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Thread: Things I've always wondered

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    I come from an Italian-American family, and married into a second. I've never seen a single Italian crying that the food was "just like momma used to make." I only see that in particularly offensive movies.
    Are you actually offended by the stereotype?

  2. #62
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    If I leave the house at 7.05am or earlier, I can walk to the train station at a leisurely rate. But I never do. Why?

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Beardsley
    If I leave the house at 7.05am or earlier, I can walk to the train station at a leisurely rate. But I never do. Why?
    Could it be that you prefer to drive?

  4. #64
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    I have long wondered if there are specific tests we could do to find out if reality is the ultimate reality or if its just a simulation.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Beardsley View Post
    If I leave the house at 7.05am or earlier, I can walk to the
    train station at a leisurely rate. But I never do. Why?
    Undoubtedly not as bad as me when I was taking the
    city bus to school. I knew the trip took 45 minutes, so
    I left 45 minutes before I needed to arrive -- then waited
    for the bus for fifteen minutes and got to school 15 minutes
    late. I paid no attention to the actual schedule. (Because
    nobody told me to. They must have assumed I'd already
    figured that out for myself.) If I'd left ten minutes earlier I
    would have caught the bus immediately and arrived ten
    minutes before classes started. Which might have been
    easier if I'd gone to sleep two hours earlier the night before.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Beardsley View Post
    Are you actually offended by the stereotype?
    It's mildly offputting, but it's hardly the most offensive I've seen. Mostly though, it tends to appear in productions that rely heavily on other more offensive Italian stereotypes.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  7. #67
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    Musing upon FarmMarsNow's post #64.....

    We live second by second by second with no pause option.
    Our past follows us and we can plan stuff in the future.....
    but we only actually live on a second by second by second basis.

    (Sorry, I had a moment there).

  8. #68
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    how many helium balloons would it take to lift a human of the ground?

  9. #69
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    I used to wonder if you had an infinite number of lines, each made up of an infinite number of dots, and each dot on every line was connected to every other dot by a squiggle, do you have more lines, dots or squiggles?

    I was very particular about the punctuation above and hope I got it right. I used to have this reoccurring nightmare about the above and I was not allowed to visit dots that were not connected by squiggles.

    Strange dream, I know.
    Solfe

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Beardsley View Post
    Are you actually offended by the stereotype?
    Yes.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by elizabeth25 View Post
    how many helium balloons would it take to lift a human of the ground?
    It depends on how big the balloons are and how much the human weighs.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by elizabeth25 View Post
    how many helium balloons would it take to lift a human of the ground?
    Ask the Mythbusters, they've done it twice.

    Approximately 7,000 to 9,000 cubic feet of helium. That's 16 six-foot-wide balloons*. http://www.clusterballoon.org/

    * Nope, I was wrong-- the author of this site's first flight was with 7 mylar balloons but he does not list their size or volume. That first flight reached 4000 feet altitude.

    If you mean standard sized party balloons I believe the MB's used something like 3,700.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  13. #73
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    Actually, I am genuinely puzzled by the observation that 50 years ago, everybody knew that it took four minutes to boil and egg. Five minutes if you wanted it not quite runny. Now, it takes eight minutes, or nine, for the same effect. At least, it does with the eggs I buy. I am fairly stationary, so relativistic effects can be ignored. But why this change? (I live at a height of 900 metres, but that surely can't make that much difference) Any ideas? Chicken feed?

  14. #74
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    Starting with boiling water versus starting with cold water.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    Starting with boiling water versus starting with cold water.
    Heck no, 'identical' experimental conditions, 'large' eggs placed in boiling water, with a pin-hole in the big end to stop them bursting. I'm genuinely puzzled.

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
    Actually, I am genuinely puzzled by the observation that 50 years ago, everybody knew that it took four minutes to boil and egg. Five minutes if you wanted it not quite runny. Now, it takes eight minutes, or nine, for the same effect. At least, it does with the eggs I buy. I am fairly stationary, so relativistic effects can be ignored. But why this change? (I live at a height of 900 metres, but that surely can't make that much difference) Any ideas? Chicken feed?
    Because of time inflation, 4 minutes 50 years ago are the equivalent of 8 minutes today.

    By the way, are you comparing egg times at 900 meters vs sea level? Water boils at 100C at sea level, but about 96C at 900 meters. This will make a difference, but I can't quantify it.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Because of time inflation, 4 minutes 50 years ago are the equivalent of 8 minutes today.

    By the way, are you comparing egg times at 900 meters vs sea level? Water boils at 100C at sea level, but about 96C at 900 meters. This will make a difference, but I can't quantify it.
    Yes, 4 minutes 50 years ago, at sea level. I mentioned the height difference because I just can't imagine it could make such a difference as to double the time. Perhaps I should take an egg down to the coast ...

  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
    Yes, 4 minutes 50 years ago, at sea level. I mentioned the height difference because I just can't imagine it could make such a difference as to double the time. Perhaps I should take an egg down to the coast ...
    Do it in the summer, bring lots of sunscreen, and make a holiday of it.

    (no, the sunscreen is not for the egg!)
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Do it in the summer, bring lots of sunscreen, and make a holiday of it.
    I don't need to - the coast is only 5 miles away. In fact I'm seeing some friends there this afternoon. I wonder if they eat boiled eggs.

  20. #80
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    Certain BAUTians (or visitors) who know there are rules here which are enforced. And yet they keep on with various "ideas" and behaviors and attitudes...and wind up getting infracted and/or suspended (maybe even eventually banned). Hello??

  21. #81
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    Why is gravity so persistent?
    Trigger warning - this post may contain information that some members disagree with. It might also end sentences with prepositions.

  22. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coelacanth View Post
    Why is gravity so persistent?
    It's the law!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  23. #83
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    If thou wilt weep my fortunes, take my eyes.
    I know thee well enough, thy name is Gloucester;
    Thou must be patient; we came crying hither:
    Thou know'st, the first time that we smell the air
    We wawl and cry.
    What kind of nasty chemicals were they baking that made the air smell?
    Trigger warning - this post may contain information that some members disagree with. It might also end sentences with prepositions.

  24. 2011-Dec-18, 05:58 PM
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    Thought better of it.

  25. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by elizabeth25 View Post
    how many helium balloons would it take to lift a human of the ground?
    "Lawnchair Larry" did it in 1982... Google him (sorry, I'm new and can't post links yet).

  26. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coelacanth View Post
    Why is gravity so persistent?
    I thought that was memory.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  27. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
    I am genuinely puzzled by the observation that 50 years ago,
    everybody knew that it took four minutes to boil an egg.
    Five minutes if you wanted it not quite runny. Now, it takes
    eight minutes, or nine, for the same effect.
    Refrigerators. 50 years ago you bought your eggs from the
    delivery man in the morning, and used them the same day.
    They never got cold.

    'Betty Crocker's Picture Cook Book' (first edition, 1950):

    Quote Originally Posted by Betty, page 252
    COOKED-IN-THE-SHELL

    1 Have eggs at room temperature to prevent "cracking"
    during cooking.

    2 Start in cold or boiling water.

    3 Cover eggs completely with water.

    4 Choose large enough pan. Do not pile eggs on top of
    each other.

    5 Time accurately, by clock or timer.

    6 Cook at temperature below boiling.

    Cold Water Start

    Soft-Cooked Eggs - 2 to 4 min. off the heat

    Hard-Cooked Eggs - 23 to 25 min. off the heat

    1 Cover eggs in saucepan with cold water.
    Heat until water boils.

    2 Remove from heat. Cover pan. Let stand
    off heat until eggs are cooked.

    Boiling Water Start

    Soft-Cooked Eggs - 3 to 5 min.

    Hard-Cooked Eggs - 18 to 20 min.

    1 Bring water to a boil in saucepan. With a spoon,
    carefully lower eggs into the water to prevent cracking
    the shell.

    2 Reduce heat. Keep water simmering until eggs
    are cooked. (Turn eggs several times . . . helps keep
    yolks centered.)
    That's enough typing.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  28. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    Refrigerators. 50 years ago you bought your eggs from the
    delivery man in the morning, and used them the same day.
    They never got cold.
    Nice try, but nope. These eggs I have here don't even live in the refrigerator, just a cupboard. I'm comparing room temperature in northern England 50 years ago with room temperature now, here in Tenerife. Guess which is the higher.

  29. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    Refrigerators. 50 years ago you bought your eggs from the
    delivery man in the morning, and used them the same day.
    They never got cold.
    I never keep eggs in the refrigerator.

    After a discussion at work, I looked up how long eggs keep. A surprisingly long time. Even more surprisingly, cooked eggs don't keep as long as fresh; boiling destroys the hermetic seal (as opposed to the hermitic seal).

  30. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
    Actually, I am genuinely puzzled by the observation that 50 years ago, everybody knew that it took four minutes to boil and egg. Five minutes if you wanted it not quite runny. Now, it takes eight minutes, or nine, for the same effect. At least, it does with the eggs I buy. I am fairly stationary, so relativistic effects can be ignored. But why this change? (I live at a height of 900 metres, but that surely can't make that much difference) Any ideas? Chicken feed?
    Same reason it used to take 3 or 4 hours to boil cabbage, but now it just needs a few seconds stir-frying.

  31. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Same reason it used to take 3 or 4 hours to boil cabbage, but now it just needs a few seconds stir-frying.

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