Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Telrad Finder

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    105

    Telrad Finder

    What would be the pro's and cons of the Telrad Finder ? I've heard alot of good review on it.

  2. 2012-Jun-16, 08:02 PM

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,275
    I know of no cons other than maybe bulk on a small scope. Only finder I use on all my scopes (3" to 14"). Once you learn the reticule scale in relation to your star atlas it becomes far faster, at least for me, than any other finder. Do get the mod that allows you to pulse the reticule. If you live in a high humidity area the flip open dew cover is a necessity as well but that's true of all finders many of which don't shield the eyepiece.

    When I did the Herschel 400 back in the early 80's I found every one in less than a minute counting time both at the atlas and scope. No way I could do that with any other finder. You won't see them in the finder, just the field stars around them. Picture the atlas stars in relation to the reticule and your star hop to them then duplicate at the Telrad. Takes longer to explain than actually do it once you get the hang of it. Does have a learning curve but so do all other finders.

    If set up equatorially use a right angle sweep from a nearby naked eye star easily seen in the Telrad. You'll quickly learn to mentally determine the number eyepiece fields you need to move on each axis with a quick glance at the star atlas. I use both methods depending on the scope's mount.

    Rick

  4. #3
    LookingSkyward's Avatar
    LookingSkyward is offline Honored Member
    Forum Welcomer Emeritus
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    3,892
    I've used my Telrad for something over a year now - I don't see any downside. This was the best accessory purchase I made for my dob.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2
    My only drawback with the Telrad is that it becomes almost impossible to use in a heavily light polluted area as the surrounding lighting washes out all but the brightest planets and the moon (remember, the view you see in the Telrad is a lot dimmer than what you see in the sky). When in a heavily light polluted area, use the finderscope. When at the dark site, I almost exclusively use the Telrad except for some DSOs. On most DSO's I still use the finderscope as it gives some magnification and increases the amount of light you see, which is important for DSOs (but to be truthful, I usually get "close" first with the TelRad if the DSO is close to a known star.)

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    WA state, USA - Seattle area
    Posts
    2,900
    I've used a Telrad as my sole finder for nearly a decade. In fact, the first thing I did when I got my 10" is to remove the finderscope and replace it with a Telrad. I personally find Telrads to be much more usable than a finderscope. I have little trouble locating objects with just a good star map (Orion deep sky map) and star hopping or just being able to point my scope close to the target via the Telrad. In fact, I'm pretty good at getting the object in the eyepeice field with just the map and a Telrad to get me to the right part of the sky. I'd be lost trying to use a finderscope.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    684
    When in a heavily light polluted area, use the finderscope. When at the dark site, I almost exclusively use the Telrad
    That sounds like you have both fitted to the same scope. Is that right? Is there a way to fit two different sorts of finder to one scope? Sounds like a useful thing so that you can use the Telrad in good seeing and a magnifying finderscope for when the seeing is not so good or the target stars are dim.

  8. #7
    LookingSkyward's Avatar
    LookingSkyward is offline Honored Member
    Forum Welcomer Emeritus
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    3,892
    I have both the telrad and a finder scope on my 6" dob, and yes, I like having the finder. If I could only have one it would be the telrad, though.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA (near Washington, DC)
    Posts
    9,036
    In a dark sky, I can point within 1/2 degree or better with the Telrad. If severe light pollution makes the visible stars too sparse for that, I would need a good finder scope in addition.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,275
    While the scopes at the public observatory I was at for 27 years have both optical and Telrad finders and is located well within the city limits of a large town our operators would be lost without the Telrad even in bright skys. If the skies are too bright for finding an object then they are also too bright to show it so we never found the skies to be a limiting factor. But then we don't try to show the public 13th magnitude faint fuzzies from our light polluted location. Though I did that from my house for years with my 10" f/8 at 300x and up. Still the Telrad was the only finder I used. For reasons I never fathomed, Cave put only a 42mm finder on the scope. High quality Unitron unit but worthless compared to the Telrad in my opinion.

    Rick

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    684
    So is the Telrad finder significantly better than a "red dot finder"? The latter came with my NexStar SE - a zero magnification finder that superimposes a red dot on the sky.

    I do like the red dot finder but sometimes feel I'd prefer a more conventional finderscope (in addition to, rather than instead of). If the Telrad is better than a red dot finder, I'd consider upgrading. But ideally I'd like to fit both to the scope but I'm not sure if that's possible.

    Is there some sort of double finder mount available? I've seen a Celestron finderscope with a quick-release fitting so is there some way to easily swap finderscopes without having to realign them?

    Spike
    Last edited by Sp1ke; 2012-Jun-26 at 10:19 AM. Reason: Missed Q mark.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,275
    Greatly superior in my opinion but bulkier, especially if you get the option to blink it as well as control brightness. Reticle gives scale which is missing from red dot finders making it harder to determine where unseen objects are in the star field you do see. Relates well to most medium (inner ring) and low power (outer ring) eyepieces. Telrad base is separate and left on when the finder is removed. Holds alignment when reinstalled. Not exactly quick release, two thumb screws hold it in alignment and to the base. We left the optical finders on as well. Both easily fit on any scope but small refractors at the same time.

    Rick

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3
    I tend to use both a finderscope and a telrad. It just depends on the viewing conditions and the precision needed. A "Rigel QuikFinder" works rather well on a larger Dobsonian.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    684
    Sorry about the delay in replying. I appreciate all the useful info that you've all provided.

    I would like to clarify the various responses about using both a finderscope and a telrad. How do you fit both to one scope? My red dot finder fits directly onto a base on my scope so I presume I could swap it for a magnifying finderscope but I can't see how I could mount both types at the same time. (If I swap the finder, I'd have to re-align it each time.)

    Is there a way to have a red-dot/telrad finder as well as an optical finderscope fitted to a scope (specifically a NexStar 8 SE)?

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA (near Washington, DC)
    Posts
    9,036
    Quote Originally Posted by Sp1ke View Post
    Sorry about the delay in replying. I appreciate all the useful info that you've all provided.

    I would like to clarify the various responses about using both a finderscope and a telrad. How do you fit both to one scope? My red dot finder fits directly onto a base on my scope so I presume I could swap it for a magnifying finderscope but I can't see how I could mount both types at the same time. (If I swap the finder, I'd have to re-align it each time.)

    Is there a way to have a red-dot/telrad finder as well as an optical finderscope fitted to a scope (specifically a NexStar 8 SE)?
    That would depend on what kind of tools you have and how handy you are with them. I have drilled and tapped additional holes in the flanges of my old Celestron 8 to mount additional accessories. If I did not have the necessary tools for that, I might try mounting the Telrad on the tube with double-stick foam tape. That stuff can carry the weight, and the dimensional stability would be adequate for the naked-eye tolerances of the Telrad.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    684
    OK, so it's a DIY solution. That's fine - I didn't want to start drilling holes all over the shop then find I could have bought an off-the-shelf solution that was neater. I did originally hope there was some sort of twin mount that fitted to the standard finderscope holes then had two arms which themselves had a standard base for a finderscope. Then you could easily fit and use two finders. Since such a device wasn't obviously available, I then thought I must be trying to do something stupid or pointless.

    Thanks everyone for all the advice. I'll have a think about whether I upgrade to a telrad finder, swap to a magnifying finderscope or make my own fitting to use both.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,275
    The Telrad comes with two sided tape that holds it very securely to the scope. Mine's been on 20 years that way. No holes needed. You can buy separate bases and use one Telrad on several scopes. I have ten scopes but only 2 Telrads. Lots of bases however. All held by that tape. I have -40 degree winters and over 100 degree summer days with lots of dew and frost. Never had one come off yet.

    Rick

Similar Threads

  1. Aligning a Star Finder
    By TheWagles@aol.com in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 2009-Jan-01, 01:40 AM
  2. Finder Scopes
    By George in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 2006-Aug-28, 02:05 PM
  3. Telrad Tip
    By perfessor in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2006-Apr-10, 01:06 PM
  4. Is a Telrad Finder enough
    By thebach in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 2004-Apr-10, 07:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •