Page 380 of 385 FirstFirst ... 280330370378379380381382 ... LastLast
Results 11,371 to 11,400 of 11530

Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #11371
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North Tonawanda, NY
    Posts
    3,922
    It is "thermo"... which is a bit odd because it's imported from Greek, and Latin already had its own words for "hot". I guess they figured that, culturally, there was some difference between a Greek hot food place and a Roman one.

  2. #11372
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,670
    Mouse got out yesterday. This morning, he was standing in the front yard, whining. Even when I came outside, he didn't come to me. He just stood there whining until I came over, picked him up, and took him inside. I suspect he's not a great hunter and was hungry.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  3. #11373
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,666
    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    One of the cable channels we get has a show called "Living Alaska." It's a reality show where they show people who are wanting to move to Alaska, and the various properties they look at, and then ends with them deciding which property they're going to buy. I don't see the appeal, personally, but my wife watches it sometimes.

    At any rate, the amusing thing is that we caught the end of an episode where the property which the family ended up deciding to purchase was referred to as "the Peters Creek house."

    I was like, "Hey, I know that guy!"
    Too funny. I'm not the biggest fan of reality TV although I did watch "Alaska State Troopers" from time to time, especially the episode focused on the wildlife troopers. Never caught "Alaska Living" and never heard a peep about them filming anything out here but then, Peters Creek is divided by a highway into what we locally refer to as mountainside, and oceanside. I'm on the former, while the more expensive homes are generally on the latter.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  4. #11374
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,149
    My Alaska road atlas shows another Peters Creek in Alaska, west of Talkeetna, and for some reason prominently marked on the overview map on the back of the atlas. I don't know what goes on there--on Google Earth it looks like just one large building and a scatter of smaller ones.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #11375
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,666
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    My Alaska road atlas shows another Peters Creek in Alaska, west of Talkeetna, and for some reason prominently marked on the overview map on the back of the atlas. I don't know what goes on there--on Google Earth it looks like just one large building and a scatter of smaller ones.
    Yes and there was also a bit of confusion about it in the early days of online map sites like MapQuest, Google Maps, et al. Back then, searching for "peters creek ak" was most likely to locate that place west of Talkeetna. Turns out "Peters Creek" is/was an alternate name for Petersville, a Census Designated Place that's very small, indeed. There's also another Peters Creek that runs by/through it. They eventually got it sorted and nowadays, the same search puts a pin in my neck of the woods and only there.

    Edit to add: As for what they do there: historically, it's a mining area and I think small mining interests and individual claimholders still work the area. I also believe that both places/creeks were named for one Henry Peters, an early prospector, among other things...I think.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2020-Dec-27 at 11:54 PM.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  6. #11376
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,666
    It also amuses me to note that Bird Creek connects to Peters Creek...and there's another Bird Creek southeast of Anchorage that empties into Turnagain Arm. Evidently, early explorers and settlers ran out of names for all there is up here and had to recycle some.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  7. #11377
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    It is "thermo"... which is a bit odd because it's imported from Greek, and Latin already had its own words for "hot". I guess they figured that, culturally, there was some difference between a Greek hot food place and a Roman one.
    We have Chinese and Mexican and Italian restaurants in the US, so why not a Greek restaurant in a Roman town?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  8. #11378
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    We have Chinese and Mexican and Italian restaurants in the US, so why not a Greek restaurant in a Roman town?
    I think there's a pretty close analogy with the word café in English--it's a place you can buy hot drinks and snacks, and we've adopted the name used by the French, because at some point we wanted to affect a bit of French style (even though coffee-house culture actually got to England before it started in France).
    The Romans borrowed a lot of words from the Greeks, for whom they had a bit of cultural envy, but because of the way Latin works they had to tweak the endings so that they would fit into a standard Latin declension. So Greek thermopolion became Latin second-declension neuter thermopolium.

    Grant Hutchison

  9. #11379
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,640
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Ours seems to favor responding to male voices over female. Not shocking for a Silicon Valley tech-bro product.
    This is total speculation on my part, but lower tones, having a longer wavelength, tend to travel further than higher sounds. But I think you are usually fairly close to it, so that's probably not the right explanation.
    As above, so below

  10. #11380
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,640
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    I see what you did there.
    I had missed that, but hey, it brings back memories.
    As above, so below

  11. #11381
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,640
    Quote Originally Posted by Selenite View Post
    Maybe the horse means they have a drive-thru service.
    Trot-through service?
    As above, so below

  12. #11382
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,640
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think there's a pretty close analogy with the word café in English--it's a place you can buy hot drinks and snacks, and we've adopted the name used by the French, because at some point we wanted to affect a bit of French style (even though coffee-house culture actually got to England before it started in France).
    And we have other restaurant types as well where we use a borrowed term: trattoria, bistro, brasserie.

    Though of course, come to think of it, the term restaurant itself is a borrowed term...
    As above, so below

  13. #11383
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    681
    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Trot-through service?
    A concept that survives in the former Roman province of Dacia (Romania) to this day.


  14. #11384
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,149
    But it doesn't work in Suffolk, apparently.

    Grant Hutchison

  15. #11385
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    681
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    But it doesn't work in Suffolk, apparently.
    That figures. I hear the Boudicea-burger didn't sit too well with Iceni tribe either.

  16. #11386
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,549
    This discovery at Pompeii is fascinating, despite it leading to some very bad jokes on here When we were there in the 1970's I was surprised about how much of the city was yet to be uncovered - it is a huge site. There is still lots to be excavated. We can just hope for more, and possibly even more interesting, finds in the future.

  17. #11387
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    681
    I remember when I was there with a Trafalgar tour group in 2002, they showed us a stone counter where the guide said the Roman equivalent of fast food was sold. However, it didn't have the lovely preserved paintings on the sides. At least not as far as I can recall. What I do recall was that there were some discarded plastic bottles and trash in those openings which I thought was rather sad.



    Sorry for the poor quality of the picture, I didn't have a digital camera yet.

  18. #11388
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Yes and there was also a bit of confusion about it in the early days of online map sites like MapQuest, Google Maps, et al. Back then, searching for "peters creek ak" was most likely to locate that place west of Talkeetna. Turns out "Peters Creek" is/was an alternate name for Petersville, a Census Designated Place that's very small, indeed. There's also another Peters Creek that runs by/through it. They eventually got it sorted and nowadays, the same search puts a pin in my neck of the woods and only there.

    Edit to add: As for what they do there: historically, it's a mining area and I think small mining interests and individual claimholders still work the area. I also believe that both places/creeks were named for one Henry Peters, an early prospector, among other things...I think.
    The community I live i called Mayfield, and like the Peter Creek in Alaska there is another Mayfield in NB. One year while doing the phonebook I had to get a package sent to the office so they bosses could check up on my work and to do this they had to send a courier to pick up the package, the first day the went to the other one which is an hour and half away. By the time they figured things out it was almost quitting time. The next pick up day was two days away.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  19. #11389
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,480
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    It is "thermo"... which is a bit odd because it's imported from Greek, and Latin already had its own words for "hot". I guess they figured that, culturally, there was some difference between a Greek hot food place and a Roman one.
    Perhaps T’ermopolium?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  20. #11390
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,532
    Also, "caldarium" was already taken as a place for a hot bath!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #11391
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    "Hot-a-torium"
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  22. #11392
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,149
    Greek thermopolion comes from thermos, "hot", and poleo, "to sell". It's not a hot place, but a place where hot stuff is sold. For the Romans, thermopolium would have been an obvious foreign import.

    Grant Hutchison

  23. #11393
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,391
    This is carry over from the OTB COVID-19 Thread. I said:

    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    My wife got the vaccine the other day. No point in asking about it. She had the first dose then worked a full day today (edit - I lost track of time, this would have been shot on Monday, work on Tuesday). As near as I can tell, work has the same side effects after the vaccine as before: tired, cranky, just wants dinner and a pony.
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Separately! SEPARATELY!

    No, no, no, no. Before this mess, we were planning a vacation to a Louisianan farm that offered picnic horseback riding. She wants them together, she wants to horse to join us for dinner.

    When Kitty moved out of her parents house, she found a horseshoe. She told me all about her horse. During a particularly touching story about her horse Abby, her mom chimed in and said, "You know, that wasn't your horse. We just leased it for a few years." My wife cried for days. Kitty has never recovered. It's her game plan to get a farm and a stable and live in the stable with her horse.
    Solfe

  24. #11394
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post

    No, no, no, no. Before this mess, we were planning a vacation to a Louisianan farm that offered picnic horseback riding. She wants them together, she wants to horse to join us for dinner.
    But just to be clear, not... in the Dracula sense of "join you for dinner".
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  25. #11395
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    8,773
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    We have Chinese and Mexican and Italian restaurants in the US, so why not a Greek restaurant in a Roman town?
    Pompeii was very heavily influenced by the Greeks. It was, after all, part of Magna Graecia until the Romans took over.

  26. #11396
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,670
    Last night, Irene brought her tablet to me to be charged, and I discovered that the glass had been shattered some time in the preceding 24 hours. Fortunately, it's got a two-year no-questions-asked warranty (sold as a children's item), so I just messaged Amazon to get it replaced. This in and of itself obviously does not amuse me. What does is that the adjective being used by the customer service person who handled it to describe her old tablet is "defeated."
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  27. #11397
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,738
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Last night, Irene brought her tablet to me to be charged, and I discovered that the glass had been shattered some time in the preceding 24 hours. Fortunately, it's got a two-year no-questions-asked warranty (sold as a children's item), so I just messaged Amazon to get it replaced. This in and of itself obviously does not amuse me. What does is that the adjective being used by the customer service person who handled it to describe her old tablet is "defeated."
    Sounds about right. Child vs device, device usually loses.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  28. #11398
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,549
    This is something that could have gone into the "bugs you" thread but it amuses me how much it really bugs my wife. The day after Christmas - called Boxing Day here - fresh Hot Cross Buns and Easter Eggs appeared on Supermarket shelves. I bought some marked-down buns today partly to eat but also to tease my wife. She ate one but did indulge in some mutterings about 'out of season' foods.

  29. #11399
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,532
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    This is something that could have gone into the "bugs you" thread but it amuses me how much it really bugs my wife. The day after Christmas - called Boxing Day here - fresh Hot Cross Buns and Easter Eggs appeared on Supermarket shelves. I bought some marked-down buns today partly to eat but also to tease my wife. She ate one but did indulge in some mutterings about 'out of season' foods.
    In the USA we have to get through Valentine's Day first. The big candy display appeared on Dec 26. Which is not called Boxing Day here.

    We're going to leave our Christmas tree up and redecorate it for Valentine's Day, I think. The lights make me happy.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #11400
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,391
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    But just to be clear, not... in the Dracula sense of "join you for dinner".
    Ah...no. But, if I went lame and a horse went lame, one of us would be put down and it wouldn't be the horse.
    Solfe

Similar Threads

  1. Really trivial stuff that bugs you
    By Trebuchet in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 14136
    Last Post: Yesterday, 04:44 PM
  2. Trivial coincidences from everyday life.
    By Buttercup in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 171
    Last Post: 2012-Nov-02, 09:08 PM
  3. Trivial Relief:
    By Moose in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 2006-Jul-19, 01:20 PM
  4. Bad Astronomy in Trivial Pursuit, Genus 5 Edition
    By tracer in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 2005-May-12, 01:52 PM
  5. Trivial lawsuits are stupid, but listen to my story...
    By Brady Yoon in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 2005-Apr-28, 01:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •