.

    “The MOI will be exactly similar to this except that we fired four small Newton thrusters today. But we will fire the 440-Newton liquid engine [propulsion system] of the spacecraft for the MOI,” he said.

  8. #68
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    It'll be a real feather in their cap if they pull it off on the first try, and a political boost for their manned program.

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  9. #69
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    MOM and MAVEN 100 million miles from Mars. Report in universetoday.com

    http://www.universetoday.com/112605/...d-nasas-maven/

    India’s inaugural voyager to the Red Planet, the Mars Orbiter Mission or MOM, has just celebrated 100 days and 100 million kilometers out from Mars on June 16, until the crucial Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI) engine firing that will culminate in a historic rendezvous on September 24, 2014.

    MOM is cruising right behind NASA’s MAVEN orbiter which celebrated 100 days out from Mars on Friday the 13th of June. MAVEN arrives about 48 hours ahead of MOM on September 21, 2014.

  10. #70
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    If MOM is successful on September 24, 2014 it will have company from another Indian satellite in a few years time.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...aign=TOI_AShow

    India is planning a "follow-on" mission to the Red Planet between 2017 and 2020 having a lot of scientific content, chairman of Isro K Radhakrishnan announced here on Thursday.

    Radhakrishnan said that the final decision will depend upon the success of the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) orbit insertion on September 24, 2014. The Isro chief announced this at the TIFR while addressing a large gathering of scientists and students from Kirti and Jai Hind Colleges.

    Pointing out that the current mission was mainly to demonstrate Isro's capability to execute the nail-biting orbit insertion, he described the second one as a scientific mission.

  11. #71
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    The Isro chief explained that for the September 24 orbit insertion, the challenges include the liquid apogee motor restarting after 300 days."If we are successful in the first attempt we will be the first country in the world to accomplish it and also the first Asian country to achieve it," he said.
    Only by a squeaker.

    The first US probes intended to orbit Mars were Mariners 8 and 9 (the previous ones were all fly-by missions). Both were intended as a pair of missions for the same launch window opportunity 5 months apart.
    Mariner 8 itself didn't fail, the launch rocket did.

    I thought the way the quote was worded was rather amusing. If it's the first in the world, then why wouldn't it be the first Asian country. Aren't they part of the world?

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Only by a squeaker.

    The first US probes intended to orbit Mars were Mariners 8 and 9 (the previous ones were all fly-by missions). Both were intended as a pair of missions for the same launch window opportunity 5 months apart.
    Mariner 8 itself didn't fail, the launch rocket did.

    I thought the way the quote was worded was rather amusing. If it's the first in the world, then why wouldn't it be the first Asian country. Aren't they part of the world?

    Maybe he means "first country to accomplish it [on the first try]" and the first Asian to achieve it [at all]".

    That's what I read the first time around, but after seeing your comment I wonder.
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  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    Maybe he means "first country to accomplish it [on the first try]" and the first Asian to achieve it [at all]".
    That's what I assume too. Plus, is the difference in accomplishing it and achieving it?
    I'm sure it's partly due to translation and partly as out of context.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    That's what I assume too. Plus, is the difference in accomplishing it and achieving it?
    I'm sure it's partly due to translation and partly as out of context.
    I found his word choice interesting too. In general I try to avoid repeating the same word, especially when writing. I would never say "I achieved this mark, then I achieved another mark, ..." I would look for synonyms or rephrase to avoid the repetition.

    Interestingly enough, in German they have no problem repeating the same word if it is properly used. That may stem from their "exact" minded attitude towards things and also their relatively thin Thesaurus. They never got the quantity of Latin based words that English got from French, so their total vocabulary is much smaller.
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  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Only by a squeaker.

    The first US probes intended to orbit Mars were Mariners 8 and 9 (the previous ones were all fly-by missions). Both were intended as a pair of missions for the same launch window opportunity 5 months apart.
    Mariner 8 itself didn't fail, the launch rocket did.

    I thought the way the quote was worded was rather amusing. If it's the first in the world, then why wouldn't it be the first Asian country. Aren't they part of the world?
    I interpret it as, India is the 1st country to successful inset a probe into Mars orbit on it's 1st try and the 1st Asian country to have a probe orbiting Mars.

    This is of course dependent on them succeeding on the 24th of September
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  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Only by a squeaker.

    The first US probes intended to orbit Mars were Mariners 8 and 9 (the previous ones were all fly-by missions). Both were intended as a pair of missions for the same launch window opportunity 5 months apart.
    Mariner 8 itself didn't fail, the launch rocket did.

    I thought the way the quote was worded was rather amusing. If it's the first in the world, then why wouldn't it be the first Asian country. Aren't they part of the world?
    A further question is why he doesn't consider the USSR to be a part of Asia. Their first attempts at reaching Mars orbit failed, but in November 27, 1971 their Mars 2 spacecraft was put into an orbit 1380 x 24,940 km
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  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    A further question is why he doesn't consider the USSR to be a part of Asia. Their first attempts at reaching Mars orbit failed, but in November 27, 1971 their Mars 2 spacecraft was put into an orbit 1380 x 24,940 km
    Semantics and nitpicking may abound here.
    But; It could be perceived as Moscow is in Europe even if the country spans both continents. So; it could be considered a European country with Asian lands.

    The other (remote) idea is that the USSR is Eurasian.

    Just think if they still had parts of Alaska.

  18. #78
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    Could it be racist? White people can't live in Asia?
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  19. #79
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    MOM in it's final lap

    http://www.financialexpress.com/news...1275814?rhnews

    In it's final lap, India's Mars Orbiter spacecraft will burn a bulk of the 290 kilograms of fuel left in its fuel-tanks, when it slows down and performs a crucial manoeuvre to enter the Martian orbit next month, ISRO officials said here today. Once placed in the orbit, the spacecraft is scheduled to scan and study the atmosphere of red-planet for a period of six months.

    "It is currently about 163 million kilometers away from Mars. It is travelling at a speed of 1.2 million kilometers per day. It is on schedule and on target. Originally we were planning to have a corrective manoeuvre on August 19. But in the current situation, we don't think it is necessary. So the next (trajectory) correction is scheduled for September 14 and on September 24, the orbiter is supposed to reach Mars and perform the manoeuvre to orbit the red planet,"

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    MOM has one more course correction (September 14 - see above) before it will meet its biggest challenge - to orbit Mars. But this is not last of the challenges it has to meet. On October 19 comet Siding Spring will be in the neighborhood. Even the smallest particle from the comet -- estimated to be about one-fiftieth of an inch (half a millimeter) across -- could cause significant damage to a spacecraft. This is a challenge but also a unique opportunity to study the comet as well.

    http://www.financialexpress.com/news...ctober/1276655

    The passage of a comet, Siding Spring, will be the first astronomical event that the Indian Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) spacecraft or 'Mangalyaan' will encounter once it reaches the red-planet next month. The comet that is scheduled to fly past the red planet on October 19 could pose a potential threat to the survival of the orbiter.

    "After the spacecraft is captured in the Mars' orbit, we will encounter the Siding Spring comet that will engulf Mars in October," said AS Kiran Kumar, director Space Applications Centre, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) while talking about the spacecraft that is scheduled to enter the orbit of Mars on September 24.

    In a spectacular event on October 19, the MOM will encounter comet Siding Spring, that will come closer to the Red planet than any recorded comet has ever passed Earth.

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    So it sounds like they are not taking precautions like the others are doing, and hoping for the best.

    I wonder how much safer MRO and MOO will be with the orbit adjusted to the far side for the pass. I'm sure there's no "safe" since the particle trail is probably vast.

  22. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    So it sounds like they are not taking precautions like the others are doing, and hoping for the best.

    I wonder how much safer MRO and MOO will be with the orbit adjusted to the far side for the pass. I'm sure there's no "safe" since the particle trail is probably vast.
    I think they are but that must be weighed with the amount of scientific information to be gained from observing and analyzing a comet at a close distance. This opportunity was a gift from god and should not be missed plus they would have about one months data on the Mars observations.

    Of course this is dependent on them successfully going into Mars orbit.

  23. #83
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    Another small step taken to ensure MOM does get inserted into Mars orbit.

    http://www.newindianexpress.com/nati...cle2368718.ece

    India's Mars Orbiter Mission's antenna is ready for the Mars Orbit Insertion with only 14 per cent of its journey to the red planet left to be covered.

    MOM successfully completed the characterisation of its Medium Gain Antenna, which will be used for communicating with earth during the critical Mars Orbit Insertion (MOI), ISRO said in a post on its Mars Orbiter Mission Facebook page.

  24. #84
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    An article that gives details of the MOM mission

    http://www.universetoday.com/114078/...l/#more-114078

    As of Aug. 22, 2014, the Mars Orbiter Mission, or MOM, was just 9 million kilometers away from Mars and the crucial Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI) engine firing that places India’s first interplanetary voyager into orbit around the 4th planet from the Sun.

    MOM was designed and developed by the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) at a cost of $69 Million and marks India’s maiden foray into interplanetary flight.

    So far it has traveled a total distance of 602 million km in its heliocentric arc towards Mars, says ISRO. It is currently 189 million km away from Earth. Round trip radio signals communicating with MOM take 20 minutes and 47 seconds.

    After streaking through space for some ten and a half months, the 1,350 kilogram (2,980 pound) MOM probe will fire its 440 Newton liquid fueled main engine to brake into orbit around the Red Planet on September 24, 2014 – where she will study the atmosphere and sniff for signals of methane.
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    The performance of ISRO and MOM have been most impressive so far. If they get into orbit, remain functional and get some great comet pix on their first try some folks are going to be so jealous

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    More information on MOM especially on its main engine.

    http://www.spaceflight101.com/mars-o...n-updates.html

    The moment of truth for the Mars Orbiter will be the ignition of the Liquid Apogee Motor for the insertion burn. For the Mars Orbiter Mission, the single main engine is sitting idle for 297 days between the Trans-Martian Insertion Burn performed on November 30, 2013. This is the longest interval between LAM firings ever - the engine is usually employed on Geostationary Satellites that use it over a period of days or weeks to achieve their planned orbit.

    The Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter flew a version of LAM that was certified for 30 days, but successfully fired 209 days into the mission when the craft raised its orbit around the Moon. Chandrayaan-1 performed a total of eleven LAM burns over the course of its mission, for MOM, the Mars Orbit Insertion Maneuver will be the eighth burn.

    To facilitate the long interval between LAM firings and increase the probability of success of the MOI maneuver, MOM’s propulsion system features a number of modifications. These modifications include an additional set of propellant lines and associated valves that feed propellant from the tanks to the main engine. The propellant system used for the orbit raising burns and the TMI burn was isolated by initiating pyro valves early in the cruise phase. This prevents the corrosive propellants from causing propellant leaks since MOM does not have a large margin of propellant. For MOI, the second set of propellant lines will be used, but the engine will still be the same.

  27. #87
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    MOM has now completed 90% ot it's journey to Mars. India has so far spent Rs.349 crore on its Mars Orbiter Mission of the total Rs.450 crore budget on the project.

    http://indianspacestation.com/resear...-to-red-planet

    “The spacecraft has completed 90 percent of its journey to Mars. On September 14, its trajectory would be corrected,” a senior official of Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), was quoted as saying to IANS.


    He said the spacecraft is slated to enter into the Mars orbit on September 24.

    On September 24, the manoeuvring of the spacecraft will begin around 7.30 am. And the speed of the spacecraft will be reduced from the current velocity so that the Mars Orbiter enters into the orbit.

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    This is great. I am rooting for ISRO to make this successful orbit insertion.
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    India plans to test fire the MOM engine for 5 seconds 48 hours (22 September) before crucial orbit insertion.

    http://www.indianspacestation.com/re...n-september-22

    Isro chairman K Radhakrishnan told TOI on Friday that should there be a problem with the motor, the space agency will resort to its 'Plan B' for the Mars orbit insertion. This backup plan involves firing of the eight 22 Newton thrusters for the insertion.


    When asked whether the mission profile would change in case Isro has to fall back on its 'Plan B', Radhakrishnan acknowledged that "it will not be the original mission", but it will mark the end of an uncertain period. He said 'Plan B' would essentially be a "salvaging exercise".

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