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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #10891
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Think she'd like to put the tooth back in perhaps? I believe I have it somewhere; it had a gold crown which is worth a few dollars!
    Sort of the opposite of a manufacturer's recall notice. "I'm sorry, but we need to reinstall the defective part".
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  2. #10892
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    I recently bought a copy of US General Omar Bradley's personal account of World War 2 in Europe called A Soldier's Story. I found the book at a local thrift store for a cost of $1. The cover is somewhat tattered but the book is in very good shape. When I brought it home and started flipping through the pages a small paper dropped out; it was a receipt from Book of the Month Club for $4.25. Now, the book was published in 1951 and I think this is a first printing, albeit of little value. Mostly I was curious if the paper was from 1951. So after a little internet digging - yup. A Soldier's Story was on the Book of the Month Club titles list in 1951. Which means that the book and the receipt are both older than me and may have belonged to the original owner. Who I thank for giving me the chance to add it to my collection.

  3. #10893
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    It's that time of year when bags of fresh vegetables mysteriously appear on my my doorstep.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  4. #10894
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    It's that time of year when bags of fresh vegetables mysteriously appear on my my doorstep.
    Somebodies garden is doing well I guess.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  5. #10895
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    I recently bought a copy of US General Omar Bradley's personal account of World War 2 in Europe called A Soldier's Story. I found the book at a local thrift store for a cost of $1. The cover is somewhat tattered but the book is in very good shape. When I brought it home and started flipping through the pages a small paper dropped out; it was a receipt from Book of the Month Club for $4.25. Now, the book was published in 1951 and I think this is a first printing, albeit of little value. Mostly I was curious if the paper was from 1951. So after a little internet digging - yup. A Soldier's Story was on the Book of the Month Club titles list in 1951. Which means that the book and the receipt are both older than me and may have belonged to the original owner. Who I thank for giving me the chance to add it to my collection.
    I was hoping you were going to say the paper had General Bradley's signature on it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    It's that time of year when bags of fresh vegetables mysteriously appear on my my doorstep.
    Mostly zucchinis, I expect. Although I planted two zuke plants several weeks ago and have so far manage to get one that's four inches long; and has been for the past week!
    Trivial stuff that bugs me: I am totally unable to learn the correct spelling of "zucchini".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #10896
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Mostly zucchinis, I expect.
    It’s tomatoes this year, although zucchini would be a good guess.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  7. #10897
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    Zuchinni prices have been an "issue" here lately.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/122...o-for-zucchini

    Amazing for something so relatively easy to grow.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  8. #10898
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Zuchinni prices have been an "issue" here lately.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/122...o-for-zucchini

    Amazing for something so relatively easy to grow.
    Build yourself a greenhouse, mate!
    We won't be growing many in February, either. But I'd bet they won't cost that much even then.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #10899
    Speaking of zuchinni, I was just in the garden and I guess at least one zuchinni plant survived.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  10. #10900
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    Our cukes have been having a very good year. We also have a feral decorative squash (the seed must have been in some of our compost) and it is slowly trying to take over its corner of the garden. Tomato plants are doing well, though we have only just started getting fruit.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  11. #10901
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    I've recently been reading We Landed By Moonlight, an excellent autobiographical account of the activities of 161 (Special Duties) Squadron, RAF, during the Second World War. They flew secret nocturnal ferry flights in and out of Occupied France, in black-painted Lysanders and Hudsons, landing in farmers' fields marked by nothing more than three flashlights.

    I'm amused by the cover of the Crécy revised edition I own:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    It's a composite image, using two photographs to produce an atmospheric impression of a Lysander landing by moonlight.

    Unfortunately, the Lysander is sporting SEAC roundels and flashes. It's this Lysander, in fact, which flew Special Duties in Burma, not France.

    This pales into insignificance whe you look at the Moon, however.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    First of all, it's mirror-reflected. It should look like this:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Secondly, it's not the Moon as seen from Earth--it's a spacecraft view taken from somewhere in the vicinity of 60 degrees east lunar longitude. Almost certainly an early return-trajectory photograph from one of the Apollo missions, and most probably AS11-44-6667.
    That Lysander's a long way from home.

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #10902
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    There apparently being a shortage of coinage in the USA just now, I decided to take my accumulated bag of change from the nightstand and run it through the Coinstar machine. First, however, I took a look through it to see if there was anything interesting, particularly wheat cents. I did find a few coins from the 1960's and 1970's, and then thought "Oh, someone's given me a Canadian quarter!" But it wasn't; it was a ten-cent piece from Australia!

    A few years ago I found a Greek Euro in my change. I wonder where it is!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #10903
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I've recently been reading We Landed By Moonlight, an excellent autobiographical account of the activities of 161 (Special Duties) Squadron, RAF, during the Second World War. They flew secret nocturnal ferry flights in and out of Occupied France, in black-painted Lysanders and Hudsons, landing in farmers' fields marked by nothing more than three flashlights.

    I'm amused by the cover of the Crécy revised edition I own:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	we landed by moonlight.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	40.4 KB 
ID:	25442
    It's a composite image, using two photographs to produce an atmospheric impression of a Lysander landing by moonlight.

    Unfortunately, the Lysander is sporting SEAC roundels and flashes. It's this Lysander, in fact, which flew Special Duties in Burma, not France.

    This pales into insignificance whe you look at the Moon, however.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	moon.jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	26.2 KB 
ID:	25443
    First of all, it's mirror-reflected. It should look like this:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	moonref.jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	27.1 KB 
ID:	25444
    Secondly, it's not the Moon as seen from Earth--it's a spacecraft view taken from somewhere in the vicinity of 60 degrees east lunar longitude. Almost certainly an early return-trajectory photograph from one of the Apollo missions, and most probably AS11-44-6667.
    That Lysander's a long way from home.

    Grant Hutchison
    Weird, I can’t imagine it being easier to find an image of the moon from space than one from Earth.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
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  14. #10904
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post

    It's a composite image, using two photographs to produce an atmospheric impression of a Lysander landing by moonlight.

    Unfortunately, the Lysander is sporting SEAC roundels and flashes. It's this Lysander, in fact, which flew Special Duties in Burma, not France.
    Perhaps they did the wrong research...

    I've seen that one more than once. There was kid in one of my upper level courses on Latin America that managed to do the most perfectly wrong research. He somehow mingled Tupac Amaru, the world famous last monarch of the Neo-Inca state with the little known rapper named Tupac Shakur. He gave this presentation where he highlighted parts of the monarch's life with lyrics from the rapper. It was actually a perfect presentation. It was like poetry and history at the same.

    Things when haywire when he attributed the rapper's lyrics to the king. The professor what completely baffled. She though that the student was doing a special kind of plagiarism where he attributed fictional song lyrics to an Inca king. However, she also believed him to be some sort of savant with lyrics. The student didn't know what the heck she was talking about.

    The ironic thing is Tupac Amura Shakur took the kings name as his own because he knew the history and considered himself to be a rebel in a lost cause. The student and the professor each knew of one "Tupac" but not the other.
    Solfe

  15. #10905
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Weird, I can’t imagine it being easier to find an image of the moon from space than one from Earth.
    If you search for public domain photographs of the moon, you do tend to get shunted towards NASA images. (I've been through this process looking for images for the blog.) For me, having a full moon that looked like a real full moon would trump any slight aesthetic considerations, but some graphic designers think differently. And I really don't understand the mirror-reversal thing, which turns up fairly often under odd circumstances--I've occasionally spotted mirror-reversed writing in street scenes, for instance. My working hypothesis has usually been that it's an attempt to defeat copyright searches on-line, but I've no great confidence in that.

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #10906
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Perhaps they did the wrong research...
    Nice idea, but I think it's just because if you fly solo secret missions at night in a black aircraft, then you leave very few in-flight photographs in the public record. The contemporary 161 Sq. photographs are either group photographs with visiting dignitaries standing in front of a parked aircraft, or of crashed aircraft.
    In the latest edition of the book, Crécy have changed to a modern in-flight photograph of the Lysander in the Shuttleworth Collection--it actually flew in Canada, but it has been restored and painted in early 161 Sq. markings and livery. And they've depicted it as if landing in a poppy field, which is a nice touch. (There are memorials in meadows all over northern and western France, marking the particular fields used by 161 Sq. when they did pick-ups and deliveries for the French Resistance.)

    Grant Hutchison

  17. #10907
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    This superyacht concept amused me. It’s basically a science fiction starship on the ocean, right down to the shuttle (helicopter) bay. It actually looks too busy to me. Naturally, this isn’t for mere millionaires. Anyway, here it is:

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/f...out/index.html

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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  18. #10908
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    I'm amused by Motor Yacht A, which is clearly based on Stingray. Except naffer.

    In other news, my local newspaper continues to amuse with the surreal headlines it puts on newsagents' A-boards. Today's offering is "HAMMER THUG PESTERED EX". Somehow, the verb to "pester" sits uneasily next to "hammer thug".

    Grant Hutchison

  19. #10909
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    What is "naffer"?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  20. #10910
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    What is "naffer"?
    Naff, naffer, naffest.
    naff (a.) slang.
    (næf)
    [Origin unknown]
    Unfashionable, outmoded, or vulgar; unselfconsciously lacking style, socially inept; also, worthless, faulty, ‘dud’.

    Oxford English Dictionary
    Grant Hutchison

  21. #10911
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    This superyacht concept amused me. It’s basically a science fiction starship on the ocean, right down to the shuttle (helicopter) bay. It actually looks too busy to me. Naturally, this isn’t for mere millionaires. Anyway, here it is:

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/f...out/index.html
    Those photos literally hurt my eyes.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  22. #10912
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'm amused by Motor Yacht A, which is clearly based on Stingray. Except naffer.
    The owner supposedly named it “A” because he wanted to be first in the registry, which is some next-level rich jerk behavior.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  23. #10913
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    This superyacht concept amused me. It’s basically a science fiction starship on the ocean, right down to the shuttle (helicopter) bay. It actually looks too busy to me. Naturally, this isn’t for mere millionaires. Anyway, here it is:

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/f...out/index.html
    100m? Pah! There's a bigger one visiting Seattle right now!

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'm amused by Motor Yacht A, which is clearly based on Stingray. Except naffer.

    Grant Hutchison
    I must remember "naffer"! Looks a bit like the US Navy's Zumwalt Class Destroyer. A class of three ships with a hyperexpensive gun system for which no ammunition actually exists, as it was going to cost several million dollars a round.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #10914
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Trivial stuff that bugs me: I am totally unable to learn the correct spelling of "zucchini".
    Courgette. Glad I could help.
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  25. #10915
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    The owner supposedly named it “A” because he wanted to be first in the registry, which is some next-level rich jerk behavior.
    And the next one will name his the "1A", etc.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  26. #10916
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    And the next one will name his the "1A", etc.
    Melnichenko's next one was Sailing Yacht A. Motor Yacht A was actually up for sale when I saw it a few years ago. For some reason I didn't put in a bid.

    Grant Hutchison

  27. #10917
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Melnichenko's next one was Sailing Yacht A. Motor Yacht A was actually up for sale when I saw it a few years ago. For some reason I didn't put in a bid.

    Grant Hutchison
    I didn’t think it was possible to make a sailboat so ugly. A sail canoe is better looking.


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  28. #10918
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I didn’t think it was possible to make a sailboat so ugly. A sail canoe is better looking.
    Philippe Starck has a kind of militaristic design ethos that I find a bit comic. But a lot of people like it.

    Grant Hutchison

  29. #10919
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    100m? Pah! There's a bigger one visiting Seattle right now!


    I must remember "naffer"! Looks a bit like the US Navy's Zumwalt Class Destroyer. A class of three ships with a hyperexpensive gun system for which no ammunition actually exists, as it was going to cost several million dollars a round.
    The only Super-yacht I have been on was owned by the Sultan of Brunei at that time close to the richest man in the world. It was built in Western Australia and had come back to the builder, Austal the same company that has built some of the U.S. Navy 'Littoral combat ships, for some modifications - basically to make the Air Conditioning colder. Alas, I was only on board for official purposes but it was interesting to have a look at how the other .00001 percent live. He did have separate cabins for both of his then wives.

  30. #10920
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Those photos literally hurt my eyes.
    The lead photo has a man standing at window in a pose that Jean Luc Picard strike on Star Trek. Unfortunately, he is off to the far right side and it looks more like he is urinating out the window than looking out the window.
    Solfe

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